Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Alice Benden and other martyrs10. Examinations of Matthew Plaise11. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs12. Ambrose13. Richard Lush14. Edmund Allen15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. Priest's Wife of Exeter49. The Final Five Martyrs50. John Hunt and Richard White51. John Fetty52. Nicholas Burton53. John Fronton54. Another Martyrdom in Spain55. Baker and Burgate56. Burges and Hoker57. The Scourged: Introduction58. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax59. Thomas Greene60. Bartlett Greene and Cotton61. Steven Cotton's Letter62. James Harris63. Robert Williams64. Bonner's Beating of Boys65. A Beggar of Salisbury66. Providences: Introduction67. The Miraculously Preserved68. William Living69. Edward Grew70. William Browne71. Elizabeth Young72. Elizabeth Lawson73. Christenmas and Wattes74. John Glover75. Dabney76. Alexander Wimshurst77. Bosom's wife78. Lady Knevet79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Edward Benet85. Jeffrey Hurst86. William Wood87. Simon Grinaeus88. The Duchess of Suffolk89. Thomas Horton 90. Thomas Sprat91. John Cornet92. Thomas Bryce93. Gertrude Crockhey94. William Mauldon95. Robert Horneby96. Mistress Sandes97. John Kempe98. Thomas Rose99. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers100. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth101. The Unprosperous Queen Mary102. Punishments of Persecutors103. Foreign Examples104. A Letter to Henry II of France105. The Death of Henry II and others106. Justice Nine-Holes107. John Whiteman108. Admonition to the Reader109. Hales' Oration110. Cautions to the Reader111. Snel112. Laremouth113. William Hunter's Letter
Critical Apparatus for this Page
None
Names and Places on this Page
Unavailable for this Edition
2007 [1980]

Q. Mary. The troubles and last appearance of Tho. Rose before the Byshop.

Marginalia1558.And for this they brought in S. Augustine, although of them not truely vnderstāded, yet would they admyt none other sense then their owne, but would take vpon them to confirme it with Martin Luther, Melancthon, Bucer, & Caluine, so that I perceyuyng their obstinacie in that behalfe, gaue them ouer for that tyme, and afterwards talked with Doctour Barret, whom I also founde of the same iudgement in that behalfe. For (said he) if ye should dissent from the Fathers of the Primatiue church in this behalfe, of which S. Augustine is one, ye shal be counted to dye out of the fauour of God. Wel, al this their obstinacie and blasphemous errors imprinted & deepely weighed in my mynd, I gaue them al ouer, and the more quietly to bring them to confesse that openly, which they vnto me had graunted priuately, I graunted them, accordyng to the Scriptures, and my former protestatiō, a presence, although not as they supposed.

[Back to Top]

After all this, came there vnto me the honorable Earle of Sussex, and that gentle knyght sir William Woodhouse, with great perswasions: vnto whō I sayd, after long talk, that I would doo all that I might, sauyng my conscience, which I would in no wise pollute, and no more I haue, as knoweth God, by whom al men must be iudged.

[Back to Top]
¶ His last appearance before the Bishop.

MarginaliaThe last appearance of Thomas Rose before the Byshop.NOw to come to my last appearance, after I was before the Bishop presented, he forthwith demaunded of me, whether I were resolued, as he had heard say. To whom I answeared, that euen as alwayes I had said before, that euen so I was now. Vnto whō by low bowyng my knee, I gaue my due reuerence, and the rather for that the honorable Earle of Sussex were there. Wherewith some whiche would be counted great Gospellers, were contrarye to all Christianitie, sore offended. Then I sayd, that what soeuer lawes were set forth for the establishment of Christes true religion, and that accordyng to the doctrine of Christes holy Apostles, & the faithful fathers of the primatiue church, I dyd not only obey them, but most earnestly embrace and beleue them. Yea, and yet to the further blyndyng of their eyes, I said, that if any thing could iustly be proued by gods holy worde, by me heretofore preached or taught vntruely, either for lacke of learnyng, slide of tongue, or of ignorance, yet by better knowledge when it shal iustly be tryed & examined by the same: I shall not refuse (the thyng perfectly approued) to reuoke þe same. Prouided alwayes, the word of God herein to be iudge.

[Back to Top]

Al this spake I (as God knoweth) to keepe them frō suspectyng that which I went about, and that they should haue none occasion to iudge me of obstinacie. Then sayd I moreouer, Al you must of force confesse, that the doctrine by me heretofore preached, had besides the authoritie of Gods eternal veritie, the authoritie of two most noble and mighty princes, with the aduice and counsel of al the Nobilitie and Cleregie of the same, and that with great deliberation from tyme to time, with open disputations in both the Vniuersities: enacted also by parlament with the consent of þe whole body and Commons of the same, and that without any resistance or gainsaying established, as a religion most pure & perfect, most earnestly and sincerely preached by the principal Bishops and Doctors, and that before the kyngs maiesties persō, & I as one being called to that office, dyd þe like, with al the rest, and in the zeale of God, & with a pure conscience dyd set forth þe same as the onely and absolute truth of God, and the iust and most true proceedynges of my soueraigne Lord and king, and I had then my head at that present euen where it now standeth, betwixt myne eares, altogether applying the same, to apprehende with all diligence, that whiche then was established and taught, as the onely and absolute truth, and a thyng vnto me most desirous and wel liking, without my desire to heare the cōtrary, tyl now through this my captiuitie I am compelled to heare the cōtrary part speake, who are euen here present, and which my Lord sent vnto me.

[Back to Top]

Of whom after long disputations priuately to and fro before this tyme had betwixt vs, at length I haue heard by them a contrary doctrine, which I neuer before had hearde, and therefore must confesse myne owne ignoraunce in the same. For (quoth I) after I had enforced these men here present (meanyng the Bishops two Chapleynes) to confesse Iesus Christes naturall body with his full complete members in the due order and proportion of a perfect mans body to be present at the right hand of God the father, and that without returne from thence vntyl the last iudgement, and also that after the words pronounced by the priest there remayneth no such grosse presence of fleshe, bloud, bones, heare, and nayles, as was wont to be preached, but that after I had demaunded of them what maner of bodye

[Back to Top]

they affirmed to be present, they saide: A body inuisible by the omnipotencie of Gods worde, which neyther can be felt nor seene, nor that hath any distinctiō of members, but such a body as occupyeth no place, but is there, they knowe not howe, necessitie compelled me to confesse myne ignoraunce in that behalfe: although in very deede they perceyued not my meanyng therein, neither was it in my thought they should so doo. For by this their confession, and my silence, afterward I perceuyed their horrible blasphemies.

[Back to Top]

And me thought, in this I had well discharged at that tyme my conscience, in causing them in open audience to cōfesse the same, and so I graunted a presence, but not as they supposed.

For onely I sayd, that Christ after the word pronounced, is present in the lawful vse and right distribution of his holy Supper, whiche thyng I neuer denyed, nor any godly man that euer I heard of. For (sayde I) Eusebius Emissenus a man of singular fame and learnyng, about three hundred yeares after Christes ascension, saith: That the conuersion of the visible creatures of bread and wyne into the body and bloud of Christ, is like vnto our conuersion in Baptisme, where nothyng is outwardly chaunged, but all the chaunge is inwardly by the mighty working of the holy Ghost, whiche fashioneth and frameth Christ in the hart and mynd of man, as by the example of Peter preachyng to the people. Actes. 2. MarginaliaActes. 2. By which he so pierced their consciences, that they openly with most earnest repentance confessed their sinnes, saying: Men and brethren, what shal we doo? Repent, and be baptised euery of you (sayd Peter) in the name of Iesus Christ: so that at this Sermon there were which turned vnto Christ, three thousand persons, in whō Christ was so fashioned and framed, as that he dyd dwel in euery one of them, and they in hym: and after the like maner (said I) is Christ present in the lawfull vse and right distribution of his holy Supper, and not otherwise. For although I sayd, accordyng to the truth, that Christ dwelt in euery one of these persons rehearsed, yet meant I nothyng lesse, then that he in them shoulde haue a grosse, carnall, or fleshly dwellyng.

[Back to Top]

And no more meant I (as knoweth God) hym carnally or naturally to be in the Sacrament, but accordyng to the Scriptures, and my former protestation, that is, MarginaliaHow Christ is present in the Sacrament.to the spiritual nourishmēt of al such as worthyly come vnto that holy Supper, receiuyng it accordyng to his holy institutiō.

[Back to Top]

And thus I ended, which the Papistes most maliciously and and sclaunderously named a recantation, whiche I neuer meant nor thought (as God knoweth.)

Now after I had thus concluded my speach, the Bishop takyng me by the hand, said: Father Rose, you may be a worthy instrument in Gods church, and we wyll see to you at our commyng home (for he was about to take his iourney in visitation of his Dioces) and they feared much at this very tyme, least Queene Mary should haue miscaryed in chyld trauaile, which was looked for, beyng then accoūted very great with chyld, so that they were not so fierce at they had bene, and doubted very much of some sturre, if I should haue suffered, and therfore were glad to be ryd of me, so that by any colorable meanes for their own discharge it might be: so that the night folowyng I was onely commytted to myne old lodging.

[Back to Top]

On the morowe when the Bishop was ready to ryde forth in visitation, he called me before hym, and perceiuyng that sir William Woodhouse dyd beare me great fauor, said, he was sory for me & my expenses, and therfore wished that I were somewhere, where I might spend no more money, tyl his returne. Why my lord (quoth sir Williā Woodhouse) he shall haue meate and drinke & lodgyng with me tyll your returne again, seeing you now breake vp house, & hereupon I went home with sir Williā that good knight, who most gently enterteyned me, & I had great libertie. MarginaliaPopish priestes loue to blase abroad lyes.Vppon this the papistical priestes of the Colledge of Christes Church in Norwich, for that they saw me at libertie in sir Williams absence (who also was then from home a fortnight) blased it abroad, that sir William was bounden for me in body and landes. At his commyng home therfore I asked sir Williā if he were so bounden for me: and he denyed it. Then sayd I: Syr,. but for the reuerēce I beare to you, I might haue bene an hundred myles from you ere this. But I trust now sir, seeing you be not bounden for me, I may goe visite my frends. Goe where you wil, said sir William, for (quoth he) I tolde the Bishop I woulde not be his Gaylor, but promised onely meate, drinke, and lodgyng for you. Shortly after, vppon the deuise of some frendes, I was closely conueyed to a frendes house, where almost a moneth I was secretly kept, tyl rumours were ouer. For at the Bishops returne, searchyng was for me, in so muche as all houses where it was knowen I had bene acquainted, were searched, and the shippes at Yarmouth.

[Back to Top]
At
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield