Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Alice Benden and other martyrs10. Examinations of Matthew Plaise11. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs12. Ambrose13. Richard Lush14. Edmund Allen15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. Priest's Wife of Exeter49. The Final Five Martyrs50. John Hunt and Richard White51. John Fetty52. Nicholas Burton53. John Fronton54. Another Martyrdom in Spain55. Baker and Burgate56. Burges and Hoker57. The Scourged: Introduction58. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax59. Thomas Greene60. Bartlett Greene and Cotton61. Steven Cotton's Letter62. James Harris63. Robert Williams64. Bonner's Beating of Boys65. A Beggar of Salisbury66. Providences: Introduction67. The Miraculously Preserved68. William Living69. Edward Grew70. William Browne71. Elizabeth Young72. Elizabeth Lawson73. Christenmas and Wattes74. John Glover75. Dabney76. Alexander Wimshurst77. Bosom's wife78. Lady Knevet79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Edward Benet85. Jeffrey Hurst86. William Wood87. Simon Grinaeus88. The Duchess of Suffolk89. Thomas Horton 90. Thomas Sprat91. John Cornet92. Thomas Bryce93. Gertrude Crockhey94. William Mauldon95. Robert Horneby96. Mistress Sandes97. John Kempe98. Thomas Rose99. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers100. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth101. The Unprosperous Queen Mary102. Punishments of Persecutors103. Foreign Examples104. A Letter to Henry II of France105. The Death of Henry II and others106. Justice Nine-Holes107. John Whiteman108. Admonition to the Reader109. Hales' Oration110. Cautions to the Reader111. Snel112. Laremouth113. William Hunter's Letter
Critical Apparatus for this Page
Commentary on the TextCommentary on the Woodcuts
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1959 [1932]

Q. Mary. Vij. Martyrs burned in Smithfield. Examinatiō of Rog. Hollād.

MarginaliaAnno. 1558. Iune.saying that whatsoeuer he and such other now a daies doe, all is heresie: for this he was condemned with the same butcherly Sentence, and so by the secular power was sent away.

Then Robert Southam, after hym Mathew Ricarby, and last of all Roger Holland were seuerally produced.

MarginaliaThe condemnation of Robert Southam, Mathew Ricarby, & Roger Holland.Thus Roger Holland with hys fellowes (as ye heard) standing to their aunsweres, and refusing to acknowledge the doctrine of the Romishe churche, who were altogether condemned, the sentence beyng red against them, and so all the 7. by secular magistrates being sent away to Newgate the 17. of Iune, not long af-

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MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of Henry Ponde, Raynold Eastland, Robert Southam, Mathew Ricarby, Iohn Floyd, Iohn Holiday, Roger Holland, in Smithfield. An. 1558. Iune. 27.The burnyng of vij. godly Martyrs in Smithfield.
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Another example of the quest for full illustration overriding full provision (Day had no cut for seven in one pyre).

ter about the 27. of þe sayd moneth were had to Smithfield, and there ended their liues in the glorious cause of Christes Gospell. Whose particular examinations came not to our handes: sauing only the examinations of Roger Holland, whiche here followe in order and maner, as we receaued them by the information of certayne who were present at the same.

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¶ The examinations and condemnation of Roger Holland. 
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This short biography of Holland first appeared in the 1570 edition and it is based on Holland's account of his examinations and the testimony of someone who knew him. Elizabeth Holland, Roger's wife, is likely to have had a copy of Holland's examinations and she certainly knew him. But the uncertainty as to the identity of the kinsman who left her an important legacy rules her out as Foxe'ssource. But the source was clearly close to Elizabeth as well as Roger Holland.

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MarginaliaThe first examinatiō of Roger Holland.THis Roger Holland a marchāt Taylor of Lōdon, was first prentise with one master Kempton at the black boy in Watling streete, where he serued his prentiship with much trouble vnto his maister in breaking him from his licencious libertie which he had before beene trayned and brought vp in, geuing himselfe to riot, as dauncing, fence, gaming, banquetting, and wanton companie: and besides all this, being a stubborne and an obstinate Papist, farre vnlike to come to any suche ende as God called him vnto: the which was as followeth.

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His master, notwithstanding this his leudnes, putting him in trust wt his accomptes, he had receaued for him certayne money, to the summe of xxx. pounds, and falling into ill cōpany, lost the sayd money euery grote at dice, beyng past all hope which way to aunswere it, and therefore he purposed to cōuey him selfe away beyond the seas, either into Fraunce or into Flaunders.

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Now hauing determined with him selfe thus to doe, he called betymes in the morning to a seruaunt in the house, an auncient and discrete mayde, whose name was Elizabeth, which professed the Gospell, with a life agreeing vnto the same, & at all times much rebuking the wilfull and obstinate papistrie, as also the licencious liuing of this Roger Holland. To whom he

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said: Elizabeth I would I had followed thy gētle perswasions and frendly rebukes: which if I had done, I had neuer come to this shame and miserie which I am now fallen into: for this night haue I lost xxx. pounde of my masters monie, whiche to pay hym and to make vp myne accomptes, I am not able. But thus much I pray you desire my mistres, that she would intreat my master to take this bil of my hād, that I am thus much indebted vnto hym, and if I be euer hable, I will see him payed, desiring him that the matter may passe with silence, and that none of my kinred nor frendes neuer vnderstand this my leude part. For if it should come vnto my fathers eares, it would bring his gray heares ouer soone vnto his graue: and so was he departing.

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The mayde cōsidering that it might be his vtter vndoing: stay sayd she, and hauing a peece of money lying by her, geuen vnto her by the death of a kinsman of hers, who (as it is thought, was Doct. Redman) she brought vnto hym xxx. pounde, saying: Roger, here is thus much money: I will let thee haue it, and I will keepe this bill. MarginaliaA godly example of a mayde, setting more by the soule of a Christen brother, thē by her money.But since I doe thus much for thee, to helpe thee and to saue thy honestie, thou shalt promise me to refuse al leude and wylde companie, al swearing and ribaldry talke: and if I euer know the to play one xij. d. at eyther dice or cardes, then I will shew thys thy bill vnto my master. And furthermore thou shalt promise me to resort euery day to þe lecture at Alhallowes, and the sermon at Paules euery Sonday, and to cast away all thy bookes of papistry and vayne ballets, & get thee the testamēt and the booke of seruice, and read the scriptures with reuerence and feare, calling vnto God still for his grace to direct thee in his truth. And pray vnto God feruently desiring hym to pardon thy former offences, and not to remember the sinnes of thy youth: and euer be afrayd to breake hys lawes or offend his maiestie. Then shall God keepe thee and send thee thy hartes desire.

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MarginaliaRoger Hollād brought to the loue of the Gospell.After this tyme, within one halfe yeare God had wrought such a chaunge in this man that hee was become an earnest professor of the truth, and detested all Papistrie and euill companie: so that he was in admiration to all them that had knowen him and seene his former life and wickednes.

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Then hee repayred into Lankeshiere vnto hys father, and brought diuers good bookes with him, and bestowed them vppon his frendes, MarginaliaRoger Hollād conuerteth his parentes to the Gospell.so that hys father and others began to tast of the Gospell and detest the Masse, idolatrie, and superstition: and in the ende hys father gaue him a stocke of money to begin the world withall, to the summe of fiftie pound.

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Then he repayred to Lndon againe, and came to the mayde that lent hym the money to pay hys master withall, & sayd vnto her: Elizabeth, here is thy money I borrowed of thee, MarginaliaRoger Hollād repayeth the maide her money againe, and maryeth her.and for the frendship, good will, and the good counsell I haue receaued at thy handes, to recompence thee I am not able, otherwise then to make thee my wife: and soone after they were marryed, whiche was in the first yeare of Queene Marie: And hauing a childe by her, he caused Master Rose 

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Thomas Rose; see 1576, pp. 1977-79 and 1583, pp. 2083-85.

to baptise hys sayd childe in his owne house. MarginaliaHollandes childe Christened in hys house. Notwithstanding hee was bewrayed vnto the enemyes, and he being gone into the countrey to conuey the child away that the papistes should not haue it in their anointing handes, Boner caused his goodes to be seased vpon, and most cruelly vsed his wife.

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After this he remayned closely in the Citie and in the countrey in the congregations of the faithfull, vntill the last yeare of Queene Marie. Then he with the vi. other aforesayd, were taken in or not farre from S. Iohns wood, MarginaliaRoger Hollād brought to Newgate.and so brought to Newgate vppon May daie in the morning. an. 1558.

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Then beyng called before the Bishop, D. Chedsey, both the Harpsfieldes, and certaine other, after many other fayre and craftie persuasions of Doct. Chedsey to allure him to their Babilonicall Church: thus the Byshop began with him.

Holland, I for my part do wish well vnto thee, and the more for thy frendes sake. And as Doct. Standish telleth me, you and he were both borne in one Parish, and hee knoweth your father to be a verie honest Catholicke Gentleman. And M. Doctour told me that he talked with you a yeare a go, and found you very wilfully addict to your owne conceite. Diuers of the Citie also haue shewed me of you, that you haue bene a great procurer of mens seruantes to be of your Religiō, and to come to your congregations: but since you be now

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