Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Alice Benden and other martyrs10. Examinations of Matthew Plaise11. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs12. Ambrose13. Richard Lush14. Edmund Allen15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. Priest's Wife of Exeter49. The Final Five Martyrs50. John Hunt and Richard White51. John Fetty52. Nicholas Burton53. John Fronton54. Another Martyrdom in Spain55. Baker and Burgate56. Burges and Hoker57. The Scourged: Introduction58. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax59. Thomas Greene60. Bartlett Greene and Cotton61. Steven Cotton's Letter62. James Harris63. Robert Williams64. Bonner's Beating of Boys65. A Beggar of Salisbury66. Providences: Introduction67. The Miraculously Preserved68. William Living69. Edward Grew70. William Browne71. Elizabeth Young72. Elizabeth Lawson73. Christenmas and Wattes74. John Glover75. Dabney76. Alexander Wimshurst77. Bosom's wife78. Lady Knevet79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Edward Benet85. Jeffrey Hurst86. William Wood87. Simon Grinaeus88. The Duchess of Suffolk89. Thomas Horton 90. Thomas Sprat91. John Cornet92. Thomas Bryce93. Gertrude Crockhey94. William Mauldon95. Robert Horneby96. Mistress Sandes97. John Kempe98. Thomas Rose99. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers100. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth101. The Unprosperous Queen Mary102. Punishments of Persecutors103. Foreign Examples104. A Letter to Henry II of France105. The Death of Henry II and others106. Justice Nine-Holes107. John Whiteman108. Admonition to the Reader109. Hales' Oration110. Cautions to the Reader111. Snel112. Laremouth113. William Hunter's Letter
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1995 [1932]

Q> M> Diuers saued by Gods prouidence frō burning in Q. Maries time.

MarginaliaAnno. 1558.daye ommyng toward England, they chaunced into the same Inne at the next Towne, where they found their young child sittyng by the fire side.

¶ Edward Benet.

MarginaliaA story of Edward Bent, now dwelling in S Brides parishe.ONe Edw. Benet about þe second yeare of the reigne of Q. Mary, then dwelling at Quenehiue with one Grynocke a Baker, was desired of one Tyngle prisoner then in Newgate, to bryng him a new Testament. He procuring one of M. Couerdals translation, wrapt it in a handkerchef, saiyng to George the keeper which asked him what he had, that it was a peece of poudred beefe. Let me see it, said he. Perceiuing what it was, he brought hym to Syr Roger Cholmley, who examined him why he did so, saiyng that booke was not lawfull, and so committed him to the Counter in Woodstreete, where he continued xxv. weekes. MarginaliaEdward Benet xxv. weekes in the Counter, for bringyng a new Testamēt to Tyngle, which after died in prison, and was buried on a dounghill.

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D. Story commyng to the prison to examine other prisoners, this Benet looking out at the grate, spake to hym, desiryng him to be good vnto him, and to helpe him out, for he had layne long in prison. To whom D. Story then aunsweryng: MarginaliaDoct. Stories wordes to Edward Benet.What, said he, wast not thou before me in Christes Church? Yes forsooth, said Benet. Ah, said Story, thou doest not beleeue in the Sacrament of the Aultar. Mary I will helpe thee out: come, said he to the keeper, turne, him out, I will helpe him: and so tooke Benet with hym and brought hym to Cluny in Pater noster Rowe, and bad him bring him to the Colehouse, and there he was in the stockes a weke.

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MarginaliaEdward Benet brought to Boner and examined.Then the Bishoppe sent for him to talke with him, and first asked hym if he were shriuen? No, sayd Benet. He asked him if he would be shriuen? No, said he. Then he asked hym if the Priest could take away hys sinnes? No, sayd Benet, I do not so beleue. Then he and Harpsfield laughed at hym and mocked hym, askyng him if hee did not beleeue that what soeuer the priest here bound in earth, should be bound in heauen: and whatsoeuer he loosed in earth, should be loosed in heauen? No, quod Benet: But I beleue that the minister of God preaching Gods woord truely, and ministring the Sacramentes accordyng to the same, what soeuer he bindeth in earth, shall be bound in heauen, and what soeuer he looseth. &c. Then the Bishop putting hym aside, said, he should go to Fulham and be whipped.

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Then came to him. M. Buswel a Priest, liyng in the Colehouse in the stockes, and brought Cranmers recantation, saiyng that he had recanted. My faith, saith the other, lieth in no mās booke but in him which hath redeemed me. The next Saterday Benet with fiue others was called for to come to masse, into the Chapel. MarginaliaHow Edward Benet escaped out of the Bishops house.The Masse beyng done aud they commyng out, fiue of them went to prison and were after burned. Benet beyng behind and commyng toward the gate, the porter openyng to a company goyng out, asked if there were no prisoners there. No, said they. Benet standyng in open sight before hym, with other seruing men whiche were there by reason that Boner made many Priestes that day (hauyng one of his sleues & halfe the fore part of his coate burned of in the prison, beyng more like a prisoner then any of the other) when the gate was opened, went out amongest them, and so escaped.

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MarginaliaAn other escape of Edw. Benet.Againe, in the last yeare of Queene Mary, the same Benet beyng taken againe with the xxiiij. MarginaliaOf these xxiiii. read before pag. 1930. beyond Islington, and brought to Syr Roger Cholmleys, the people commyng very thicke did cut of some of them, to the number of viij, which were behind, among whom was Benet. MarginaliaViii. of the xxiiii. taken at Islington escaped and how. Then he knocking at the gate to come in, the Porter said, that he was none of the company. Hee sayd yes, and knocked againe. Then there stode one by of the congregation, named Iohnson, dwellyng nowe at Hamersmith, which said: MarginaliaGood warning sent of God.Edwarde, thou hast done well, do not tempt God, go thy way. And so takyng the warnyng as sent of GOD, with a quiet conscience eschued burnyng.

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¶ Ieffrey Hurst brother in law to George Marshe the Martyr.

MarginaliaThe story of Ieffrey Hurst dwelling in the towne of Shakerley in the Parish of Leaght.IN the Toune of Shakerley in Lancashire dwelled one Ieffrey Hurst the son of an honest yeoman, who had besides him a xi. children, the said Ieffrey being the xij. and eldest of the rest: and for that their father being willing to bring them vp, so that they should be able an other day to helpe themselues, he did bind this Ieffrey prentise vnto the craft of nailyng, to make all kinde of nayles: whiche occupation he learned and serued out the time of vij. yeares. The which yeres being expired,

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he gaue him selfe at times to learne of his other Brethren whiche went to schole: and as he was very willing to the same, so GOD sent him knowledge, wherin he did perseuer and go forwardes, in such sort that he could write and read indifferently, and in longer continuaunce came by more knowledge, and so hauyng the Bible and diuers other bookes in his house, did come by pretie knowledge in the Scripture. MarginaliaIeffrey Hurst brother to George Marsh the Martyr.After this, hee tooke vnto him a wife beeyng the sister of M. George Marshe, of whose Martyrdome mention is made before, pag. 1484. and beyng much familiar with him, did mend his knowledge not a little, Now when Q. Mary was entred, the first yeare of her reigne he kept him self away from their doynges and came not at the Church: Whereupon he was laid in waite for, and called hereticke, and Lollard, and so for feare of further daunger, MarginaliaIeffrey Hurst leaueth wife, children, and house for persecution.he was compelled to leaue his wife and his child, and all, and fled into Yorkeshyre, and there beyng not knowen did leade his life, returnyng sometymes by night to his house to comfort his wife, and bryngyng with hym some Preacher or other, who vsed to preache vnto them so long as the tyme would serue, and so departed by night againe. MarginaliaPreachers vsing to Ieffrey Hurstes house and to preach.The names of the Preachers were: M. Reneses, M. Best, M. Brodbanke, M. Russell, & euery time they came thether they were about xx. or xxiiij. sometymes, but xvi. at least, who had there also sometimes a Communion. And thus in much feare did he with other lead his life, till the last yeare of the reigne of Queene Mary. Then it chaunced that the said Ieffrey Hurst, after the death of his father, came home, and kept him selfe close for vij. or viij. weekes.

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There dwelt not farre of at Morlesse, a certain Iustice of peace and of quorum, named M. Thomas Lelond, MarginaliaM. Thomas Lelond Iustice of peace at Morlese in Lancashire, a cruell persecutor. who hearyng of him, appointed a tyme to come to his fathers house where he then dwelt, to rifle the house for bookes, and to search for him also, and so did. Ieffrey and his company hauyng knowledge of his commyng, tooke the bookes which were in the house, as the Bible, the Communion booke, the new Testament of Tyndals translation, and diuers others, & threw them al vnderneath a tub or fat, MarginaliaIeffrey Hurst conueied vnder a Drifat.conueiyng also the said Ieffrey vnder the same, with a great deale of straw cast vnderneth him: for as it chaunced they had the more time, because that when the Iustice came almost to the doore, he staid & would not enter the house till he had sent for Hurstes mothers landlady M. Shakerlay, MarginaliaMistres Shakerlay Hurstes Landlady. & then with her consent to go forwards. In the meane time, Ieffrey by such as were with him, was willed to lay in his window þe Testamēt of Tindals translatiō, & a litle boke conteining the third part of the Bible, with the boke of Ecclesiasticus, to try what they would say vnto them.

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This done, Mistres Shakerlay came. Vnto whom eftesones the Iustice declareth the cause of his cōming and how he was sory to attēpt any such thing against any of her tenantes for her sake, but notwithstandyng he must needes execute his office. And againe you must (said he) note this, that a skabbed sheepe is able to infect a great number: and especially hauyng, as he hath, so many brethren, and sisters, he is able to marre them all, if it be not loked vnto in time. MarginaliaM. Lelond entreth to search Hurstes house.And thus cōcluding, M. Lelond entred into the house, & being come in, set him selfe in a chaire in the midle of the house, and sendyng Syr Rafe Parkinson MarginaliaRafe Parkinson a Popish persecutyng Priest. his Priest, and one of his men, and one of Mistres Shakerleys men about the house, to search and rifle the chestes for bookes (which so did) in the meane tyme hee talked with Hurstes mother, beyng of þe age almost of iij. score yeares: And chiding with her that she would suffer her son so to order and behaue him selfe like an hereticke, said: thou olde foole, I know my self that this new learning shal come again: but for how long? euen for thre monethes or iiij. monethes and no longer. MarginaliaThe Papistes follow false prophesies, of the Gospell to come againe after four Monethes & more.But I will lay thee old foole in Lancaster dungeon for this geare, and well worthy.

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Now as concernyng the Searchers, they found nothing but Latin bookes, as Granmer and suche like. These be not they that we loke for (said they): we must see further, and so looked into Hurstes chamber where they found the foresaid bookes. Then syr Rafe taking vp the testament, looked on it and smiled. His Master seyng that, said: now Syr Rafe, what haue we there? Forsooth, saith he, a Testament of Tyndals translation, plaine heresie, MarginaliaThe new Testamēt of Tindals translation made heresie. and none worse then it. Then is al their goodes, saith he, lost to the Queene and their bodies to prison, and was wonderfully hasty: notwithstādyng through Mistres Shakerley, for a space he was content to see farther.

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Then
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