Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Censorship Proclamation 32. Our Lady' Psalter 33. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain34. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 35. Bradford's Letters 36. William Minge 37. James Trevisam 38. The Martyrdom of John Bland 39. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 40. Sheterden's Letters 41. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 42. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 43. Nicholas Hall44. Margery Polley45. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 46. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 47. John Aleworth 48. Martyrdom of James Abbes 49. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 50. Richard Hooke 51. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 52. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 53. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 54. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 55. Martyrdom of William Haile 56. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 57. William Andrew 58. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 59. Samuel's Letters 60. William Allen 61. Martyrdom of Roger Coo 62. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 63. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 64. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 65. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 66. Cornelius Bungey 67. John and William Glover 68. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 69. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 70. Ridley's Letters 71. Life of Hugh Latimer 72. Latimer's Letters 73. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed74. More Letters of Ridley 75. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 76. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 77. William Wiseman 78. James Gore 79. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 80. Philpot's Letters 81. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 82. Letters of Thomas Wittle 83. Life of Bartlett Green 84. Letters of Bartlett Green 85. Thomas Browne 86. John Tudson 87. John Went 88. Isobel Foster 89. Joan Lashford 90. Five Canterbury Martyrs 91. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 92. Letters of Cranmer 93. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 94. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 95. William Tyms, et al 96. Letters of Tyms 97. The Norfolk Supplication 98. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 99. John Hullier 100. Hullier's Letters 101. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 102. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 103. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 104. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 105. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 106. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 107. Gregory Crow 108. William Slech 109. Avington Read, et al 110. Wood and Miles 111. Adherall and Clement 112. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 113. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow114. Persecution in Lichfield 115. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 116. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 117. Examinations of John Fortune118. John Careless 119. Letters of John Careless 120. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 121. Agnes Wardall 122. Peter Moone and his wife 123. Guernsey Martyrdoms 124. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 125. Martyrdom of Thomas More126. Martyrdom of John Newman127. Examination of John Jackson128. Examination of John Newman 129. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 130. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 131. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 132. John Horne and a woman 133. William Dangerfield 134. Northampton Shoemaker 135. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 136. More Persecution at Lichfield
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1861 [1847]

Quene Mary. The trouble of Agnes wardall in Ipswiche.

MarginaliaAnno. 1556. Iuly. MarginaliaExample of a faithfull maide to her mistres.she, I can not tell, shee is not within. She was here in the euenyng, sayde they. Yea, saide the maide, but she went forth I knowe not whether. Notwithstandyng they charged her that she knewe where she was, whiche she denied. Then got they a Candle light at one of the neighbours houses, and came in: and in the Entrie met the woman which had aunswered them at the window, and said, she was afraied of spirites. Argentine lokyng vpon her, clapt her on the backe, and said: thou art not the womam whom we seeke for.

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MarginaliaThe house searched for Agnes Wardall.So entred they the house, and searched a Parlour next the streete where the woman lay, whiche was his mothers tenaunt, and a young child that sucked on her brest, and not only in the bed turnyng it downe past all honest humanitie, but also vnder the bedde, behind the Painted clothes, and in the Chimney and vp into the Chymney. And findyng the bedde hoate, saide: who lay here in the bed. The woman said: I and my child. And none els, quoth they. No, said the woman. When they could find nothing there for their purpose, from thence they went into an inner parlour, in the which stode the Cupbord wherein she was, and searched the Parlour, which was but a litle one. MarginaliaGods marueilous protection working for his seruaunt.And on of the cōpany laying his hand on the cupbord, saide: this is a fayre cupbord, she maie bee here for any thing that is doone. That is true, saith an other of them. Notwithstandyng they loked no farther, but went from that into the chamber a loft, wherein the said Agnes had layen with her mayde and children, with all other rowmes and chambers.

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At length came downe into the yarde, where they found a horse tyed at a pale eatyng of shorne Grasse. Then asked they the maide: whose horse is this? She aunswered, it is her horse in deede, and she came in before night, and went abroad againe, but I knowe not whether. Then were they in good hope to finde their pray, and bestirred them with speede, and went into an out Chamber that was in the yearde, in whiche was a boy in bed of 13. or 14. yeres old. And beyng in his dead sleepe, they sodenly awaked hym, and examined him for his dame. Who answered he knew not where she was. and vnto that stoode firmely, although their threates were vehement, not onely to the poore sely boy, but also to the good simple plaine mayd. Then caused they him to arise and dresse hym, MarginaliaThe boy and the maide sent to the cage.and sent both mayd and boy vp to the cage, where they put the mayde, but kept the boy among their trustie Souldiours, so that one of them should not speake with an other.

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Now, while some were on the cornehill, and other some searching the neighbours houses and backesides, MarginaliaAnges Wardal in daunger to be smothered.the wife of Wardall being in the presse fast locked, and almost smothered for want of breath, desired the womā her mothers Tenaunt, when she hard her in the Parlour, to let her out. She asked her where the keyes were: Who aunswered they were in a hamper, whiche she found and assaied to vnlocke the Presse, and of a long tyme could not. Then desired she her to breake it open: for (said she) I had rather fall into their handes, then to kill my selfe. Then went her mothers tenaunt, and sought for her housbandes hammer and chysell, to breake it open, but could not find it, nor any thyng els to breake it open with all, and came againe and tolde her she could finde nothing to breake it open with.

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MarginaliaGods merciful helpe in the tyme of neede.Then sayde she, assay againe to open it, for I truste God will geue you power to open it. And being within in much extremitie, she hartily prayed vnto God, who heard her prayer, and helped her: for at the first assay and turne of the key, it opened easely. When she came out, she looked as pale and as bleake as one that were layd out dead by the walles, and as she her selfe looked afterward when she was dead, as the same woman reported, whiche then let her out, and was also at her death long after in the Quenes Maiesties raigne that now is, and al on a vehement sweat was she like droppes of rayne.

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Then went she out into the backeside, where was a pale toward the fieldes for the defence of the Garden, wherein was one or two loose pales, by the which both she and her husband had diuers times vsed to come and go in and out: so went she out into the fieldes. And passing one litle field and ouer a stile, shrouded her selfe in a low ditch with nettles: & couered her head whith the bocarom apron afore mentioned, and so crept low, and lay in the ditch. After long search, when thei could not find her in the towne, certaine of the watche retourned agayne into the fieldes side: among whom was one George Mannyng with MarginaliaIohn Bate cryer of Ipswich, a spitefull enemie against Gods people.Iohn Bate the Crier of the

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same towne commyng together. This Mannyng was a simple honest plaine man, but Bate a verie enemie, and one that in Quene Maries time would haue bene a Priest, as it was reported, but that he was maried.

Mannyng espiyng where she lay, gaue a hemme, and made a noyce with his bil, he being before Bate, at the which she lay still: MarginaliaAnother escap of Agnes Wardall by Gods good prouidence.and at last they departed to the stret side to the Constable. All this time the maide was in the Cage, and the boy with the other of the watche vntill perfite day light. Then went they vp and let out the maid, and sent her home, & the boy also? but they made the mayd beleue they had found her dame. Who aunswered: if ye haue her, kepe her fast.

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On the morow, MarginaliaGeorge Mannyng an honest man.Mannyng sent her word to beware that she should hyde her selfe no more so neare.

Thus by the might and power of God was his faithfull seruaunt deliuered from their crueltie, and they knowen to be his aduersaries, not onely at that tyme, but diuers tymes after and before. Notwithstandyng, MarginaliaThe doinges and conditions of Doctour Argentine described.the sayd Argentine at his first commyng to Ipswiche, came in a Seruyng mans coate. And then beyng in the daies of Kyng Henry the viij. he would accustomablie vse the readyng of Lectures him selfe, in the whiche he was well commended at that tyme. After obtained the office of vsher of the free Grammer schole: and the master beyng dead, got to be master him selfe. And beyng maried to a verie honest woman, MarginaliaD. Argentine in Kyng Edwardes tyme a Protestaunt.remained there the daies of King Edward. And when God tooke him frō vs for our iuste deserued plague, and Queene Mary came to her Raigne, MarginaliaD. Argentine in Quene Maries time a foule Papist, and a persecutour.none more hoate in all Papistrie and Superstition, then he, paintyng the Postes of the towne with viuat Regina Maria, in euery corner.

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Furthermore, after the death of his wife (which was an honest woman) was made a Priest: takyng vppon hym diuers tymes to preache (but neuer without his white miniuer hode) suche doctrine as was shamefull to heare, saiyng Masse, and cariyng about the Pixe in hye processions. Furthermore, leadyng the boy S. Nicolas with his miniuer hode, about the streetes for apples and belie chere. And who so woulde not receaue him, he made them heretikes, and suche also as would not giue his fagot to the bonefire for Queene Maries child. And thus continued he at Ipswich the most part of Queene Maries daies, molestyng there good men: some for not goyng to the Church: some for not beyng confessed: some for not receauing, &c. till at length, towarde the end of Queene Mary, he came to London, and in this Queenes tyme began to shewe him selfe againe a perfect Protestant. And thus much of Argentine. Ex testimonio Petri Moonæi.

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¶ The trouble of Peter Moone and his wife, and of other godly Protestantes at Byshop Hoptons visitation in Ipswiche. 
Commentary  *  Close
Peter Moon

This account was introduced in the 1570 edition and was unchanged in subsequent editions. As Foxe records in a marginal note, his source for this account was Peter Moon himself. Peter Moon was the author of a number of protestant polemical works written at the outset of Edward VI's reign: A short treatyse of certayne thinges abused in the popish church (Ipswich: 1548), STC 18055; A plaister for a galled horse (London, 1548), STC 20622 and A corosyfe to be layd harde unto the hartes of all faythfull professors of Christes gospels (London: 1548?), STC 20661. On Moon see J. Webb, 'Peter Moone of Ipswich (d. 1601). A Tudor Poet and Gospeller and his Circle,' Proceedings of the Suffolk Institute of Archaeology and History, 38 (1993), pp. 35-55.

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IN the yeare of our Lord God. 1556. The sceane or visitation, beeyng kept before Whitsontyde, in the towne of Ipswich in Suffolke, by D. Hopton being then Bishop of Norwiche, and Myles Dunnynges, beeyng then hys Chaūcelour, diuers and sondry godly protestantes, through the accusation of euill men, were sore troubled and presented before hym: MarginaliaPeter Moone accused to B. Hopton.among whom were accused one Peter Moone a Taylor, and Anne his wife: for their disobedience to the law, in not shewyng their readines to come to the Churche, and to bee partaker of such Romish obseruances as at that tyme were vsed. 

Commentary  *  Close

There was more to Moon's arrest than this. Along with John Ramsey (see 1576, p. 1981; 1583, p. 2090), Christopher Goodman and William West, Moon had been sent to the Tower in the summer of 1554 for leading a conspiracy against Mary (APC V, pp. 65 and 70 as well as Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series, Mary I, 1553-58, ed. C. S. Knighton [London: 1998], p. 358). Moon was released on a bond of £200 and a promise to confess publicly his offense in his parish church. Moon must have already been regarded with considerable suspicion by the authorities.

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And first the said Peter Moone was commaunded to come before the Bishoppe, where he was examined of three sondry Articles, Marginalia3. Articles obiected to Peter Moone. to witte: 1. Whether the Pope were supreme head: 2. Whether Kyng Philippe and Queene Mary were right inheritours to the crowne. 3. And whether in the Sacrament of the altar was the very body of Christ substācially & really there present.

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Vnto the whiche, MarginaliaPeter Moone graunteth to the Bishops articles through infirmitie.the saide Peter beyng timerous and weake, fearing more the face of man then the heauy wrath of God, affirmed and in maner graunted vnto the demaundes. Whereupon the Bishop beyng in good hope, that although hee had not come to the Church, nor receiued their Sacrament of the Aultar, nor bene readie to doe his duetie as the law had commaunded: yet there shewyng his mynde, saide, that he liked well the man: for such as haue bene (said he) earnest in euill thinges, will also be earnest in that that is

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good
EEEE.e.ij.
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