Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Alice Benden and other martyrs10. Examinations of Matthew Plaise11. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs12. Ambrose13. Richard Lush14. Edmund Allen15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. Priest's Wife of Exeter49. The Final Five Martyrs50. John Hunt and Richard White51. John Fetty52. Nicholas Burton53. John Fronton54. Another Martyrdom in Spain55. Baker and Burgate56. Burges and Hoker57. The Scourged: Introduction58. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax59. Thomas Greene60. Bartlett Greene and Cotton61. Steven Cotton's Letter62. James Harris63. Robert Williams64. Bonner's Beating of Boys65. A Beggar of Salisbury66. Providences: Introduction67. The Miraculously Preserved68. William Living69. Edward Grew70. William Browne71. Elizabeth Young72. Elizabeth Lawson73. Christenmas and Wattes74. John Glover75. Dabney76. Alexander Wimshurst77. Bosom's wife78. Lady Knevet79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Edward Benet85. Jeffrey Hurst86. William Wood87. Simon Grinaeus88. The Duchess of Suffolk89. Thomas Horton 90. Thomas Sprat91. John Cornet92. Thomas Bryce93. Gertrude Crockhey94. William Mauldon95. Robert Horneby96. Mistress Sandes97. John Kempe98. Thomas Rose99. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers100. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth101. The Unprosperous Queen Mary102. Punishments of Persecutors103. Foreign Examples104. A Letter to Henry II of France105. The Death of Henry II and others106. Justice Nine-Holes107. John Whiteman108. Admonition to the Reader109. Hales' Oration110. Cautions to the Reader111. Snel112. Laremouth113. William Hunter's Letter
Critical Apparatus for this Page
Commentary on the TextCommentary on the Woodcuts
Names and Places on this Page
Unavailable for this Edition
1955 [1928]

Q. Mary. Persecution in Norfolke. Seaman, Carman. Hudson, Martyrs.

MarginaliaAnno. 1558. Maie.Seaman answered, deniyng it to be a Sacrament, but said it was an Idoll, and therfore would not receiue it. After whiche wordes spoken, sir Iohn Tirrell shortly sent hym to Norwich to Hopton then bishop, MarginaliaSeaman brought to Bishop Hopton, and by hym condemned.and there after conference and examination had with hym, the bishop red his bloudy sentence of condemnation against hym, and afterward deliuered hym to the Secular power, who kept hym vnto the daie of Martyrdome.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaSeamans wife and his three yong children, were persecuted also by sir Ihon Tirrell.This saied William Seaman lefte behinde hym when he died, a wife, and three children very yong: and with the saied yonge children, his wife was persecuted out of the said toune also of Mendlesham, because that she would not go to heare Masse, and all her corne and goodes seased, and taken awaie by master Christopher Coles officers, he beyng lorde of the saied toune.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThomas Carman, Martyr.Thomas Carmā (who, as is said, pledged Richard Crashfield at his burnyng, and thereupon was apprehended) 

Commentary  *  Close

See 1563, p. 1617; 1570, p. 2206; 1576, p. 1904 and 1583, p. 2012.

beeyng prisoner in Norwiche, was about one tyme with the rest examined and brought before þe saied Bishop, who aunswered no lesse in his maisters cause, then the other, and therefore had the like rewarde, that the other had, MarginaliaCarman condemned.which was the Bishops bloudy blessyng of condemnation, and deliuered also to the Seculare power, who kepte hym with the other, vntill the daie of slaughter, whiche hasted on, and was not long after.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThomas Hudson, Martyr.Thomas Hudson was of Ailesham in Norfolk, by his occupation a Glouer, a very honest poore man, hauyng a wife, and iij. children, and laboured alwaies truly and diligentely in his vocation, beyng of. xxx. yeres of age, and bearyng so good a will to the Gospell, that he in the daies of kyng Edward the. vi, twoo yeres before Queene Maries raigne, MarginaliaHudson learneth to reade Englishe.learned to reade Englishe of Anthonie and Thomas Norgate of the same Toune, wherein he greatly profited about the tyme of alteratiō of religion. For when Queene Mary came to raigne, and had chaunged the seruice in the churche, puttyng in for wheate, draffe and darnill, and for good preachyng blasphemous criyng out against truthe, and godlines, MarginaliaHudson flieth frō Papistrie.he then auoidyng all their beggerly Ceremonies of superstition, absented hym self from his house, and wente into Suffolke a long tyme, and there remained, trauelyng from one place to an other, as occasion was offered. At the last, he returned backe again to Norfolke, to his house at Ailesham, to comforte his wife and his children, beyng heauie, and troubled with his absence.

[Back to Top]

Now when he came home, and perceiued his continuaunce there would bee daungerous, he and his wife deuised to make hym a place among his fagots, to hide hym self in, where he remained all the daie (in steede of his chamber) readyng and praiyng continually, for the space of halfe a yere, and his wife like an honest womā beyng carefull for hym, vsed her self faithfully, and diligently towardes hym.

[Back to Top]

In the meane tyme came the Vicare of the Toune, named Berry MarginaliaBerry the Cōmissarie, a persecutour. (who was one of the Bishoppes Commissaries, a verie euill man) and inquired of this saied Thomas Hudsons wife, for her houseband. Vnto whō she aunswered, as not knowyng were he was. Then the saied Berry rated her, and threatened to burne her, for that she would not bewraie her housebande where he was. MarginaliaHudsō waxeth bolde in the truthe.After that, whē Hudson vnderstoode it, he waxed euery daie more zealous then other, and continually read and sang Psalmes, to the wonder of many, the people openly resortyng to hym, to heare his exhortations, and vehement praiers.

[Back to Top]

At the laste he walked abroad for certaine daies, openly in the Toune, criyng out continually against the Masse, and all their trumperie, and in the ende, commyng home in his house, he satte hym doune vpon his knees, hauyng his booke by hym, readyng and singing Psalmes continually without ceassyng, for three daies and three nightes together, refusyng meate and other talke, to the greate wonder of many.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaIohn Crouch bewraieth Thomas Hudson to the Constables.Then one Ihō Crouch his next neighbor, went to the Constables Robert Marsham, and Robert Lawes in the night, to certifie thē therof: for Berry commaunded openly to watche for him: & the Constables vnderstādyng the same, went cruelly to catch him in þe breake of the daie, the. xxij. of the moneth of Aprill. Anno. 1558.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe takyng of Tho. Hudson.Nowe when Hudson sawe them come in, he saied: Now myne hower is come. Welcome frēdes welcome: You bee they that shall leade me to life in Christe, I thanke God therefore, and the Lorde enhable me therto for his mercies sake. For his desire was, and euer he praied (if it were the Lordes will) that he might suffer for the Gospell of Christe. Then they tooke hym, and

[Back to Top]

leade hym to Berry the Commissarie, whiche was Vicare of the toune, MarginaliaTalke betwene Berry and Hudson.and the saied Berry asked hym first: where he kept his Churche for fower yeres before. To the whiche the saied Hudson aunswered thus: where so euer he was, there was the Churche.

Doest thou not beleue, saieth Berry, in the Sacrament of the altar? What is it?

Hudson. MarginaliaSacrament of the altar.It is wormes meate: my beliefe (saith he) is in Christ crucified.

Berry. Doest thou not beleeue the Masse to put away sinnes?

Hudson. MarginaliaThe Masse.No, God forbid: it is a patched monstre, and a disguised Puppet, more longer a pecing then euer was Salomons Tēple. At which wordes Berry stamped, fumed, and shewed hym selfe as a mad man, and sayde: well thou villayne, thou: I will write to the bishop my good Lord, and trust vnto it, thou shalt be handled accordyng to thy desertes. Oh syr, saide Hudson: there is no Lord but God, though there be many Lordes and many Gods. With that, Berry thrust hym backe with his hand. And one MarginaliaRichard Cliffar.Richard Cliffar standyng by, saide: I pray you syr, be good to the poore manne. At whiche woordes Berry was more mad then before, and would haue had Cliffar bound in a recognisance of 40. poundes for his good abearyng, both in woorde and deede: which his desire toke no effect. Then he asked the said Hudson whether he would recant or no. Vnto whiche wordes Hudson said: the Lord forbid: I had rather dye many deathes, then to doe so.

[Back to Top]

Then after long talke, the said Berry seyng it booted not to perswade with him, tooke his pen and ynke, and wrote letters to the Byshop thereof, and sent this Hudson to Norwich bound like a theefe to hym, which was. viij. miles from thence, who with ioy and singing chere went thether, as mery as euer he was at any tyme before. In prison he was a moneth, where he did continually read and inuocate the name of God.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaSeaman, Carman, and Hudson, condemned at Norwiche.These thre christians and constant Martyrs, William Seaman, Thomas Carman, and Tho. Hudson, after they were (as ye haue heard) condemned, the xix. day of May. 1558. were caried out of prison to the place where they should suffer, which was without Bishops gate at Norwich, called Lollards Pit. And beeing all there, they made their humble praiers vnto the Lorde. That beyng done, they rose and went to the stake, and standyng all there with their chaines about them, MarginaliaThomas Hudson commeth from vnder the chaine to praie.immediatly this saied Thomas Hudson commeth forthe from them vnder the Chaine, to the greate wonder of manie: whereby diuers feared and greatly doubted of

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of William Seaman, Thomas Carman, and Thomas Hudson, at Norwiche. Anno. 1558. Maie. 19.Three Godly Martyrs burned at Norwich.
woodcut [View a larger version]
Commentary on the Woodcuts  *  Close
Another example of the lack of a block to illustrate three men in one pyre.

hym.
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield