Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Alice Benden and other martyrs10. Examinations of Matthew Plaise11. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs12. Ambrose13. Richard Lush14. Edmund Allen15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. Priest's Wife of Exeter49. The Final Five Martyrs50. John Hunt and Richard White51. John Fetty52. Nicholas Burton53. John Fronton54. Another Martyrdom in Spain55. Baker and Burgate56. Burges and Hoker57. The Scourged: Introduction58. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax59. Thomas Greene60. Bartlett Greene and Cotton61. Steven Cotton's Letter62. James Harris63. Robert Williams64. Bonner's Beating of Boys65. A Beggar of Salisbury66. Providences: Introduction67. The Miraculously Preserved68. William Living69. Edward Grew70. William Browne71. Elizabeth Young72. Elizabeth Lawson73. Christenmas and Wattes74. John Glover75. Dabney76. Alexander Wimshurst77. Bosom's wife78. Lady Knevet79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Edward Benet85. Jeffrey Hurst86. William Wood87. Simon Grinaeus88. The Duchess of Suffolk89. Thomas Horton 90. Thomas Sprat91. John Cornet92. Thomas Bryce93. Gertrude Crockhey94. William Mauldon95. Robert Horneby96. Mistress Sandes97. John Kempe98. Thomas Rose99. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers100. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth101. The Unprosperous Queen Mary102. Punishments of Persecutors103. Foreign Examples104. A Letter to Henry II of France105. The Death of Henry II and others106. Justice Nine-Holes107. John Whiteman108. Admonition to the Reader109. Hales' Oration110. Cautions to the Reader111. Snel112. Laremouth113. William Hunter's Letter
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1882 [1867]

Q. Mary. Visitation in Cambridge. Processe against Bucer & Phagius.

MarginaliaAnno. 1556. MarginaliaIanuary. 16.Court might the better determine what ought to bee done to them by order of lawe.

The Commissioners condescended to his request, and the next daye processe went out to cite the offendours. This citation Vincent of Noally their common Notarie, hauyng first read it ouer before certaine witnesses appoynted for the same purpose, caused to be fixed vp in places conuenient, to witte, vpon S. Marie church doore, the doore of the common Schooles, and the crosse in the marketsteade of the same towne. MarginaliaM. Bucer and Phagius cited out of their graues to appeare, or any other þt would aunswere for them.In this was specified, that who soeuer would mainteyne Bucer and Phagius, or stand in defence of their doctrine, should at the xviij. day of the same moneth stand forth before the L. Commissioners in S. Marie church, which was appointed the place of iudgement, and there euery man should be sufficiently heard what he could say. This commaundement was set out with many wordes.

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Shortly after, the matter drew toward iudgement. Therefore the next day before the day limited, whiche was the xvij. of Ianuary, MarginaliaIanuary. 17. the Vicechauncellour called to him to Peterhouse (wherof he was Maister.) MarginaliaWitnesses sworne against M. Bucer.Doct. Yong, Doct. Segiswyke, & with them Bullocke, Tayler, Parker, and Redmā, Whitlocke, Mytch, and certaine others. These mē cast their heades together how they might beare witnes agaynst Bucer & Phagius, to conuince them of heresie. For seyng the matter was brought in face of open Court, and because it might so come to passe: that some Patrones of their cause would come out, they thought it nedefull to haue witnesses to depose of their doctrine. What came of this their consultation, it is not perfectly knowen.

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MarginaliaIanuary. 18.The xviij. day the Vicechauncellour going to the Inquisitours sittyng at the kinges Colledge, did put them in remembraunce, that the same was the day in which by their processe sent forth the xvi. daye before, they had commaunded to appeare in S. Marie church such as would take vppon them to defend Bucer and Phagius by the lawe. Hee desired therefore that they would vouchsafe to sit there, if perchaunce any man would trie the aduenture of the law. They lightly cōdescended therunto. When the Vicechauncellour had brought them thether, he exhibited vnto them the processe of the Citation which he had receiued of them to publish a litle before, saying that he had diligently executed what soeuer the contentes of the same required. After that they had taken their places, and that no mā put forth him selfe to aunswere for the offendours, the Iudges called aside Doct. Yong, Doct. Segiswike, Bullocke, Tayler, Maptide, Hunter, Parker, Redman, aboue mentioned. MarginaliaOther witnesses sworne against Master Bucer.Also Browne, Gogmā, Rud, Iohnson, Mytch, Rauen and Carre, who had before written out the buriall of Bucer, with a singular commendation of him, and sent it to Syr Iohn Cheke knight. These men taking first their oth vpō a booke, were commaunded to beare witnesse agaynst the heresies and doctrine of Bucer and Phagius. The xxij. daye of the same moneth was limited to thys iurie to bring in their verdicte.

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In the meane while, Ormanet and Doct. Watson abode at home in their lodging, to take the depositions of them whom we shewed you before to haue bene called to Peterhouse, and to haue communicated with the Vicechauncellour as cōcernyng that matter, whose depositiōs (as I told you) neuer came to light. The Byshop of Chester and Doct. Cole this day visited them of Katherine Hall, where, as farre as could be learned, nothyng was done worthy of rehearsall.

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MarginaliaA Relicke giuē by Ormanet to Trinitie Colledge.As Ormanet þe Popes Datary was sitting at Trinitie Colledge, Iohn Dale, one of the Queenes Colledge, came to him, whom he had commaunded before to bryng with hym the pixe, wherein the Byshop of Romes God of bread is wont to be enclosed. For Ormanet told thē he had a precious iewell: the same was a linnen clout that the Pope had consecrated with hys owne handes, which he promised to bestow vpon them for a gift. But Dale misuderstandyng Ormanet, in stede of the pixe brought a chalice and a singyng cake, called the hoste, the which he had wrapped vp and put in his bosome. When he was come, Ormanet demaūded if hee had brought him the thing he sent him for. To whom he aunswered, he had brought it. Thē geue it me (quod he). Dale pulled out the chalice & the singyng cake. MarginaliaOrmanet in a peltyng chafe with M. Dale.When Ormanet saw that, he stepped somewhat backe as it had bene in a wonder, callyng hym blockehead, & litle better then a mad man, demaundyng what

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he mēt by those thynges, saying: he willed hym to bryng none of that gere, and that he was vnworthy to enioy so hygh a benefite: yet notwithstandyng for as much as he had promised before to geue it them, hee would performe his promise. Wherupon with great reuerēce and Ceremony he pulled out the linnen cloth and layd it in the chalice, and the bread with it, commaundyng them both for the holynes of the thing, and also for the authour of it, to keepe it among them with such due reuerence as belonged to so holy a relique.

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MarginaliaA commaundement for brynging in of hereticall bookes.About the same time the Commissioners had geuen commaundement to the Maisters of the Colledges, that euery man should put in writyng what bookes he had, with the authours names. And to the intent that euery man should execute it without deceit, they tooke a corporall othe of them. This commaundement some executed exactely and diligentely: other some, for as much as they demed it wrongfull, executed it slackely enough.

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We declared before that the xviij. day was limited for the day of iudgement. Whē the day came, and that neither Bucer nor Phagius would appeare at their call in the Court, nor that any put forth him self to defend them: yet the courtuous Commissioners woulde not procede to iudgemēt, which neuerthelesse, for their contumacy in absentyng them selues, they might haue done, consideryng how that day was peremptory. MarginaliaGraciously considered. But these men beyng bent altogether to equitie and mercy, had rather shewe some fauor, then to doe the vttermost they might by the law. MarginaliaMartin Bucer and Paulus Phagius the seconde tyme cited to appeare.Wherupon Vincent published the secōd proces, and set it vp in the same places, as in maner before. The meanyng therof varied not much from the first, but that it put of the iudgemēt day vnto the xxvi. of the same moneth. Vpon the which day the Vicechauncellour was sent for to their lodgyng, with whom they agreed concernyng the order of publishing the sentence. And because there should want no solemnitie in the matter, they commaunded hym further to warne the Maior of the Towne to be there at the day appointed, with all his burgesses, which the Vicechaūcellour did speede with all readines.

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MarginaliaIanuary. 26.This day (as I said) was the 26. of Ianuary, which being now come, first all degres of the mother Vniuersitie were assembled. And to fill vp this pageāt, thether came also the Maior and his townesmen, and all met together in S. Marie Church to behold what there should be determined vpō these men. After long attendaunce, at length the Commissioners came forth and went vp to a scaffold that was somewhat higher then the residue, prepared for the same purpose. MarginaliaAn high matter in a low house. When they had taken their places, Doct. Perne the Vicechauncellour, the player of this enterlude, fashionyng his countenaunce with great grauitie, reached to them the proces that was lastly published, to cite them, saying these wordes: I bryng forth agayne (quod he) to you right reuerend fathers and Commissioners of the most reuerend my Lord Cardinall Poole (payntyng out the rest of his stile) this Citatiō executed according to the purport and effect of the same: omittyng nothyng for his part that might make to the commēdation of this matter. When he had thus finished his tale, by and by the Byshop of Chester, after he had a litle vewed the people, began in maner as followeth.

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¶ The Oration of Doct. Scot byshop of Chester, 
Commentary  *  Close

In the 1563 edition, Foxe, following Golding, refers to the bishop of Chester as the bishop of 'West Chester'. (This is because the bishop of the older see of Chichester had traditionally been referred to as the bishop of Chester). In the 1570 edition, Foxe changed 'West Chester' to Chester.

before the condemnation of Bucer and Phagius.

MarginaliaThe Oration of Doct. Scot Bishop of Chester, before the pronouncyng of the sentence of condēnation.YE see (quod he) how sore the Vniuersitie presseth vppon vs, how earnest intercession it maketh vnto vs, not onely to denounce Bucer and Phagius, which, these certain yeares past haue spread most pernicious doctrine among you, to be heretickes (as they be in dede) but also that we will commaund their dead carcasses, which vnto this daye haue obtained honorable buriall among you, to be digged vp, & as it is excellently ordeined by the Canon lawe, to bee cast into fire, or what soeuer is more greuous then fire, if any can be. MarginaliaWhat dissembling is here in these Popeholy Catholickes?For the degrees of the Vniuersitie deale not slyghtly nor slackely with vs in this case, but doe so presse vppon vs, and folow the sute so earnestly, that they scarce geue vs any respite of delay. And I assure you, albeit this case of it selfe be such, as that euen the vnworthynes of those persons though there were no further cause, ought to induce vs to the doyng thereof, muche the rather moued with these so wholesome petitions, it is mete and conuenient we should graunt it. MarginaliaTyrannie couered with the visor of mercy.For how soeuer we of our

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selues
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