Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Censorship Proclamation 32. Our Lady' Psalter 33. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain34. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 35. Bradford's Letters 36. William Minge 37. James Trevisam 38. The Martyrdom of John Bland 39. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 40. Sheterden's Letters 41. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 42. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 43. Nicholas Hall44. Margery Polley45. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 46. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 47. John Aleworth 48. Martyrdom of James Abbes 49. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 50. Richard Hooke 51. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 52. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 53. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 54. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 55. Martyrdom of William Haile 56. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 57. William Andrew 58. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 59. Samuel's Letters 60. William Allen 61. Martyrdom of Roger Coo 62. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 63. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 64. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 65. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 66. Cornelius Bungey 67. John and William Glover 68. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 69. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 70. Ridley's Letters 71. Life of Hugh Latimer 72. Latimer's Letters 73. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed74. More Letters of Ridley 75. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 76. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 77. William Wiseman 78. James Gore 79. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 80. Philpot's Letters 81. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 82. Letters of Thomas Wittle 83. Life of Bartlett Green 84. Letters of Bartlett Green 85. Thomas Browne 86. John Tudson 87. John Went 88. Isobel Foster 89. Joan Lashford 90. Five Canterbury Martyrs 91. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 92. Letters of Cranmer 93. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 94. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 95. William Tyms, et al 96. Letters of Tyms 97. The Norfolk Supplication 98. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 99. John Hullier 100. Hullier's Letters 101. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 102. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 103. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 104. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 105. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 106. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 107. Gregory Crow 108. William Slech 109. Avington Read, et al 110. Wood and Miles 111. Adherall and Clement 112. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 113. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow114. Persecution in Lichfield 115. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 116. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 117. Examinations of John Fortune118. John Careless 119. Letters of John Careless 120. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 121. Agnes Wardall 122. Peter Moone and his wife 123. Guernsey Martyrdoms 124. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 125. Martyrdom of Thomas More126. Martyrdom of John Newman127. Examination of John Jackson128. Examination of John Newman 129. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 130. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 131. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 132. John Horne and a woman 133. William Dangerfield 134. Northampton Shoemaker 135. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 136. More Persecution at Lichfield
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1860 [1846]

Q. Mary. Iulins Palmer. Troubles of Agnes wardall in Ipswich.

MarginaliaAnno. 1556. Iuly. 26.suffered first for vs.

With these and suche like wordes, he did not onely comforte the hartes of his seelie brethren, that were with hym appointed as shepe to be slaine, but also wrested out plentifull teares, from the eyes of many that heard hym. MarginaliaPalmer, Guyn, Askine, brought to the place of slaughter.And as they were syngyng a Psalme, came the Sheriffe sir Richard Abridges, and the Bailiffes of the toune with a greate companie of harnesed, and weaponed men, to conducte them to the fire. When thei were come to the place, where they should suffer, they fell all three to the grounde, and Palmer with an audible voice, pronounced the. xxxi. Psalme: but the other twoo made their praiers secretly to almightie God.

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And as Palmer began to arise, there came behinde hym twoo Popishe Priestes, exhortyng hym yet to recant, and saue his soule. Palmer aunswered and saied: MarginaliaThe wordes of Palmer to the Popishe Priestes.Awaie, awaie, tempt me no longer. Awaie I saie from me, all ye that woorke iniquitie. For the Lorde hath heard the voice of my teares. And so forthwith thei put of their raimente, and went to the stake, and kissed it. And when they were bound to the post, Palmer saied: Good people praie for vs, that wee maie perseuere to the ende. And for Christes sake, beware of Popishe teachers, for they deceiue you.

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As he spake this, a seruaunte of one of the Bailiffes, threwe a Fagot at his face, that the bloude gushed out in diuerse places. For the whiche facte the Sheriffe reuiled hym, callyng hym cruell tormentour, and with his walkyng staffe brake his head, that the bloud likewise ran about his eares. When the fire was kindled, and beganne to take holde vpon their bodies: they lifte their handes towardes heauen, and quietly and cherefully, as though they had felte no smarte, they cried: MarginaliaThe wordes of these Martyrs at their death.Lord Iesu strength vs, Lorde Iesu assiste vs, Lorde Iesu receiue our soules. MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of the three godly Sainctes.And so they continued without any struglyng, holdyng vp their handes, and knockyng their hartes, and callyng vpon Iesu, vntill they had ended their mortall liues.

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Among other thynges, this is also to be noted, MarginaliaA notabte spectacle in the Martyrdome of Iulins Palmer.that after their three heades by force of the ragyng, and deuouryng flames of fire, were fallen together in a plūpe or cluster, whiche was marueilous to behold, and that they all were iudged already to haue giuē vp the ghost, sodainly Palmer, as a manne waked out of sleepe, moued his tongue and Iawes, and was heard to pronounce this woorde Iesu. So beyng resolued into Ashes, he yelded to GOD as ioyfull a soule (confirmed with the sweete promises of Christ) as any one that euer was called beside, to suffer for his blessed name. God graunte vs all to bee moued with the like spirite, woorkyng in our hartes constauntely to stande in defence, and confession of Christes holie Gospell, to the ende, Amen.

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De martyrio Palmeri hexasticon. MarginaliaEpitaphium in Palmerū.


Palmerus flammas Christi pro dogmate passus,
Impositum pondus, ceu bona palma tulit.
Non retrocessit, sed contra audentior iuit,
Illæsam retinens, fortis in igne fidem.
Propterea in cœlum nunc Palmifer iste receptus,
Iusticiæ Palmam non pereuntis habet.

Iustus vt Palma florebit.

¶ A memorable storie of one Agnes Wardall in the toune of Ipswiche pursued for the true faithe of Christes Gospell. 
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Agnes Wardall

This entire account was first introduced in the 1570 edition and was unchanged in subsequent editions. As Foxe reveals in a marginal note, at the end of this story, Foxe reveals that the source for this account was Peter Moon, whose account of his own ordeals follows this one.

MarginaliaIuly. A notable story of Agnes Wardall of Ipswich.ABout the saied monethe of Iuly, in this present yere. 1556. there was one Richard Argentine, Doctour of Phisicke, otherwise called Richard Sexten, with certaine other dwellyng then in the Toune of Ipswiche, not many in number, but in harte and purpose mightily bente to impugne, and impeache the growyng of Christes Gospell, and the fauourers of the same. MarginaliaD. Argentine Scholemaster, Mat. Butler. Constable, Phil. Vlmes, Edm. Leach. Iohn Steward persecutors.In the number of whō were Philip Vlmes, Edmonde Leache, Ihon Stewarde, and Mathewe Butler Apothecarie, 

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Phillip Ulmes is almost certainly Phillip Williams. In 1556, Williams, Steward and Butler sent a petition to the royal commissioners, denouncing protestants in Ipswich and urging that they be prosecuted (1576, p. 1981; 1583, pp. 2089-90).

a curious singyng mā, a fine plaier of the Organes, a perfecte Papiste, and a diligent promoter of good menne. This Butler beyng then Constable in the toune of Ipswiche, as he was in his watche by night vpon Cornehill, commeth to hym D. Argentine in greate haste, giuyng hym intelligence of one Agnes Wardall, beeyng then lately come home to her house in Ipswiche. Whereupon immediately suche a waie was contriued betwene them, that the said

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Agnes Wardall forthwith should be apprehended: but God in whose prouidence the directiō of al things consisteth, by whose disposition they haue their operatiō, so graciously prouided for his seruaunt, and so preuented their malignant deuises, that they came to no great effect in workyng, although on the contrary part there wanted no good will, as here consequentlie you shall further vnderstand.

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This Agnes Wardall was a womam that liued in Gods feare, 

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Agnes Wardall was a member of the parish of St Clement's in Ipswich which contained a striking number of protestants (see 1576, p. 1981; 1583, p. 2090). Richard Agentine was the rector of St Clement's, so he would certainly have known the Wardalls and his persecution of them may well have been personal.

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and was at defiaunce with their Romishe trashe, desiring rather with hard fare and euill lodging to be abroad, then to be at home in her house, & among the tentes of the vngodly: Her husband  
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For Agnes's husband, Robert Wardall, see 1576, p. 1981 and 1583, p. 2090).

also being a mā liuyng in the feare of God, and for the testimony of his conscience being also hunted, by force of the lawe was constrained to auoide his house, MarginaliaRobert Wardall driuen by persecution to serue in a ship.and got into a Crare 
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A small trading vessel.

with an honest man, seruyng as a sayler, a facultie not before of hym frequented, nor he a man nimble for that trade, because God had geuen him an impediment by reason of a stumped foote, vnfit to clymbe to top and yard: yet so it pleased GOD to enhable hym with his strength, that he was strong and lusty to do good seruice, as they can wel witnes that were of his company.

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The said Agnes Wardal chaunced on a day to come home to see her poore house and childrē, which was vnder the guidyng of a young maid, and beeyng espyed, newes was borne to D. Argentine, MarginaliaAgnes Wardall persecuted by D. Argentine and his mates.who hauing knowledge therof, as is afore said, went spedely vnto the Apothecary 

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I.e., Matthew Butler.

the Constable aforesaid, and informed hym what a notable cure was to bee brought on Wardals wife, in the apprehendyng of her. Whiche was more like to spede then misse, had not the mightie prouidence of God wrought contrary to their expectation.

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This knowen to the Constable the watch was charged speedely, and eche company sent to his place. And Argentine and Butler tooke vnto them a good nomber, and forth they go vnto the house of this poore woman to lay hands vpon her, and beset the house on the foreside and backeside, liyng open in the fieldes, and other some were set to the house of his mother, whiche was not farre from his house. MarginaliaVnmercifull seekers of a poore womans bloud.This doen, one knockt at the street doore, where Argentine and Butler was, with one of their Weapons, and no aunswere was made: the seconde tyme somwhat harder, but had no aunswere. In the meane tyme they fearyng that some conueiaunce was made, knocked the thirde tyme more harder then before.

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There was not far from the doore where they knocked, a certein bay window where one might looke out, and speake: And so at the thirde knockyng, a woman, who at that tyme was tenaunt to Robert Wardalles mother, & had but two nightes before lien in the house, speaking out hard by their eares, asked who was there?

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Ah syrrha, quod Argentine, are ye so nie and will not speake? How fortuned it that ye spake not at the first, beyng so nie? How fortuned it, quoth the woman? Mary I shall tell you: I am but a straunger here, and I haue heard saye, that there bee spirites walkyng hereabout, MarginaliaThe Lorde blesse euery good man and woman from such wicked spirites. which if a man do aunswere at the first call, or second, he standes in greate daunger: and I was neuer so afraid of my life. At this her aunswere, they laughed, and commaunded her to open the doore in the Quenes name: for they were the Queenes watch.

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Agnes Wardall beyng at that tyme in bed in an inner chamber, hauyng her maid with her, and her twoo children, she beyng at that tyme very heauy a sleepe, hard not the knockyng. MarginaliaHe sleepeth ne slumbreth not that keepeth Israell. Psa. 120.Her mayd hearyng at the second knocke, called and shogged her dame, and with muche ado awaked her, and said: the watche is at the doore. What thou liest, said she. Yes truly, said the maid, and hath knockt twise. With that she arose with all speede, and put on her clothes very sleyghtly, and tooke with her a Bocarom apron,which afterward she cast on her head, when she was faine to creepe in a ditch with nettels, and so passed doune into a parlour, wherin stoode a cupbord with a fayre presse, MarginaliaAgnes Wardal hydeth her selfe in a presse from the handes of her persecutors.into the whiche the mayd did locke her.

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And immediatly went vp to a chamber, whiche was hard by the streete, where she might see and speake to the watch, and said: who is there. Then they bad her open the doore. And she saide, we haue no Candle. And they saide, open the doore or we will laye it in the flore: With that she came doune and opened the dore. Then asked they the maid: who is within? And she said, none but a woman that dwelleth within vs, and twoo children. Thensaid they, where is thy dame? Truely, saide

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she
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