Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Alice Benden and other martyrs10. Examinations of Matthew Plaise11. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs12. Ambrose13. Richard Lush14. Edmund Allen15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. Priest's Wife of Exeter49. The Final Five Martyrs50. John Hunt and Richard White51. John Fetty52. Nicholas Burton53. John Fronton54. Another Martyrdom in Spain55. Baker and Burgate56. Burges and Hoker57. The Scourged: Introduction58. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax59. Thomas Greene60. Bartlett Greene and Cotton61. Steven Cotton's Letter62. James Harris63. Robert Williams64. Bonner's Beating of Boys65. A Beggar of Salisbury66. Providences: Introduction67. The Miraculously Preserved68. William Living69. Edward Grew70. William Browne71. Elizabeth Young72. Elizabeth Lawson73. Christenmas and Wattes74. John Glover75. Dabney76. Alexander Wimshurst77. Bosom's wife78. Lady Knevet79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Edward Benet85. Jeffrey Hurst86. William Wood87. Simon Grinaeus88. The Duchess of Suffolk89. Thomas Horton 90. Thomas Sprat91. John Cornet92. Thomas Bryce93. Gertrude Crockhey94. William Mauldon95. Robert Horneby96. Mistress Sandes97. John Kempe98. Thomas Rose99. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers100. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth101. The Unprosperous Queen Mary102. Punishments of Persecutors103. Foreign Examples104. A Letter to Henry II of France105. The Death of Henry II and others106. Justice Nine-Holes107. John Whiteman108. Admonition to the Reader109. Hales' Oration110. Cautions to the Reader111. Snel112. Laremouth113. William Hunter's Letter
Critical Apparatus for this Page
Commentary on the Text
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1980 [1953]

Q. Mary. The scourging of Thomas Greene, Prentise.

Marginalia1558.vnto the Lord Maior, & to Syr Roger Cholmley, to know their offences, and that they might be deliuered.

MarginaliaSute made by the company of Drapers for Richard Wilmot and Tho Fayrefaxe.At length they procured the Wardens of the company of Drapers to labour with them in their sute to the Maior. The Maior went with them to the Counsell: but at that tyme they could finde no grace at Winchesters hand and Syr Anthony Brownes, but that they had deserued death, and that they should haue the law.

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At length through intreataunce, he graūted them thus much fauour, that they should not dye as they had deserued, but should be tyed to a cartes tayle, and be whipped three market dayes thorough the Citie. Thus they came home that day, and went an other day, and the Maior and the Wardens of the company kneeled before them to haue this open punishmēt released, for as much as they were seruauntes of so worshypfull a company, and that they might be punished in their owne hall before the Wardens and certaine of the company. At length it was graunted, with condition, as some sayd, as shalbe hereafter declared.

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Then were they sent before the Maisters the next day, to the Hall, both their maisters being also present, and there were layde to their charges, the heynous offences by them committed, how they were both heretickes and traytours, and had deserued death for the same, and this was declared with a long processe by the Maister of the company, MarginaliaM. Brooke Master of the company of Drapers.whose name was M. Brooke, declaryng what great labour & sute the Maior and the Wardens had for them, to saue them frō death, which they (as he sayd) had deserued, and from open shame, whiche they should haue had, beyng iudged by the Counsaile to haue bene whipped iij. dayes through the Citie at a Cartes tayle, and from these two daungers had they laboured to deliuer them, but not without great sute and also charge. For, sayth he, the cōpany hath promised vnto the Counsaile for this their mercy and fauour shewed towards them, beyng of such a worshypfull company, a hundreth poundes: notwithstandyng we must see them punished in our Hall within our selues for those their offences. After these and many other wordes, he commaunded them to addresse themselues to receaue their punishment.

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MarginaliaRich. Wilmot and Thomas Fayrefaxe scourged in Drapers Hall.Then were they put asunder, and stripped from the wast vpward, one after an other, and had into the Hall, and in the middest of the Hall, where they vse to make their fire, there was a great ryng of Iron, to the whiche there was a rope tyed fast, and one of their feete thereto fast tyed.

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Then came two men down, disguised in Mommers apparell, with visors on their faces, and they beate them with great rods vntill the bloud did follow in their bodyes.

As concernyng this Wilmot, he could not lye in his bed vj. nightes after: for Brooke MarginaliaBrooke a cruell tyrant. played the tyraunt with them. So it was, that with the beatyng and the flight, and feare, they were neuer in health since, as the sayd Wilmot with his owne mouth hath credibly ascertained vs, and we cā no lesse but testifie the same.

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Thus haue we briefly rehearsed this litle tragedy, wherin ye may note the malice of the enemies at all tymes to those which professe Christ, and take his part, of what estate or degree soeuer they be, accordyng to the Apostles saying: It is geuen vnto you not onely to beleue, but also to suffer with him. To whom be honour and glory, Amen.

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>Next after these two aboue specified, followeth the beatyng of one Thomas Greene, who in the tyme of Queene Mary, was caused likewise to be scourged & beatē by Doctour Story. What the cause was, here followeth in story & examination to be sene, which he penned with his own hād, as the thyng it selfe will declare to the reader. The copy and wordes of the same as he wrote them, here follow. Wherein as thou mayest note (gentle reader) the simplicitie of the one, so I pray thee, marke agayne the crueltie of the other part.

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¶ The scourgyng of Thomas Greene.

MarginaliaThe scourging of Tho. Greene.IN the reigne of Queene Mary, I Thomas Greene beyng brought before D. Story, by my maister MarginaliaThe master promoteth his seruaunt. whose name is Iohn Wayland a Printer, for a booke called Antichrist,  

Commentary  *  Close

The book is almost certainly John Olde's translation of Rudolph Gualter's Antichrist (STC 25009), printed in Emden in 1556.

the whiche had bene distributed to certaine honest men: he asked me where I had the booke, and sayd I was a traytour. I told him I had the booke of a Frenchman. Then he asked me more questions, but I told him I would tell him no more, nor could not. Then he sayd: it was no heresie but treason, and that I should be hanged, drawen, and quartered, and so he called for Cluny the Keeper of the Lollardes Tower, MarginaliaTho. Greene put in the stockes.and bad him set me fast in the stockes.

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I was not in the Lollards Tower two houres, but Cluny came and tooke me out, MarginaliaTho. Greene brought to the Colehouse.and caryed me to the Colehouse, and there I found a Frenchman lying in the stockes, and he tooke him out, and put on my right legge a bolt and a fetter, & on my left hand an other, and so he set me crosss fettered in the stockes, and tooke the Frenchman away with

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him, and there I lay a day and a night. On the morrow after, he came and sayd: let vs shift your hand and legge, because you shall not be lame: and he made as though he pitied me, and sayd: tell me the truth, and I will be your frend.

And I sayd, I had told the truth and would tell no other. Then he put no more but my legge in the stockes, and so went his way, and there I remained vj. dayes, and could come to no aunswere.

MarginaliaThomas Greene examined before D. Story.Then Doctour Story sent for me, and asked whether I would tell him the truth, where I had the booke. I sayd I had told him, of a Frenchman. Hee asked me where I came acquainted with the Frenchmā, and where he dwelt, and where he deliuered me the booke. I sayd: I came acquainted with him in Newgate, I commyng to my frendes which were put in for Gods word and truthes sake, and the Frenchman commyng to his frendes also: there we did talke together and became acquainted one with an other, and did eate and drinke together there with our frendes in the feare of God.

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MarginaliaD. Story scoffeth at Christes seruauntes.Then Story scoffed at me and sayd: thē there was brother in Christ, and brother in Christ, and reuiled me and called me an hereticke, and asked me if I had the booke of hym in Newgate. I sayd no, and I told him, as I went on my businesse in the streete I met him, and hee asked me how I dyd, and I him also: so fallyng in communication, hee shewed me that booke, and I desired him that he would let me haue it.

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In this examination Story sayd, it was a great booke, and asked me whether I bought it, or had it geuen me. I told him, I bought it. Then sayd he, I was a theefe, and had stollen my Maisters money. And I sayd: a litle money serued, for I gaue him but fower pence, but I promised him at our next meetyng I would geue twelue pence more. And he sayd: that was boldly done, for such a booke as spake both treason and heresie.

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Then Story required me to bryng him two sureties, and watche for him that I had the booke of, and I should haue no harme. I made him aunswere, I would bryng no sureties, nor I could not tell where to finde them. Then sayd he: this is but a lye, & so called for Cluny, and bad hym lay me fast in the Colehouse, saying, he would make me tell an other tale at my next commyng: & so I lay in the stockes day and night, but onely when I eate my meate, and there remayned x. dayes before I was called for agayne.

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MarginaliaAn other examination of Tho. Greene before D. Story.Then Doctour Story sent for me agayne, and asked if I would yet tell him the truth. I sayd, I could tell him no other truth then I had, nor would. And while I was there standyng, there were two brought, whiche I tooke to be prisoners.

MarginaliaMistres Story sheweth her charitable hart.Then mistres Story fell in a rage, and sware a great othe, that it were a good deede to put a hundred or ij. of these hereticke knaues in a house, & I my selfe (sayth she) would set it a fire. So I was cōmitted to prison agayne, where I remained xiiij. dayes and came to no aunswere.

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MarginaliaGreene agayne examined before D. Story.Then Story sent for me agayne, and called me into the garden, and there I founde with him my Lord of Windsores Caplaine, and two Gentlemen more, and he told them all what I had sayd and done. They sayd: the booke was a wonderous euill booke, and had both treason and heresie in it. Then they asked me what I sayd by the booke. And I sayd: I knew no euill by it.

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At which wordes Story chafed, and said he would hāg me vp by the handes with a rope, and sayd also he would cut out my toung, and mine eares also from my head. After this they alledged two or three thynges vnto me out of the booke: and I aūswered, I had not read the booke through out, and therfore I could geue no iudgement of the booke.

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Then my Lord of Windsores Chaplaine and the other two Gentlemen tooke me aside, and entreated me very gently, saying: tell vs where you had the booke, and of whom: we will saue you harmeles. I made them aunswere, I had told all that I could to Doctour Story, and began to tell it them agayne: but they sayd, they knew þt already. So they left that talke, and went agayne to Story with me.

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MarginaliaGreene examined of his belief.Then Story burdened me with my fayth, and sayd I was an hereticke. Whereupon the Chaplaine asked me how I did beleue. Then I began to rehearse the Articles of my beliefe, but he bad me let that alone. Then he asked me how I beleued in Christ. I made him aunswere, that I beleued in Christ which dyed and rose agayne the third day, and sitteth on the right hand of God the father.

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MarginaliaD Stories blasphemous scoffing in matters of our fayth.Whereupon Story asked me mockyngly, what is the right hand of God? I made hym aunswere, I thought it was his glory. Then sayd he: so they say all. And he asked me when he would be wery of sittyng there. Then inferred my Lord of Windsors Chaplaine, askyng me what I sayd by the Masse. I said: I neuer knew what it was, nor what it mēt, for I vnderstode it not, because I neuer learned any

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Latin,
PPPPp.i.
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