Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Alice Benden and other martyrs10. Examinations of Matthew Plaise11. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs12. Ambrose13. Richard Lush14. Edmund Allen15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. Priest's Wife of Exeter49. The Final Five Martyrs50. John Hunt and Richard White51. John Fetty52. Nicholas Burton53. John Fronton54. Another Martyrdom in Spain55. Baker and Burgate56. Burges and Hoker57. The Scourged: Introduction58. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax59. Thomas Greene60. Bartlett Greene and Cotton61. Steven Cotton's Letter62. James Harris63. Robert Williams64. Bonner's Beating of Boys65. A Beggar of Salisbury66. Providences: Introduction67. The Miraculously Preserved68. William Living69. Edward Grew70. William Browne71. Elizabeth Young72. Elizabeth Lawson73. Christenmas and Wattes74. John Glover75. Dabney76. Alexander Wimshurst77. Bosom's wife78. Lady Knevet79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Edward Benet85. Jeffrey Hurst86. William Wood87. Simon Grinaeus88. The Duchess of Suffolk89. Thomas Horton 90. Thomas Sprat91. John Cornet92. Thomas Bryce93. Gertrude Crockhey94. William Mauldon95. Robert Horneby96. Mistress Sandes97. John Kempe98. Thomas Rose99. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers100. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth101. The Unprosperous Queen Mary102. Punishments of Persecutors103. Foreign Examples104. A Letter to Henry II of France105. The Death of Henry II and others106. Justice Nine-Holes107. John Whiteman108. Admonition to the Reader109. Hales' Oration110. Cautions to the Reader111. Snel112. Laremouth113. William Hunter's Letter
Critical Apparatus for this Page
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2002 [1975]

Q. M. Diuers saued by Gods prouidēce frō burning in Q. Maries time.

MarginaliaAnno. 1558.wayting for him vpon Gaddes hyll, fell in companie with a Promotor, whiche dogged them and followed them goyng to Grauesend, into the towne, and layed the house for them where they were, and all the wayes as they should goe to the water side: so that it had not bene possible for thē to haue auoyded the present daunger of those persecutors, had not the Lordes prouident care otherwise disposed for his seruaunts through the Hostler of the Inne, couertly to conuey thē by a secret passage: MarginaliaThomas and Iohn Bryce deliuered by Gods good meanes and protection.whereby they tooke Barge a mile out of the towne, and so in the end both the liues of them, and also of Springfield was preserued, through the Lordes gracious protection.

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¶ Gertrude Crokehay. 
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See 1583, pp. 2145-46.

MarginaliaThe trouble & deliueraunce of Gertrude Crokehay.GErtrude Crokehay dwelling at S. Katherines by the Tower of London, and beyng then in her husbandes house, it happened, in the yeare. 1556. that the Popes childish S. Nicolas wēt about the Parish. Which she vnderstanding, shut her doore against him, not sufferyng him to enter into her house.

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Then Doct. Mallet MarginaliaThis D. Mallet is now Deane of Lincolne. hearyng therof, and beyng then Maister of the sayd S. Katherins, the next day came to her with xx. at his taile, thinking belike to fray her, and asked why she would not the night before let in S. Nicolas and receaue his blessing. &c. To whom she aunswered thus. Syr, I know no S. Nicolas (sayd she) that came hether. Yes quod Mallet, here was one that represented S. Nicolas.

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In deede Syr (sayd she) here was one that was my neighbours child, but not S. Nicolas: for S. Nicolas is in heauē. I was afrayd of them that came with him to haue had my purse cut by them: for I haue heard of men robbed by S. Nicolas clerkes. &c. So Mallet perceiuing that nothing could be gotten at her hands, went his way as he came, & she for that time so escaped.

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MarginaliaAn other trouble of the sayd Gertrude in Dutchland.Thē in the yeare 1557. a litle before Whitsontide, it happened that the sayd Gertrude aunswered for a childe that was baptised of one Thomas Saunders, which childe was Christened secretly in a house after the order of the seruice booke in king Edwardes time, and that being shortly knowen to her enemies, she was sought for. Whiche vnderstandyng nothing thereof, went beyond the sea into Gelderland, to see certayne landes that should come to her children in the right of her first husband, who was a straunger borne, and being there about a quarter of a yeare, at the length commyng homeward by Andwarpe, she chaunced to meete wyth one Iohn Iohnson a dutch man, aliâs Iohn De villa of Andwarpe, shipper, who seing her there, went of malyce to the Margraue, and accused her to be an Anabaptist: whereby she was taken and caryed to prison. The cause why this naughty man did thus, was for that he claymed of Master Crokhay her husband a peece of money which was not his due, for a ship that Master Crokhay bought of him, and for that he could not get it, he wrought this displeasure. Well, she being in prison, lay there a fortnight. In the which tyme she saw some that were prisoners there, who priuely were drowned in Renysh wine fattes, and after secretly put in sackes and cast into the Riuer. MarginaliaCrueltie in Flaunders vsed secretly agaynst the Christians.Now she, good woman, thinking to be so serued, tooke thereby such feare that it brought the beginning of her sicknes, of the which at length she dyed.

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Thē at the last was she called before the Margraue and charged with Anabaptistry: which she there vtterly denyed, and detested the error, declaring before him in Dutch her fayth boldly, without any feare. So the Margraue hearing the same, in the ende beyng well pleased with her profession, at the sute of some her frendes, deliuered her out of prison, but toke away her booke, MarginaliaGertrude returneth into England.and so she came ouer into England agayne.

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¶ William Mauldon. 
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This is an abriged account of Maldon's description of the episode which survives in Foxe's papers: BL, Harley MS 590, fo. 77r-v.

MarginaliaA storie of W. Mauldō.J Lightly passe ouer here the tedious afflictions of William Mauldon, how in the daungerous time of the vi. Articles, before the burnyng of Anne Askew, MarginaliaW. Mauldon accused & scourged for true religion.he was scourged beyng young, of his father, for professing and confessing of true Religion: and afterward beyng examined in auricular confession by the Priest, his bookes were searched for, and so at length he was presented vp by the same Priest in a letter writtē to the Byshop. Which letter, had it not bene burned by an other priest to whose hands it came (as the Lord would haue it) it had vndoubtedly cost him his life.

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This one thing in the said William Mauldō is to

be noted, that he beyng young, in those dayes of King Henry, when the Masse most florished, the altars with the Sacrament thereof being in their most high veneration, that to mans reason it might seeme vnpossible that the glory and opinion of that Sacramēt and Sacramētals, so highly worshipped, and so deepely rooted in the hartes of so many, could by any meanes possible so so soone decay and vanish to naught: yet notwithstandyng hee beyng then so young, vnder the age of xvij. yeares, MarginaliaThe Prophesie of W. Mauldō in K. Henryes time, for the fal of Masse and Sacrament of the altar.by the spirite (no doubt) of prophesie, declared then vnto hys parentes, that they should see it euen shortly come to passe, that both the Sacrament of the altar and the altars them selues, with all such plantations which the heauenly father did not plante, should bee plucked vp by the rootes: and euen so within the space of very few yeares the euent therof followed accordyngly: the Lord therefore bee praysed for his most gratious reformation.

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¶ Robert Horneby. 
Commentary  *  Close

This account reprints a note in Foxe's handwriting (BL, Harley MS 419, fo. 137r). On Horneby and this account see Thomas S. Freeman, '"As True a Subiect being Prysoner": John Foxe's Notes on the Imprisonment of Princess Elizabeth', English Historical Review 117 (2002), pp. 106-07.

MarginaliaRob. Horneby through Gods working preserued.J Let passe likewyse the daungerous escape of Robert Horneby, seruaunt sometyme and groome of the chamber to Lady Elizabeth, she beyng thē in trouble in Queene Maryes dayes: who beyng willed to come to Masse, refused so to doe, and therfore cōming afterward from Woodstocke to Hampton court, was called before the Counsaile, and by them committed to the Marshalsea, and not vnlyke to haue susteyned further daunger, had not the Lordes goodnes better prouided for him, who at length by Doct. Martyn was deliuered.

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¶ Mistres Sandes. 
Commentary  *  Close

This account reprints a note in Foxe's handwriting (BL, Harley MS 419, fo. 137r). On Sandes and this account see Thomas S. Freeman, "'As True a Subiect being Prysoner": John Foxe's Notes on the Imprisonment of Princess Elizabeth', English Historical Review 117 (2002), pp. 107-08 and 110.

MarginaliaMistres Sandes, now Lady Bartlet, preserued from persecution.THe like also maie be testified and recorded of Mistres Sandes, now wife to Syr Morice Bartlet, 

Commentary  *  Close

I.e., Sir Maurice Berkely of Bruton, Somerset. Elizabeth Sandes married him in 1562.

then Gentlewoman wayter to the sayd Lady Elizabeth beyng in the Tower. Which Mistres Sandes denyed in like maner to come to Masse, and therefore beside the heauy displeasure of her father, was not only displaced from her roume, and put out of the house, but also was in great ieopardy of further tryall. But the Lord who disposeth for euery one, as he seeth best, wrought her way out of her enemies handes by flying ouer the seas, were she continued amongest other banished exiles in the Citie of Geneua and of Basill, till the death of Queene Marie.

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¶ The preseruyng of Iohn Kempe. 
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Rose, Kemp and Sandys

The next three accounts of 'miraculous' preservations of godly people from danger have three things in common. In the first place, they are each invaluable detailed records of the activities of protestants during Mary's reign. Secondly they each came into the Acts and Monuments at a late date; the accounts of Rose and Kemp were introduced in the 1576 edition and the account of Sandys in the 1583 edition. Finally, and most importantly, all three accounts were written by their protagonists and sent to Foxe for purposes of self-justification and self-exculpation. Rose was clearly anxious to explain away the recantations which saved his life and Sandys was concerned to demonstrate that he had been released from prison without ever recanting. Kemp's motives for his account were even more interesting. One of the leaders of the freewillers, merely mentioned by Foxe, was named John Kemp. (Foxe's casual references to the freewiller, both deleted in the 1570 edition, are 1563, pp. 1530 and 1605). The John Kemp who wrote a detailed account of his activities in Mary's reign, which only appeared in the 1576 edition (pp. 1975-77), wanted to demonstrate that he was not the freewiller of the same name. (See Thomas S.Freeman, 'Dissenters from a Dissenting Church: The Challenge of the Freewillers1550-1558' in The Beginnings of English Protestantism, ed. Peter Marshall andAlec Ryrie [Cambridge, 2002], p. 147). Kemp's account was deleted from the 1583 edition and, in many ways, it is a wonder that it was printed at all, since it mentioned the schisms among Marian protestants which Foxe was determined to cover up. One possible reason was that Kemp may have been a friend of Foxe's friend Alexander Wimshurst (see Freeman, 'Dissenters,' p. 147 n. 99).

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MarginaliaIohn Kempe troubled for not comming to church.ANno 1. Mariæ Iohn Kempe thē of Godstone in Surrey, nowe Minister in the Isle of Wight, was by Iames Scinner Iustice, and Syr Thomas Saunder Sherife, pursued and driuen from his house, for that he refused to come to church. Yet hee returned to his wife and famely in the ende of Iuly ensuyng, where, vppon a Sonday as hee conferred in Scripture with three of four of his neighbours, one Thomas Simson sodainly presented hymselfe before them, a good space harkenyng and beholdyng the company, but slipped out againe without any woord. Where behold the mightie woorkyng of Gods spirite, in preseruing the one, and conuerting the other. For the said Simson from that tyme forward seekyng acquaintaunce with Iohn Kempe, was conuerted to the truthe, confessyng that hee entred the house to haue betraied them present, but beeyng amased at the sight, and stoken with their woordes, departed quietly with a chaunged purpose.

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The sayd Kempe also about the beginnyng of October ensuyng, as he went vpon a Sonday mornyng toward Brynsted, met vpon a greene called new chapell Grene, with one Iohn Estlaud, aliâs, Launder, of whō he asked whether he went, Launder aunswered to the church of Lingfeild: why quod Kempe, are you then weary of the truth and Gospell of God? will you now run to Idolatry, and straunge religion, then all shall be in vaine whiche hitherto you have done, MarginaliaGod liketh not double daling and halting on both sides.suche haultyng and double dealyng God liketh not, and so departed, Launder proceedyng in his iorney to the church, came to the dore, but moued in hart and conscience could not go in, as he hym self confessed, returnyng home agayne, and about the end of the same moneth went with Thomas Simson to Brighchamston in Sussex, to shift for a season, where they with others were apprehended in Dyrick Caruers House, and suffered Martyrdome, Anno 1555. Iuly 22, pag. 1594.

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