Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Alice Benden and other martyrs10. Examinations of Matthew Plaise11. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs12. Ambrose13. Richard Lush14. Edmund Allen15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. Priest's Wife of Exeter49. The Final Five Martyrs50. John Hunt and Richard White51. John Fetty52. Nicholas Burton53. John Fronton54. Another Martyrdom in Spain55. Baker and Burgate56. Burges and Hoker57. The Scourged: Introduction58. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax59. Thomas Greene60. Bartlett Greene and Cotton61. Steven Cotton's Letter62. James Harris63. Robert Williams64. Bonner's Beating of Boys65. A Beggar of Salisbury66. Providences: Introduction67. The Miraculously Preserved68. William Living69. Edward Grew70. William Browne71. Elizabeth Young72. Elizabeth Lawson73. Christenmas and Wattes74. John Glover75. Dabney76. Alexander Wimshurst77. Bosom's wife78. Lady Knevet79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Edward Benet85. Jeffrey Hurst86. William Wood87. Simon Grinaeus88. The Duchess of Suffolk89. Thomas Horton 90. Thomas Sprat91. John Cornet92. Thomas Bryce93. Gertrude Crockhey94. William Mauldon95. Robert Horneby96. Mistress Sandes97. John Kempe98. Thomas Rose99. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers100. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth101. The Unprosperous Queen Mary102. Punishments of Persecutors103. Foreign Examples104. A Letter to Henry II of France105. The Death of Henry II and others106. Justice Nine-Holes107. John Whiteman108. Admonition to the Reader109. Hales' Oration110. Cautions to the Reader111. Snel112. Laremouth113. William Hunter's Letter
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2027 [2000]

Q. Mary. Gods punishment vpon Persecutors and contemners of his Gospell.

Marginalia1558.poore people, which alone beare the burthen, and possesse in maner nothyng.

In this doyng, an infinite number of men, and euen of your Nobilitie, which liue of the Crucifixe, should employ them selues to your seruice and the common wealthes so muche the more diligently, as they see that ye recompence none but those that haue deserued: where as nowe there is a infinitie number of men in your kingdome, whiche occupie the chiefest and greatest Benefices, whiche neuer deserued any part of them. &c. And thus much touchyng the superfluous possessions of the Popes Lordly Clergie. Now proceeding further in this exhortation to the king, thus the letter importeth.

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MarginaliaThe malicious and lying slaunders of the papistes to bring the true Gospellers in hatred with Princes.But when the Papistes see that they haue not to alledge for them selues any reason, they assay to make odious to your maiestie the Lutherans (as they call vs) and say: if their sayinges take place, ye shalbe fayne to remaine a priuate person: and that there is neuer chaunge of Religion, but there is also chaunge of Princedome: A thyng as false, as when they accuse vs to be Sacramentaries, and that we denye the authoritie of Magistrates, vnder the shadowe of certayne furious Anabaptistes, which Satan hath raysed in our tyme to darken the light of the Gospell: For the histories of the Emperours which haue begon to receyue the Christian Religion, and that which is come to passe in our tyme, shew the contrary.

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MarginaliaConstantine confirmed in his kingdome the more, by receauing the Gospel.Was there euer Prince more feared and obeyed, then Constantine in receiuyng the Christian Religion? was he therfore put from the Empire? No, he was therby the more confirmed and established in the same, and also his posterity whiche ruled them selues by his prouidence. But suche as haue fallen away and folowed mens traditions, God hath destroyed, and their race is no more knowen in earth: So much doth God detest them that forsake hym.

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MarginaliaExamples of England and Germany, how Princes loose no honor by the gospell.And in our tyme the late kynges of England and Germanie, were they constrayned in reprouyng superstitions, which the wickednes of the time had brought in, to forsake their kyngdomes and princedomes? MarginaliaThe Popes religion more noysome to the state of Princes, then the doctrine of the Lutherans.Al men see the contrary: and what honour, fidelitie, and obedience the people in our tyme that haue receyued the reformation of the gospel, do vnder their princes and superiours. Yea, I may say, that the princes knewe not before what it was to be obeyed, at that tyme when the rude and ignoraunt people receyued so redily the dispensations of the Pope, to driue out their own kynges and natural Lordes.

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MarginaliaWholesome remedy shewed against the Popes pride.The true and onely remedie, Syr is, that ye cause to be holden a holy and free Coūcell, where ye should be chiefe, and not the Pope and his, who ought but onely to defend their causes by the holy Scriptures: that in the meane while ye may seeke out men not corrupted, suspected, nor parciall, whom ye may charge to geue report faythfully vnto you of the true sense of the holy Scriptures. And this done, after the example of the good kynges Iosaphath, Ezechias, and Iosias, ye shall take out of the Church all Idolatrie, superstition, and abuse, which is found directly contrary to the holy Scriptures of the old and new Testament, and by that meanes ye shall guide your people in the true and pure seruice of God, not regarding in the meane tyme the cauilling pretenses of the Papistes, MarginaliaA blynde shift of the Papistes to stop Princes from calling generall Councels.which say, that such questions haue bene already answeared at general Councels: for it is knowen well enough, that no Councel hath ben lawfull since the Popes haue vsurped the principalitie and tyrannie vpon mens soules, but they haue made them serue to their couetousnes, ambition, and crueltie: and the contrarietie which is among those Councels, MarginaliaThe contrarietyes in the popes Councels, enough for their disproofe.maketh enough for their disproufe, beside a hundred thousand other absurdities against the word of God, which be in them. The true profe for suche matters is in the true and holy Scriptures, to the which no tymes nor age hath any prescription to be alledged agaynst them: for by them we receyue the Councels founded vpon the word of God, & also by the same we reiect that doctrine which is repugnaunt.

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And if ye do thus Syr, God wyl blesse your enterprise, he wyll increase and confirme your raigne and Empire, and your posteritie. If otherwise, destruction is at your gate, and vnhappy are the people which shall dwell vnder your obedience. MarginaliaProphesie agaynst the French King.There is no doubt but God wyll harden your hart as he dyd Pharaoes, and take of the crowne from your head, as he dyd to Ieroboam, Nadab, Baza, Achab, and to many other kynges, which haue folowed mens traditions, agaynst the commaundement of God: and geue it to your enemies to triumph ouer you and your chyldren.

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And if the Emperour Antonine the meeke, although he were a Pagan and Idolater, seeyng hym selfe bewrapt with so many warres, ceased the persecutions which were in his tyme agaynst the Christians, and determined in the ende to heare their causes and reasons, howe much more

ought you that beare the name of most Christian kyng, to be carefull and diligent to cease the persecutions agaynste the poore Christians, seeyng they haue not troubled, nor doo trouble in any wise the state of your kingdome, & your affayres: comsideryng also that the Iewes be suffered thorough al Christendome, although they be mortall enemyes of our Lorde Iesus Christe, whiche we holde by common accord and consent for our God, Redeemer, and Saueour: and that vntyll you haue heard lawfully debated, and vnderstande our reasons taken of the holy Scriptures, and that your maiestie haue iudged, if we be worthy of such punishmentes: For if we be not ouercome by the worde of God, the fires, the sword, nor the cruellest torments shal make vs afrayde. These be the exercises that God hath promised to his, of the which he foretold should come in the last tymes, that they should not be troubled when suche persecutions shal come vpon them.

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Translated out of the Frenche booke, entituled, Commentaryes of the state of the Churche and publike weale. &c. pag. 7.

¶ The story and ende of the French kyng.

MarginaliaThe story and end of Henry 2. the French King, that would not be warned.WHo soeuer was the authour or authours of this letter aboue prefixed, herein thou seest (good Reader) good counsel geuen to the kyng, if he had the grace to receyue it, and had folowed the same, no doubt but Gods blessing workyng with hym, he had not only set that Realme in a blessed stay, from much disturbance, but also had continued hym selfe in al florishing felicitie of princely honour and dignitie. For so doth the Lord commonly blesse and aduaunce such kinges and Princes, as seeke his honour, & submyt their willes to his obediēce. But cōmonly þe fault of kings and potentates of this world is, that beyng set about with Parasites, MarginaliaWhat commeth to Kinges that refuse good counsell.eyther they seldome beare the truth told them, or if they doo, yet wyll they not lightly be put from their owne wylles, disdayning to be admonished by their inferiours, be their counsel neuer so wholesome and godly. Whiche thing many tymes turneth them to great plagues and calamitie, as by plentiful examples of kyngs destroyed, wounded, imprisoned, deposed, drowned, poysoned, &c. may wel to them that reade histories appeare, but especially in this present example of Henry Frenche kyng, the seconde of that name, is in this our age notoriously to be considered. Who beyng well warned before (as may seeme) woulde not yet surcease his cruell persecution agaynst the Lordes people, but rather was the more hardened in harte, and inflamed againste them, in so much that he sayd to Anne du Bourg, one of the high Court of Parlament in Paris, threatnyng hym, that he woulde see hym burne with his owne eyes.

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MarginaliaHenry. 2. French king, wholy set to persecute the church of Christ.Further, howe his purpose was to extende his power and force likewise agaynst other places moe, in persecuting the Gospell of Christ, and professours thereof, to the vttermost of his abilitie, I leaue it to the report of thē, which in this matter know nore then I here wyll vtter.

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MarginaliaGods mighty power agaynst his enemies.But notwithstandyng al these crackes and threatnings of the kyng (to see what the Lord can doo in makyng hygh kynges to stoupe) euen the same day when the kyng was in his most rage agaynst these good men, almighty God takyng the cause in hande to fight for his Church, so turned the matter, that he made the great enemie of his, both with his mouth and with his hande, to worke his owne destruction: with his mouth in commaundyng, with his hand in geuyng hym the Launce into his hand, which the same day gaue hym his deathes wounde, as by the sequele hereof in readyng ye may vnderstand.

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¶ The stroke of Gods hande vpon Henry. 2. French Kyng.

KYng Henry being in the Parlament house, which was kept at the Fryer Augustines at Paris, because the Pallace was in preparyng agaynste the marriage of his daughter and his sister, and hauyng heard the opinion in religion of Anne du Bourg Counsaylour in the Lawe, a man eloquent and learned, he caused the sayde Anne du Bourg and Loys du Four Counsaylours, to be taken prisoners by the Constable of Fraunce, who apprehended them, and deliuered them into the handes of the Countie of Mongommery, the which caryed them to prison. Agaynst whom the kyng being wrathfull and angrye, among other talke, sayd to the sayd Anne du Bourg: These eyes of myne shall see thee burnt: And so on the. 19. of Iune, Commission was geuen to the Iudges to make his Proces.

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Duryng this meane while, great feastes and banquets were preparing in the Court, for ioy and gladnes of the mariage that should be of the kings daughter and sister, against the last day of Iune saue one. So when the day and tyme

aboue
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