Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Alice Benden and other martyrs10. Examinations of Matthew Plaise11. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs12. Ambrose13. Richard Lush14. Edmund Allen15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. Priest's Wife of Exeter49. The Final Five Martyrs50. John Hunt and Richard White51. John Fetty52. Nicholas Burton53. John Fronton54. Another Martyrdom in Spain55. Baker and Burgate56. Burges and Hoker57. The Scourged: Introduction58. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax59. Thomas Greene60. Bartlett Greene and Cotton61. Steven Cotton's Letter62. James Harris63. Robert Williams64. Bonner's Beating of Boys65. A Beggar of Salisbury66. Providences: Introduction67. The Miraculously Preserved68. William Living69. Edward Grew70. William Browne71. Elizabeth Young72. Elizabeth Lawson73. Christenmas and Wattes74. John Glover75. Dabney76. Alexander Wimshurst77. Bosom's wife78. Lady Knevet79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Edward Benet85. Jeffrey Hurst86. William Wood87. Simon Grinaeus88. The Duchess of Suffolk89. Thomas Horton 90. Thomas Sprat91. John Cornet92. Thomas Bryce93. Gertrude Crockhey94. William Mauldon95. Robert Horneby96. Mistress Sandes97. John Kempe98. Thomas Rose99. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers100. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth101. The Unprosperous Queen Mary102. Punishments of Persecutors103. Foreign Examples104. A Letter to Henry II of France105. The Death of Henry II and others106. Justice Nine-Holes107. John Whiteman108. Admonition to the Reader109. Hales' Oration110. Cautions to the Reader111. Snel112. Laremouth113. William Hunter's Letter
Critical Apparatus for this Page
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1884 [1857]

Q. Mary. Condemnation of M. Bucer and Paulus Phagius after their death.

Marginalia1557. Ianuary.132 Psalme: Beholde howe good and pleasaunt a thyng it is. &c.

Where, beginnyng firste with the commendation of concord, & of the mutuall knittyng together of the myndes, he alledged, that it was not possible to holde together, vnles the concorde were deriued out of the head, the whiche he made to be the Bishop of Rome, and that it also rested in the same.

After he had made a long protestation hereof, he passed forth to Bucer, vppon whom he made a shamefull raylyng, saying: that his doctrine gaue occasion of diuision in the common wealth, and that there was not so greeuous a mischiefe, whiche by his meanes had not bene brought into the Realme.

Although all men mighte perceiue by the bookes he had compiled, what maner of Doctrine it was: yet notwithstanding (he said) he knewe it more perfectly him self than any did, and that he had learned it apart at the authours hand hym selfe.

MarginaliaD. Pernes accusation agaynst M. Bucer.For at suche tyme as they had communication secretely among them selues, Bucer (said he) woulde oftentymes wishe he might be called by some other name, then by the name he had: for this purpose, as though knowing himself giltie of so greeuous a crime, he might by this meanes escape vnknowen to the world, and auoyd the talke that wēt among men of hym.

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MarginaliaA sore heresie noted of D. Perne.Moreouer, among other thynges, he tolde howe Bucer helde opinion (which thing he should confesse to hym his owne selfe) that God was the authour and welspryng, not onely of good, but also of euyll: and that what soeuer was of that sort, flowed from hym as from the head spring, and maker therof. The which doctrine he vpheld to be sincere: howbeit, for offending diuerse mens consciences, he durst not put it into mens heades.

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MarginaliaShamefull rayling of D. Perne agaynst M. Bucer.Many other thynges he patched together of like purport and effect, as of the supremacie of the bishop of Rome, of the mariage of Priestes, of diuorcementes, and of shamefull vsurie also, as though he had deemed the same lawfull to be vsed among Christen people, with diuers other of the like sorte.

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In all which his allegations, consideryng how lewdly without all shame he lyed vpon Bucer 

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This denunciation of Perne comes from the Historia vera and from Golding's Briefe treatise (sigs. G5r-G6v); Foxe was merely repeating. However, it is significant that while Foxe protected the identities of some prominent people involved in the exhumation and burning of the bodies of Bucer and Fagius, he did little to protect Perne's reputation.

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(as his writings euidently declare) he dyd not so muche hynder his name with raylyng vpon hym, as wynne vnto hym selfe an inexpiable infamie, by forgyng so shamefull leasinges vppon so worthy a man.

But what needeth witnes to proue hym a lyer? his owne conscience shall make as muche agaynste hym, as a number of men.

It was reported for a truth, and that by his owne familiar frendes testified, that the sayde Doctour Perne him selfe, either immediately after his Sermon, or els somwhat before he went to it, strikyng hym selfe on the brest, and in a maner weepyng, wished at home at his house with all his hart, MarginaliaD. Perne speaketh agaynst his owne conscience, in rayling agaynst M. Bucer. that God woulde graunt his soule might euen then presently departe and remayne with Bucers. For he knewe well enough that his lyfe was suche, that if any mans soule were worthy of heauen, he thought his in especially to be most worthy.

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Whiles he was thus talking to the people, in the meane tyme the leaues of the Churche doores were couered ouer with verses: MarginaliaVerses agaynst M. Bucer and Phagius. in the which the young men, to shew their folly, which scarse knew hym by sight, blased Bucers name with most reprochful Poetrie.

These thynges beyng dispatched, Perne (as though he had sped his matter marueilously well) was for his labour, of courtesie bydden to dynner to Trinitie Colledge by the Commissioners. Where, after the table was taken vp, MarginaliaThe Sentence of condemnation sent to London with the Commissioners letters.they caused the sentence of Condemnation to be copyed out with all speede: which beyng signed with the Byshop of Chesters Seale, the next day folowyng was for a triumph sent to London with diuers of those verses & sclaunderous Libelles.

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Besides this, they sent also their owne letters, wherein they both aduertised the Cardinall howe farre they had proceeded in that matter, and also desired his Grace, that he woulde cause to be sente oute of hande to Smyth the Maior of the Towne, the Commaundement, commonly called a Writte MarginaliaA writte for burning of heretickes. for the burnyng of Heretikes. For vnlesse he had the Queenes warrant to saue hym harmelcsse, he would not haue to doo in the matter: and that which remayned to be done in that case, could not be dispatched tyll that warrant came.

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Whiles thys Pursiuant went on his iorney, they willed to be brought vnto them, the bookes that they commaūded before to be serched out. For they determined to throw

them into the fire with Bucer and Phagius.

About the same tyme, Doctour Watson takyng occasion vpon the day, because it was a high Feast, in the which was wont to be celebrated the memoriall of the Purification of the blessed Virgine, made a Sermon to the people vppon that Psalme: We haue receyued thy mercye, O Lorde, in the myddest of thy Temple. &c. MarginaliaWatsons Sermon vpon Candelmas day.In the whiche Sermon he spake muche reproch of Bucer and Phagius, and of their doctrine.

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He said, that these men and all the heretikes of our time that were of the same opinion (the which for the most part he said, were budded out of Germanie,) amōg other things which they had perniciously put into mens heads, taught to caste awaye all Ceremonies. Whereas notwithstandyng the Apostle hym selfe commaunded all thynges to be done in due order.

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And vppon that deede of the blessed Virgine and Ioseph whiche was done by them as vppon that daye, it was manifestly apparaunt, that they with our Saueour being then a litle babe, obserued these rites and Ceremonies, for Catholike men to teach. MarginaliaMary and Ioseph went a procession with waxe candels, or els D. Watson sayth false.For he said, that they came to the Temple the same tyme with waxe Candles in their handes, after the maner of Procession (as they terme it) in good order, with much reuerence and deuotion: and yet we were not ashamed to laugh and mocke at these things with the heretikes and schismatikes.

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As he was tellyng his tale of Christ, Mary, and Ioseph, one of them that heard hym, a pleasant and meery conceyted felowe, turnyng hym selfe to hym that stoode nexte hym, MarginaliaA question to be spurred to D. Watson.and if it be true (quoth he) that this man preacheth, which of them I pray you (if a man might spurre hym a question) bare the Crosse before them? for that might not be missing in such solemne ceremonies. Not only this man iested at the Preachers folly, but diuers other also laughed at his manifest vnshamefastnes, in preaching these so vayne and foolish superstitions.

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While he was thus talkyng to his audience, Iohn Christopherson elected Bishop of Chichester, MarginaliaThe sodayne sownde of Christopherson.being striken with a sodayne sicknes, fell downe in a sounde among the preasse, 

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I.e., Christopherson fainted in the crowd.

and with muche adoo, being scarse able a good while to come to hym selfe agayne, in the meane tyme babled many thynges vnaduisedly, and as though he had bene out of his wyttes. Some thought it came vppon this occasion, because he had bene greatly accused before the Commissioners for mispending and misorderyng the goods of the Colledge, and therefore was greeued with the matter, knowyng that they had bene offended with hym, by that that Ormanet had cancelled before his face a Lease of his, by the which he had let to ferme to his brother in Law a certayne Manor of that Colledge, because the couenants seemed vnreasonable.

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By this tyme was returned agayne the Pursiuant, who (as we before told) was sent to London wt the Commissioners letters, and brought with hym a warrant for the burning of these men.

MarginaliaThe day assigned for burning of Martyn Bucer and Paulus Phagius bodyes.Vpon the receite wherof they appoynted the sixt day of February for the accomplishment of the matter. For it had hanged already a great while in hand.

Therfore when the said day was come, the Commissioners sent for the Vicechauncellour, demaunding of hym in what case things stood, whether all things were in a readynes for the accomplishment of this busines, or no. Vnderstandyng by hym that all thinges were ready, they commaunded the matter to be broched out of hand.

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The Vicechancellor therfore taking with hym Marshal the cōmon Notary, went first to S. Michaels church, wher Phagius was buried. There he called forth Andrew Smith, Henry Sawyer, & Hen. Adams, men of the same parish, MarginaliaThe taking vp of Martyn Bucer and Paulus Phagius.and bound them with an othe, to dyg vp Phagius bones, and to bring them to the place of execution. Marshall tooke their othes, receiuyng the like of Roger Smith, and W. Hasell, the towne Sergeants, & of Iohn Capper, Wardē of the same church, for doing þe like with Bucer. Smith the Maior of the towne, which should be their executioner, (for it was not lawfull for them to intermeddle in cases of bloud) 

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Clerics were not allowed to carry out corporal punishments for heresy themselves; that had to be delegated to the secular authorities, even if the punishments were being inflicted on dead bodies.

commaunded certayne of his townesmen to wayte vpon hym in harnesse, by whom the dead bodyes were garded, and beyng bound with ropes, & layd vpon mens shoulders (for they were enclosed in chestes, Bucer in the same that he was buryed, and Phagius in a newe) they were borne into the middest of þe marketsteede with a great traine of people folowyng them.

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MarginaliaThe burning of Mart. Bucer and Paulus Phagius.This place was prepared before, and a greate Poste was set faste in the grounde, to bynde the carcasses to, and a great heape of woode was layde readye to burne them withall.

When they came thyther, the Chestes were set vp on ende, with the deade bodyes in them, and fastened on both

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