Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Censorship Proclamation 32. Our Lady' Psalter 33. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain34. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 35. Bradford's Letters 36. William Minge 37. James Trevisam 38. The Martyrdom of John Bland 39. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 40. Sheterden's Letters 41. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 42. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 43. Nicholas Hall44. Margery Polley45. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 46. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 47. John Aleworth 48. Martyrdom of James Abbes 49. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 50. Richard Hooke 51. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 52. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 53. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 54. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 55. Martyrdom of William Haile 56. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 57. William Andrew 58. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 59. Samuel's Letters 60. William Allen 61. Martyrdom of Roger Coo 62. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 63. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 64. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 65. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 66. Cornelius Bungey 67. John and William Glover 68. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 69. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 70. Ridley's Letters 71. Life of Hugh Latimer 72. Latimer's Letters 73. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed74. More Letters of Ridley 75. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 76. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 77. William Wiseman 78. James Gore 79. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 80. Philpot's Letters 81. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 82. Letters of Thomas Wittle 83. Life of Bartlett Green 84. Letters of Bartlett Green 85. Thomas Browne 86. John Tudson 87. John Went 88. Isobel Foster 89. Joan Lashford 90. Five Canterbury Martyrs 91. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 92. Letters of Cranmer 93. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 94. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 95. William Tyms, et al 96. Letters of Tyms 97. The Norfolk Supplication 98. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 99. John Hullier 100. Hullier's Letters 101. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 102. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 103. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 104. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 105. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 106. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 107. Gregory Crow 108. William Slech 109. Avington Read, et al 110. Wood and Miles 111. Adherall and Clement 112. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 113. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow114. Persecution in Lichfield 115. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 116. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 117. Examinations of John Fortune118. John Careless 119. Letters of John Careless 120. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 121. Agnes Wardall 122. Peter Moone and his wife 123. Guernsey Martyrdoms 124. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 125. Martyrdom of Thomas More126. Martyrdom of John Newman127. Examination of John Jackson128. Examination of John Newman 129. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 130. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 131. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 132. John Horne and a woman 133. William Dangerfield 134. Northampton Shoemaker 135. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 136. More Persecution at Lichfield
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1862 [1848]

Quene Mary. Persecution in Suffolke. The troubles of Peter Moone and his wife.

MarginaliaAnno. 1556. Iuly.good and godly, of once they be wonne.

Thus as this Spirituall father was commendyng his carnall child, and rather preferryng him to hel fire, then vnto the sincere word and commaundementes of God, it chaunced amongest many others in the chamber, was one of the portmen of the same towne named Sharpe, 

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Richard Smart, a baliff of Ipswich and an MP, will be mentioned again by Foxe as having interrupted the prayers of the martyr Alexander Gouch at the stake.

MarginaliaCommendation of Sharpe of Ipswich. an earnest member of their Romish law, doyng of a very cōscience that he did, who after the death of Queene Mary liued not many yeares, MarginaliaRich. Sharpe of Ipswich repenteth his Popery at his death.but rendred his life in godly repentaunce, protesting that if GOD shoulde suffer hym to liue, he would neuer bee the man he had beene before, what lawes soeuer should come againe: so that before the time of his sickenes, he frequētyng earnestly the Sermons made in the same Towne by diuers godly learned, would weepe as it had bene a childe, beeyng notwithstandyng of courage as stout a man as any was in Ipswiche. Such is the maruelous mercy of God, in callyng to his kyngdome, whom, and when he pleaseth.

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This portman aforesaid, perceauing the Bishoppe thus, as it were, at an end with the said Moone, and so he like to be discharged, said vnto the bishop: MarginaliaSharpe accuseth Moones wife.my Lord, in dede I haue a good hope in the man, and that he wil be conformable: but my Lorde, he hath a perillous woman vnto his wife. For I will tell you my Lorde, she neuer came to Church yet, since the Queenes reigne, except it were at Euensong, or when shee was churched. And not then vntill Masse were done. Wherfore your good Lordship might doe a good deede to cause her to come before you, and to see if ye could doe anie good. And therefore I beseeche your good Lordship to commaund him to pray her to come before your Lordship.

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At the which wordes, Moone was somwhat stirred in that he said, commaund him to praie her to come before your Lordshippe. And he sayd vnto him, vnder my Lordes correction I speake, I am as able to cōmaund her to come before my Lorde, as ye are to commaunde the worst boy in your house. Yea my Lorde, said the other, I cry your Lordshippe mercy: I haue informed your Lordship with an vntroth, if this be so. But if he be so able as he saith, he might haue commaunded her to haue come to Churche in all this tyme, if it had pleased him. Well said the Bishop, looke ye come before me again at after noone, MarginaliaPeter Moone commaunded to bring his wife before the Bishop.and bring your wife with you: I will talke with her.

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As my Lordes dinner at that tyme was seruyng vp, Moone departed and taried not to take part therof hauing such an hard breakfast giuen him before to digest. At after none Moone delaid and waited his time, bethinkyng when he might moste cōueniently come, especially when his accuser and his wiues should not haue beene there. And accordyng to commaundement came with his wife, whiche was not so secretly, but his accuser had knowledge thereof, and came with all expedition in such post speede, that in a maner he was wyndlesse entryng into the Bishops chamber.

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The Bishop hearing that Moone and his wife were come, called for them, MarginaliaMoone & hys wife brought before the Bishop.and said to Moone: is this your wife Moone? Yea my Lord, said he. O good Lord (said the Bishop) howe a man may be deceaued in a woman. I promise you a man woulde take her for as honest a woman, by all outward appearaunce, as can bee. Why my Lord, said Moones wife, I trust there is none that can charge me with any dishonestie, as concernyng my body, I defie all the world in that respect.

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Nay (quod the Bishoppe) I meane not, as concernyng the dishonestie of thy bodie: but thou hadst bene better to haue geuen the vse of thy bodie vnto xx. sondry men, then to doe as thou hast done. MarginaliaB. Hopton preferreth xx. men committing adultery, before one woman transgressyng the Popes ordinaunces.For thou haste done as much as in thee lieth, to plucke the King and the Quenes Maiesties out of their royall Seates, through thy disobedience, in shewyng thy selfe an open enemy vnto Gods lawes, and their procedinges.

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Then began the Bishop to examine the said Moone again, with the aforesaid articles, & his wife also. And hearyng her husband relent, did also affirme the same, whiche turned vnto either of them no small trouble of minde afterwarde, but yet neither were they like thus to escape, but that in the meane time Dunning the Bishops Chaūcelour came vp in great hast, and brought newes to the Bishop, that there were suche a nomber of Heretickes come, of whiche some came from Boxford, some from Lanham, and about from the Clothe countrey, that it woulde make a man out of his wittes to heare them, and there are among them both heretickes and Anabaptistes, said he. And thus Doct. Dun-

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nyng with his blostering wordes interruptyng Moones examination, went doune againe as the deuill had driuen him, to kepe his sturre among them, and to take order what should be done with them.

The Bishop beginnyng to bewayle the state of the countrey, in that it was so infected with such a number of Heretickes and rehearsing partly their opinions to those that were at that tyme in the chamber, Moones wife had a young child, whiche she her selfe nursed, and the childe beyng brought into the yeard vnder the Bishops chamber cryed, so that she heard it, and then said: My Lorde, I trust ye haue doone with mee. MarginaliaMoones child a part of Gods prouidence in their deliueraunce frō further trouble.My childe crieth beneth, I muste goe giue my childe sucke, with such like words. And the Bishop beyng, as it were, out of mind to talke with thē any more, said: go your way, I will talke with you in the morning: looke ye be here againe in the mornyng: with this they both departed.

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And beneath in the stone Hall of the same house, the Chauncelour Dunnyng beeyng very busie about his bloudy busines, espied Moone and his wife commyng, and must needes passe by the place where he stode, and said: Nay soft, I must talke with you both: for ye are as euill as any that are here to day. To whō Moones wife answered: My Lord hath had vs in examination, and therfore ye shall haue nought to do with vs. Nay, quod he, ye shall not so escape. I must talke with you also. Vnto whom Moone answered: MarginaliaMoones aunswere to the Bishoppes Chauncelour.In the presence of the more, the lesse hath no power: My Lorde hath taken order with vs, and therfore we are as his Lordship hath appointed, and must repaire before hym againe to morow. MarginaliaMoone and his wife escaped from the Bishop and his Chauncelour.At the which he let them go, although he was earnestly procured by the partie aboue specified, to haue shewed his qualitie, which was nothing els but tyrāny.

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So departed Moone and his wife without hurt of body: MarginaliaMoone and his wife confounded in cōscience for their deniall.but afterward when they with Peter the Apostle behelde the face of Christe, they were sore wounded in conciences, ashamed of their doynges, and also at the doore of desperation. In so muche, that when the sayd Moone came home to his House, and entryng into a parlour alone by him selfe, cōsidering his estate, & sawe where a sword of his did hang against a wall, was earnestly allured by the enemie Sathan to haue taken it downe, MarginaliaMoone seeketh to kill him self, but by Gods mercifull prouidence was preserued.and therwith to haue slaine hym selfe: but God, who casteth not away the penitent sinner repenting his fall with harte, defended his vnworthy seruaunt from that temptation, and hath (I truste) lefte hym to the amendement of life by the assistaunce of his holie spirite and to make him one among the elect that shalbe saued.

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The morow they both remained and kept house with no small grief of conscience waityng and lookyng with feare, when to be sent for to the Bishop, rather then offeryng their diligence to kepe the Bishoppes appointment, MarginaliaGods prouidence in sending awaie the Bishop.but God so wrought, that when the tyme drewe neare that they feared callyng forth, the bels ronge for the bishops departure out of the towne. 

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Bishop Hopton seems to have left Ipswich in considerable haste. Was he troubled by the resistance he encountered during his visitation?

For the which they were not onely glad, but also manie a good harte in Ipswiche reioysed and gaue thankes to God. God for his mercie graunt, that our sinne neuer deserue to prouoke Gods ire, that the like daies come againe. And if it so do, God make them, with all other weakelinges, strong and worthy souldiours to incoūter with the ghostly enemies, the world, the flesh, and the deuill. And boldly to stand to the confession of Christ, and of his Gospell, saiyng with the Apostles: Whether it be right in the sight of God, that we should obey you more then God, iudge ye. MarginaliaTestified and recorded by Peter Moone.

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¶ A tragicall, lamentable, and pitifull History, full of most cruell and tyrannicall murder, done by the pretensed Catholiques, vpon three women and an Infant: to wyt, the mother, her two daughters, and the child, in the Isle of Garnesey, for Christes true Religion, the yeare of our Lord. 1556. Iuly. 18. 
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The Guernsey Martyrs

Almost from the moment it was printed, the veracity of Foxe's account of this horrible episode was challenged. The reader seeking to understand both this episode, and the context in which it occurred, can do no better than consult D. M. Ogier, Reformation and Society in Guernsey (Woodbridge, Suffolk: 1996), esp. pp. 55-83.

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Foxe's basic account of this tragedy first appeared in the 1563 edition. It was based on the petition of Mathieu Cauches (the brother of Catherine Cauches) made to the privy council asking for the punishment of those who burned his sister and his nieces (see Cal. of State Papers Domestic Add. VI, p. 484). Someone on the privy council, probably William Cecil, supplied Foxe with a copy of this document.

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In 1567, the catholic polemicist Thomas Harding printed a brief but stinging attack on Foxe's account of the incident, which accused Foxe of lying and the three women who were executed as being immoral criminals who received a deserved punishment (Thomas Harding, The Reiondre to Mr Jewels replie against the sacrifice of the Masse [Louvain: 1567], STC 12761, fos. 184r-185v).

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In the 1570 edition, Foxe responded to this, first by adding additional documentation, which confirmed the accuracy of his first account. (It also enabled him to add the names of the martyred women and of Jacques Amy). Most of this documentation sprang from the successful efforts of Thomas Effart, a Guernsey jurat (one of twelve people who, under the baliff, formed Guernsey's royal court, which administered the internal affairs of the island) to secure a pardon for JacquesAmy and the other officials responsible for the burnings, and from the pardon itself. In response to Harding's claims that Massy was unmarried and her son illegitimate, Foxe obtained testimony from a Huguenot minister living in London who had conducted Massy's marriage. (This, by the way, is a good example of the ways in which catholic attacks on the first edition spurred Foxe on to greater research). Foxe then added a direct rebuttal of Harding's arguments.

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MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of three women with a young Infant, burnt in the Isle of Gernesey. MarginaliaIuly. 18.AMong all and singular Hystories touched in this booke before, as there bee many pitifull, diuers lamentable, some Horrible and Tragicall: so is there none almost either in cruelty to be compared 

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This is a rare example of the language of a passage being less restrained in the 1570 edition than in the 1563 edition; this is another result of Foxe responding to Harding.

or so farre of from al compassion and sense of humanity, as this merciles fact of the Papistes, done in the Isle of Garnesey, vpon three women and an infant, whose names be these, as folow.

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Katherine
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