Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Alice Benden and other martyrs10. Examinations of Matthew Plaise11. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs12. Ambrose13. Richard Lush14. Edmund Allen15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. Priest's Wife of Exeter49. The Final Five Martyrs50. John Hunt and Richard White51. John Fetty52. Nicholas Burton53. John Fronton54. Another Martyrdom in Spain55. Baker and Burgate56. Burges and Hoker57. The Scourged: Introduction58. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax59. Thomas Greene60. Bartlett Greene and Cotton61. Steven Cotton's Letter62. James Harris63. Robert Williams64. Bonner's Beating of Boys65. A Beggar of Salisbury66. Providences: Introduction67. The Miraculously Preserved68. William Living69. Edward Grew70. William Browne71. Elizabeth Young72. Elizabeth Lawson73. Christenmas and Wattes74. John Glover75. Dabney76. Alexander Wimshurst77. Bosom's wife78. Lady Knevet79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Edward Benet85. Jeffrey Hurst86. William Wood87. Simon Grinaeus88. The Duchess of Suffolk89. Thomas Horton 90. Thomas Sprat91. John Cornet92. Thomas Bryce93. Gertrude Crockhey94. William Mauldon95. Robert Horneby96. Mistress Sandes97. John Kempe98. Thomas Rose99. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers100. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth101. The Unprosperous Queen Mary102. Punishments of Persecutors103. Foreign Examples104. A Letter to Henry II of France105. The Death of Henry II and others106. Justice Nine-Holes107. John Whiteman108. Admonition to the Reader109. Hales' Oration110. Cautions to the Reader111. Snel112. Laremouth113. William Hunter's Letter
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2013 [1986]

Q. Mary. God prouidence in preseruing Lady Elizabeth in Q. Maries tyme.

Marginalia1558.Vnto whom the partie aunswered, saying: Syr (quoth he) I can not tell what he is. I pray you examine him, for I founde him in the place where my Ladyes Grace was walkyng, and what talke they haue had I can not tell. For I vnderstand him not, but he should seeme to me to be some straunger, and I thinke verely a Welchman, for he hath a white freese coate on his back. And for so much as I beyng the Queenes subiect, MarginaliaThe straitnes of Sir Henry Benifield merely noted.and perceauyng the straite charge committed to you of her keepyng, that no straunger should haue accesse to her without sufficient licence, I haue here founde a straūger (what he is I can not tell) in place where her Grace was walkyng: and therfore for the necessary discharge of my duety, I thought it good to bryng the sayd straunger to you, to examine, as you see cause: and so he set him downe. At which his wordes Sir Henry seemed much displeased, and sayd: Well, well, you will neuer leaue this geare I see: and so they departed.

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Now, to returne to the matter from whence we haue digressed, after her Grace had bene there a tyme, shemade sute to the Counsaile that she might be suffered to write to the Queene. MarginaliaLady Elizabeth with much ado, suffered to write to the Queene.Whiche at last was permitted: so that Syr Henry Benifield brought her penne, inke, and paper: and standyng by her while she wrote (whiche he straitly obserued) alwayes she being wery, he would cary away her Letters, and bryng them agayne when she called for them. In the finishyng thereof, he would haue bene messenger to the Queene of the same. Whose request her grace denyed, saying: one of her owne men should cary them, & that she would neither trust him, nor none of his therein.

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Then he aunsweryng agayne sayd: none of them durst be so bold, (he trowed) to cary her Letters, beyng in that case. Yes (quoth she) I am assured I haue none so dishonest, that would deny my request in that behalfe, but wilbe as willyng to serue me now as before. Well (sayd hee) my Cōmissiō is to the contrary, and I may not so suffer it. Her grace replying agayne, sayd: you charge me very often with your Commission. MarginaliaThe cruell dealing of Syr Henry Benifield to the Lady Elizabeth reproued.I pray GOD you may iustly aunswere the cruell dealyng you vse towardes me.

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Then he kneelyng downe, desired her grace to thinke and consider how hee was a seruaunt, and put in trust there by the Queene to serue her Maiestie, protestyng that if the case were hers, hee would as willyngly serue her grace, as now he did the Queenes highnesse. For the which his aunswere, her grace thanked him, desiryng GOD that she might neuer haue neede of such seruauntes as he was: declaryng further to him, that his doynges towardes her were not good nor aunswerable, but more then all the frendes he had would stand by.

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To whom Syr Henry replied and sayd, that there was no remedy but his doynges must be aunswered, and so they should, trustyng to make good accompt thereof. The cause which moued her grace so to say, was for that he would not permit her letters to be caried iiij. or v. dayes after the writing thereof. MarginaliaThe Letters of the Lady Elizabeth caried to the Queene.But in fine he was cōtēt to send for her Gētleman from the Towne of Woodstocke, demaundyng of him whether he durst enterprise the cariage of her Graces Letters to the Queene, or no: and he aunswered, yea Syr, that I dare, and will with all my hart. Whereupon Syr Henry halfe agaynst his stomacke, tooke them vnto him.

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Then about the eight day of Iune came downe MarginaliaD. Owen & D. Wendye, Q. Maries Phisitions, sent to the Lady Elizabeth.Doctour Owne and Doctour Wendye, sent by the Queene to her grace, for that she was sickely: who ministryng to her, and letting her bloud, taried there and attended on her grace v. or vj. dayes. Then she beyng well amended, they returned agayne to the Court, makyng their good reporte to the Queene and the Counsaile of her graces behauiour & humblenes towardes the Queenes highnes. Which her Maiestie hearing, tooke very thankefully: but the Byshops thereat repined, MarginaliaThe popishe Prelates repined agaynst the Lady Elizabeth.looked blacke in the mouth, and told the Queene, they marueiled that she submitted not her self to her Maiesties mercy, consideryng that she had offended her highnes.

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MarginaliaLady Elizab. requested to submitte her selfe to the Queene.About this tyme, her Grace was requested by a secret frende, to submit her selfe to the Queenes Maiesty, which would be very well taken, and to her great quyet and commoditie. Vnto whom she aunswered, that she would neuer submitte her selfe to them whom she neuer offended. For (quoth she) if I haue offended and am giltie, I then craue no mercy, but the law, which I am certaine (quoth she) I should haue had ere this, if it could be proued by me. For I know my selfe (I thanke GOD) to be out of the daunger thereof, wishyng that I were as cleare out of the perill of my enemyes, and then I am assured I should not so be locked and bolted vp within walles and doores as I am. God geue them a better mynde when it pleaseth him.

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MarginaliaCounsell of the Papistes to mary the Lady Elizabeth to a Spāyard.About this tyme was there a great consultyng among the Byshops and Gentlemen touchyng a Mariage for her grace, whiche some of the Spanyardes wished to be with some straunger, that she might go out of the Realme with

her portion: some saying one thyng, and some an other.

MarginaliaWicked coūsell geuen agaynst Lady Elizabeth.A Lord (who shalbe here namelesse) beyng there, at last sayd, þt the Kyng should neuer haue any quyet common wealth in England, vnlesse her head were striken from the shoulders. Whereunto the Spanyards aunswered, saying: God forbyd that their Kyng and Maister should haue that mynde to consent to such a mischief.

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MarginaliaSpanyardes more fauorable to Lady Elizabeth then some English men.This was the curteous aunswere of the Spanyardes to the English men, speakyng after that sort agaynst their owne countrey. Frō that day the Spanyardes neuer left of their good perswasions to the Kyng, that the like honour he should neuer obtaine, as he should in deliueryng the Lady Elizabethes grace out of prison: whereby at lēgth she was happely released from the same. Here is a playne & euident example of the good clemency & nature of the Kyng and his Counsellers towardes her grace (praysed be God therfore) who moued their hartes therein. Then hereupon she was sent for shortly after to come to Hampton Court.

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But before her remouyng away from Woodstocke, we will a litle stay to declare in what daungers her life was in duryng this tyme she there remayned: MarginaliaLady Elizabeth in daunger of fire.first thorough fire, which began to kindle betwene the bordes and seelyng vnder the Chamber where she lay, whether by a sparke of fire, gotten into a crany, or whether of purpose by some that ment her no good, the Lord doth know. Neuerthelesse a worshypfull Knight of Oxfordshyre, which was there ioyned the same tyme with Syr Henry Benifield in keepyng that Lady (who then tooke vp the bordes and quenched the fire) verely supposed it to be done of purpose.

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MarginaliaLady Elizabeth in daunger of killing.Furthermore it is thought, and also affirmed (if it bee true) of one Paule Peny a Keeper of Woodstocke, a notorious ruffin and a butcherly wretch, that he was appointed to kill the sayd Lady Elizabeth: who both saw the man, beyng often in her sight, and also knew therof.

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MarginaliaAn other conspiracie of murder agaynst Lady Elizabeth.An other tyme, one of the priuy Chamber, a great man about the Queene, and a chief darlyng of Steuen Gardiner, named Maister Iames Basset, came to Blandenbridge a myle frō Woodstocke, wt xx. or xxx. priuye coates, and sent for Syr Henry Benifield to come and speake with him. But, as GOD would, whiche disposed all thynges after the purpose of his owne will, so it happened, that a little before, the sayd Syr Henry Benifield was sent for by post to the Counsell, leauyng straite word behynde him with his brother, that no man, what soeuer he were, though commyng with a Bill of the Queenes hand, or any other warraunt, should haue accesse to her before his returne againe. By reason wherof so it fell out, that Maister Benifieldes brother commyng to him at the Bridge, would suffer him in no case to approche in, who otherwise (as is supposed) was appointed violently to murder the innocent Lady.

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MarginaliaLady Elizabeth preserued by the Lordes prouidence from execution in the Tower.In the lyfe of Steuen Gardiner we declared before, pag. 1679. howe that the Lady Elizabeth beyng in the Tower, a writte came downe subscribed with certaine handes of the Counsell for her execution. Which if it were certaine, as it is reported, Winchester (no doubt) was deuiser of that mischieuous drift: and doubtlesse the same Achitophell had brought his impious purpose that day to passe, had not the fatherly prouidence of almighty GOD (who is alwayes stronger then the Deuill) styrred vp Maister Bridges Lieutenaunt the same tyme of the Tower, to come in hast to the Queene, to geue certificate therof, and to know further her consent touching her sisters death. Wherupon it followed, that all that deuise was disappointed, and Winchesters deuilish platte forme, MarginaliaWinchesters platforme ouer thrown. MarginaliaWherof read before pag. 1678. col. 2.which he said he had cast thorough the Lordes great goodnes, came to no effect.

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Where moreouer is to be noted, that duryng the prisonment of this Lady and Princesse, one Maister Edmund Tremayne was on the Racke, and Maister Smithwike, and diuers other in the Tower were examined, and diuers offers made to them to accuse the giltlesse Lady, beyng in her captiuitie. Howbeit all that notwithstandyng, no matter could be proued by all examinations, as she the same tyme lying at Woodstocke had certaine intelligence by the meanes of one Iohn Gayer: who vnder a colorable pretence of a Letter to Mistres Cleue from her father, was let in, and so gaue them secretely to vnderstand of all this matter. Whereupon the Lady Elizabeth at her departyng out from Woodstocke wrote these Verses with her Diamond in a glasse window.

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MarginaliaVerses written by Lady Elizabeth in the glasse Window.Much suspected by me:
Nothyng proued can be.

Quod Elizabeth prisoner.

And thus much touchyng the troubles of Lady Elizabeth at Woodstocke. Whereunto this is more to be added, that duryng the same tyme, the Lord of Tame had labored to the Queene, and became suretie for her, to haue her from Woodstocke to his house, and had obteined graunt thereof.

Wher-
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