Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Alice Benden and other martyrs10. Examinations of Matthew Plaise11. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs12. Ambrose13. Richard Lush14. Edmund Allen15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. Priest's Wife of Exeter49. The Final Five Martyrs50. John Hunt and Richard White51. John Fetty52. Nicholas Burton53. John Fronton54. Another Martyrdom in Spain55. Baker and Burgate56. Burges and Hoker57. The Scourged: Introduction58. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax59. Thomas Greene60. Bartlett Greene and Cotton61. Steven Cotton's Letter62. James Harris63. Robert Williams64. Bonner's Beating of Boys65. A Beggar of Salisbury66. Providences: Introduction67. The Miraculously Preserved68. William Living69. Edward Grew70. William Browne71. Elizabeth Young72. Elizabeth Lawson73. Christenmas and Wattes74. John Glover75. Dabney76. Alexander Wimshurst77. Bosom's wife78. Lady Knevet79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Edward Benet85. Jeffrey Hurst86. William Wood87. Simon Grinaeus88. The Duchess of Suffolk89. Thomas Horton 90. Thomas Sprat91. John Cornet92. Thomas Bryce93. Gertrude Crockhey94. William Mauldon95. Robert Horneby96. Mistress Sandes97. John Kempe98. Thomas Rose99. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers100. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth101. The Unprosperous Queen Mary102. Punishments of Persecutors103. Foreign Examples104. A Letter to Henry II of France105. The Death of Henry II and others106. Justice Nine-Holes107. John Whiteman108. Admonition to the Reader109. Hales' Oration110. Cautions to the Reader111. Snel112. Laremouth113. William Hunter's Letter
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2009 [1982]

Q. Mary. Gods prouidence in preseruing Lady Elizabeth, in Q. Maries tyme.
MarginaliaAn. 1558.¶; The myraculous preseruation of Lady Elizabeth, nowe Queene of England, from extreme calamitie and daunger of lyfe, in the tyme of Queene Marye her Sister. 
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Miraculously Preserved and Preservation of Elizabeth

The irregular pagination of this account of Elizabeth in the 1563 edition suggests that it was a late addition to the volume. The 1563 narrative of Elizabeth began with a pæan to Elizabeth's virtues, much of which was drawn from John Aylmer's Harborow for faithfull and trewe subiectes (London: 1559). Foxe then proceeded with a detailed account of Elizabeth's arrest, imprisonment in the Tower and confinement at Woodstock. This narrative was based on material from a variety of individual informants (for these informants see Thomas S. Freeman, 'Providence and Presecription: The Account of Elizabeth in Foxe's "Book of Martyrs"' in The Myth of Elizabeth, ed. Susan Doran and Thomas S. Freeman [Basingstoke, 2003], pp. 33-35). In the 1570 edition, Foxe eliminated the praise of Elizabeth's virtues but added anecdotes about Elizabeth's imprisonment drawn from witnesses to these events (see Freeman, 'Providence and Prescription,' pp. 36-37 and Thomas S. Freeman, '"As True a Subiect being Prysoner": John Foxe's Notes on the Imprisonment of Princess Elizabeth, 1554-55', English Historical Review 117 (2002), pp. 104-16). One anecdote was added in 1576; apart from this there were no further changes made to the 1570 account in subsequent editions.

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MarginaliaThe blessed protection of almighty God in preseruing the Lady Elizabeth in her manifolde daungers and troubles.BVt when all hath bene said and tolde, what soeuer cā be recited touching the admyrable workyng of Gods present hand in defending and deliuering anye one person out of thraldome, neuer was there since the memory of our fathers any example to be shewed, wherin the Lordes mightye power hath more admirably and blessedly shewed it selfe, to the glory of his own name, to the comfort of al good hartes, and to the publike felicitie of this whole Realme, then in the myraculous custody & outscape of this our soueraigne Lady, now Queene, then Lady Elizabeth, in the strayt tyme of Queene Mary her sister.

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In which story, first we haue to consider in what extreme misery, sicknes, feare, and peryl her highnes was: into what care, what trouble of mynde, and what daunger of death shee was brought. MarginaliaThe troubles of Lady Elizabeth in Queene Maries tyme.First 

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Much of the next few passages is an unacknowledged quotation from John Aylmer, An harborow for faithfull and trewe subiectes (London: 1559), STC 1005,sig. N3v.

with great routes & bandes of armed men (and happy was he that might haue the carying of her) being fetched vp as the greatest traytour in the worlde, clapped in the Tower, and againe tossed from thence, from house to house, from prison to prison, frō post to pyller, at length also prisoner in her owne house, and garded with a sort of cutthrotes, which euer gaped for the spoyle, wherby they might be fingring of somwhat.

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Secondly, to consider againe we haue, all this notwithstanding, howe straungely, or rather myraculously from daunger shee was deliuered: what fauour and grace shee founde with the almighty, who when all helpe of man and hope of recouery was past, stretched out his mighty protection, and preserued her highnes, & placed her in this princely seate of rest and quietnes, wherein nowe shee sitteth, and long may shee sit, the Lorde of his glorious mercy graunt, we beseech hym.

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In which storye, if I should set foorth at large and at full all the particulars and circumstaunces therunto belongyng, and as iust occasion of the history requireth, besides the importunate length of the storye discoursed, peraduenture it might moue offence to some being yet aliue, & truth might get me hatred. Yet notwithstanding I intende (by the grace of Christ) therein to vse such breuitie and moderation, as both may be to the glory of God, the discharge of the story, the profite of the Reader, and hurt to none, suppressing the names of some, whom here although I could recite, yet I thought not to be more cruell in hurting their name, then the Queene hath bene mercifull in pardonyng their liues.

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MarginaliaThe history of the Lady Elizabeth.Therefore nowe to enter into the discourse of this tragicall matter, first here is to be noted, that Queene Mary when 

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This anecdote appears as a note in Foxe's handwriting in Foxe's papers: BL, Harley MS 419, fo. 137v. This anecdote first appeared in the 1570 edition.

shee was firste Queene, before shee was crowned, would goe no whyther, but would haue her by the hande, and send for her to dynner and supper: but after shee was crowned, shee neuer dyned nor supped with her, but kept her aloofe from her. &c. After this it happened, immediatly vpon the rysing of sir Thomas Wyat (as before was mentioned pag.1397. 1399.) that the Lady Elizabeth and the Lord Courtney were charged with false suspition of Syr Thomas Wyates rysing. Wherupō Queene Mary, whether for that surmise, or for what other cause I know not, being offended with the saide Elizabeth her sister, at that tyme lying in her house at Ashridge, the next day after the rising of Wyat, sent to her three of her Counsaylours, to wit, MarginaliaSyr Rich. Southwell Syr Edward Hastinges, and Syr Thomas Cornwalles sent to fetch vp Lady Elizabeth.Syr Richard Sowthwell, Syr Edward Hastinges, then Maister of the horse, and Syr Thomas Cornwalles, with their retinue and troupe of horsemen, to the number of two hundred and fifty. Whoat their sodaine and vnprouided commyng, found her at the same tyme sore sicke in her bed, and very feeble & weake of body. Whither when they came, ascendyng vp to her graces priuie chamber, they wylled one of her Ladyes, whom they met, to declare vnto her grace, that there were certaine come from the Court, which had a message from the Queene.

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Her grace hauyng knowledge therof, was right glad of their commyng: howbeit being then very sicke, & the night farre spent (which was at ten of the clocke) shee requested them by the messenger, that they woulde resort thyther in the mornyng. To this they answered, and by the said messenger sent worde againe, that they must needes see her, and

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would so doo, in what case so euer shee were. Whereat the Lady being agast, went to shewe her grace their wordes: but they hastily following her, came rushyng as soone as she into her graces chamber vnbydden.

MarginaliaThe vnmanerlines of the knightes.At whose so sodaine commyng into her bed chamber, her grace being not a litle amased, saide vnto them: Is the hast such, that it might not haue pleased you to come to morow in the mornyng?

They made aunswere, that they were right sory to see her in that case. And I (quoth shee) am not glad to see you here at this tyme of the night. Whereunto they answered, tha they came from the Queene to doo their message and duetie: which was to this effect, that the Queenes pleasure was, that shee should be at London the seuenth day of that present moneth. Whereunto shee sayde: Certes, no creature more glad then I to come to her Maiestie, beyng right sorye that I am not in case at this tyme to wayte on her, as you your selues doo see and can wel testifie.

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In deede we see it true (quoth they) that you doo say: for whiche we are very sorye. MarginaliaA straite Cōmission from the Queene, to bring the Lady Elyzabeth either quicke, or dead.Albeit we let you to vnderstande, that our Commission is such, and so strayneth vs, that we muste needes bryng you with vs, either quicke or dead. Wherat shee beyng amased, sorowfully said, that their Commission was very sore: but yet notwithstanding shee hoped it to be otherwise, and not so strayt. Yes verily, sayd they. Whereupon they called for two Phisitions, Doctour Owen and Doctour Wendye, demaunded of them, whether shee might be remoued from thence with life, or no. Whose aunswere and iudgement was, that there was no impediment to their iudgement, to the contrary, but that she might trauaile without daunger of lyfe.

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In conclusion, they wylled her to prepare agaynst the mornyng at nyne of the clocke to goe with them, declaring that they had brought with them the Queenes Lytter for her. MarginaliaThe gentlenes of Q. Mary to send her horslitter to bring her sister to trouble.After much talke, the messengers declaring how there was no prolongyng of tymes and dayes, so departed to their chamber, beyng enteteyned and cheared as apperteyned to their worships.

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MarginaliaLady Elizabeth taketh her iourney toward the Queene.On the next morowe at the tyme prescribed, they had her foorth as shee was, very faynt and feeble, and in suche case, that shee was redy to swound three or foure tymes betweene them. What should I speake here that can not well be expressed, what an heauy house there was to beholde the vnreuerend and doulefull dealyng of these men, but especially the carefull feare and captiuitie of their innocent Lady and Maistresse.

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Now to proceede in her iourney from Asheridge, al sicke in the Lytter, shee came to Redborne, where shee was garded al night: From thence to Saint Albones, to Syr Rafe Rowlets house, where shee taryed that night, both feeble in body, and comfortles in mynd. From that place they passed to Maister Doddes house at Mymmes, where also they remayned that night: and so frō thence shee came to Highgate: where shee beyng very sicke, taryed that night and the next day. Duryng which tyme of her abode there, came many Purseuantes and messengers from the Court: but for what purpose, I can not tel.

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From that place shee was conueyed to the Court: wher by the way came to meet her, many Gentlemen, to accōpany her highnes, whiche were very sory to see her in that case. But especially a great multitude of people there were standing by þe way, who then flocking about her Lytter, lamēted & bewayled greatly her estate. MarginaliaLady Elizabeth brought vp to London.Now, when shee came to the Court, her grace was there strayt wayes shut vp, and kept as close prisoner a fortnight, whiche was tyll Palme Sonday, seeing neither King nor Queene, nor Lorde, nor frende, all that tyme, but onely then the Lorde Chamberlayne, Syr Iohn Gage, and the Vicechamberlayne, which were attendant vnto the doores. About which tyme Syr William Sentlow was called before the Counsayle. To whose charge was layd that he knewe of Wyates rebellion. MarginaliaSyr Williā Sentlow cōmitted to the Tower.Which he stoutly denied, protesting that he was a true man both to God and his prince, defying all traytours and rebels: but being straytly examined, he was in conclusion committed to the Tower.

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The Fryday before Palme sonday, the bishop of Winchester, with. xix. other of the Counsaile (who shal be here nameles) came vnto her grace from the Queenes maiestie, MarginaliaLady Elizabeth charged with Syr Thomas Wyats conspiracie.and burdened her with Wyates conspiracie: which shee vtterly denyed, affirmyng that shee was altogether gyltlesse therein. They being not contented with this, MarginaliaLady Elizabeth charged with the busines of Syr Pet. Carew.charged her grace with busines made by sir Peter Carew, and the rest of the Gentlemen of the West countrey: which also shee vtterly denying, cleared her innocencie therin.

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In conclusion, after long debatyng of matters, they declared vnto her, that it was the Queenes wil and pleasure MarginaliaLady Elizabeth threatned to goe to the Tower.that shee should go vnto the Tower, while the matter wer further tryed and examined.

Wherat
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