Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Alice Benden and other martyrs10. Examinations of Matthew Plaise11. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs12. Ambrose13. Richard Lush14. Edmund Allen15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. Priest's Wife of Exeter49. The Final Five Martyrs50. John Hunt and Richard White51. John Fetty52. Nicholas Burton53. John Fronton54. Another Martyrdom in Spain55. Baker and Burgate56. Burges and Hoker57. The Scourged: Introduction58. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax59. Thomas Greene60. Bartlett Greene and Cotton61. Steven Cotton's Letter62. James Harris63. Robert Williams64. Bonner's Beating of Boys65. A Beggar of Salisbury66. Providences: Introduction67. The Miraculously Preserved68. William Living69. Edward Grew70. William Browne71. Elizabeth Young72. Elizabeth Lawson73. Christenmas and Wattes74. John Glover75. Dabney76. Alexander Wimshurst77. Bosom's wife78. Lady Knevet79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Edward Benet85. Jeffrey Hurst86. William Wood87. Simon Grinaeus88. The Duchess of Suffolk89. Thomas Horton 90. Thomas Sprat91. John Cornet92. Thomas Bryce93. Gertrude Crockhey94. William Mauldon95. Robert Horneby96. Mistress Sandes97. John Kempe98. Thomas Rose99. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers100. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth101. The Unprosperous Queen Mary102. Punishments of Persecutors103. Foreign Examples104. A Letter to Henry II of France105. The Death of Henry II and others106. Justice Nine-Holes107. John Whiteman108. Admonition to the Reader109. Hales' Oration110. Cautions to the Reader111. Snel112. Laremouth113. William Hunter's Letter
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2030 [2003]

Q. Mary. The terrible end of Persecutors. An admonition to the same.

so Catholike, & seruice so acceptable to God, let them ioyne this withal, & tel vs, how commeth then their proceedings to be so accursed of God, & their end so miserably plagued, as by these examples aboue specified, is here notoriously to be seene?

Agayne, if the doctrine of them be such heresie, whom they haue hytherto persecuted for heretiks vnto death, how then is almighty God become a maynteyner of heretikes, who hath reuenged their bloud so greeuously vpon their enemies and persecuters?

MarginaliaHenry. 2. the French King, and king Fraunces his sonne, stricken, the one in the eyes, the other with an imposteme in the eare.The puttyng out of the French Kynges eyes, which promised before with his eyes to see one of Gods true seruants burned, who seeth not with his eyes to be þe stroke of Gods hand vpon hym? Then his sonne Fraunces after hym, not regardyng his fathers stripe, would needes yet proceede in burnyng the same man: & dyd not the same God which put out his fathers eyes, geue him such a blow on the eare, that it cost hym his lyfe? MarginaliaSteuen Gardiner.if the platforme of Ste. Gardyner had ben a thyng so necessary for the church, & so gratefull vnto God, why then dyd it not prosper with hym, nor he with it: but both he & his platforme lay in the dust, & none leaft behynd hym to build vpon it? After the tyme of Ste. Gardiner, & at the Councel of Trent, what conspiracies and policies were deuised? what practises & traynes were layd through the secret confederacie of princes and prelates, for the vtter subuersion of the Gospell & all Gospellers, which if God had seene to haue bene for his glory, why then came they to none effect? yea, howe or by whom were they disclosed and foreprised, but by the Lord hym selfe, which would not haue them come forward?

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MarginaliaQ. Mary.The vehement zeale of Queene Mary, which was like to haue set vp the Pope here againe in England for euer, if it had so much pleased the Lord God as it pleased her self: or if it had ben so godly as it was bloudy, no doubt but Gods blessing would haue gone withall. But when was the realme of England more barren of al Gods blessings? what prince euer raigned here more shorter tyme, or lesse to his owne hartes ease then dyd Queene Mary?

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MarginaliaConstable of France.The Constable of Fraunce when he conuented with God, that if he had victory at S. Quintyns, he would set vpō Geneua, thought (no doubt) that he had made a great good bargayne with God: Much like to Iulian the Emperor, who going against the Persians, made his vow that if he sped wel, he would offer the bloud of Christiās. But what dyd God? came not both their vowes to like effect?

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The examples of such as reuolted from the Gospell to Papistry, be not many: but as fewe as they were, scarse can any be found which began to turne to the Pope, but the Lord began to turne from them, and to leaue them to their ghostly enemie: MarginaliaFranciscus de Spiera. MarginaliaKing of Nauarre. Henry Smyth. D. Shaxton. MarginaliaThe end of Gardiner. Iohn de Roma. Twyford. Balyfe of Crowland. Suffragan of Douer. D. Dunning. D. Geffray. Berry. Poncher Archb. Crescentius. Card. Rockwod. Latomus. Guarlacus. Eccius. Thornton. Pauyer. Longe. Bomelius, all professors of Popery.As we haue heard of Franciscus Spiera, a Lawyer in Italie, of the Kyng of Nauarre in Fraunce, of Henry Smyth and Doctor Shaxton in England, with other in other Countreys moe, of whom some dyed in great sorow of conscience, some in miserable doubt of their saluation, some striken by Gods hand, some driuen to hang or drowne them selues.

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The stinkyng death of Steuen Gardyner, of Iohn de Roma, of Twyford, of the Bayliffe of Crowland: The suddayne death of the Suffragane of Douer, of Doctour Dunnyng, of Doctour Geffray, of Berry the Promoter: The miserable and wretched ende of Poncher Archbishop of Towers, of Cardinall Crescētius, Castellanus: The desperate decease of Rockwoode, of Latomus, of Guarlacus: The earthly endyng of Henry Beauforde Cardinall of Winchester, of Eckius, of Thornton called Dicke of Douer: The wylfull and selfe murder, of Pauyer, of Richard Long, of Bomelius, besides infinite other: The dreadful takyng away and murren of so many persecutyng Bishops, so many bloudy Promoters, and malicious aduersaryes, in such a short tyme together with Queene Mary, and that without any mans hande, but onely by the secret working of Gods iust iudgement.

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To adde to these also the stinkyng death of Edmund Boner, commonly named the bloudy Bishop of London: who not many yeares ago, in the tyme & raigne of Queene Elizabeth, after he had long feasted and banketted in Durance at the Marshalsee, as he wretchedly dyed in his blind Popery, so as stinkyngly, and as blyndly at mydnyght was he brought out and buryed in the outside of al the Citie, amonges theeues and murderers, a place right conuenient for such a murderer: with confusion and derision both of men and chyldren, who tramplyng vpon his graue, wel declared how he was hated both of God and man. What els be al these (I say) but playne visible arguments, testimonies, and demonstrations euen from heauen againste the Pope, his murderyng Religion, and his bloudy doctrine? For who can deny their doinges not to be good, whose end is so euil? If Christ byd vs to know men by their fruits,

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and especially seeing by the end al thynges are to be tryed, how can the profession of that doctrine please God, which endeth so vngodly? Esaias chap. 50. prophesying of the ende of Gods enemies, which would needes walke in the light of their owne settyng vp, and not in the light of the Lords kindlyng, threatneth to them this final malediction: MarginaliaEsay. 50.In doloribus 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Foxe text narrative, quoting Isaiah 50. 11.
Foxe text Latin

In Doloribus dormietis.

Foxe text translation

In sorowe shall you sleepe.

Actual text of Isaiah. 50. 11. (Vulgate)

[de manu mea factum est hoc vobis] in doloribus dormietis.

(saith he) dormietis. i. 
Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Foxe text narrative, quoting Isaiah 50. 11.
Foxe text Latin

In Doloribus dormietis.

Foxe text translation

In sorowe shall you sleepe.

Actual text of Isaiah. 50. 11. (Vulgate)

[de manu mea factum est hoc vobis] in doloribus dormietis.

In sorowe shall you sleepe.
Let vs nowe take a suruey of all these persecuters, which of late haue so troubled the earth (and almost haue burned vp the world with fagots and fire, for maintenaunce of the Popes Religion) and see what the end hath ben of them that are nowe gone, and whither their Religiō hath brought them, but eyther to destruction, or desperatiō, or confusion and shame of life. So many great Doctours and Bishoppes haue cryed out of late so mightyly agaynst priests mariage, and haue they not, by Gods iust iudgment workyng their confusion, ben detected them selues and taken the most part of them in sinfull adultery, and shamefull fornication? MarginaliaPage. 205Cardinall Ioannes Cremensis the Popes Legate here in England, after he had set a law that priests should haue no wyues, was he not the next day after, beyng taken with his whoores, driuen out of London with confusion and shame enough, so that afterwarde he durst not shewe his face here any more? Besides the two Bishops in the late Councell of Trent, most shamefully taken in adulterie, mentioned before. Also besides innumerable other like forreyne storyes, which I let passe, to come now to our owne domesticall examples. MarginaliaA secret note of Papistes which haue bene great cryers out of Priestes mariage, and themselues after taken in open adultery.I could well name halfe a score at least of famous Doctours, and some Byshops, with their great Maisters of Popery, who in standyng earnestly against the mariage of Priestes, haue afterward bene taken in such dishonest factes them selues, that not onely they haue caryed the publike shame of adulterous lecherers, but some of them the markes also of burnyng fornication with them in their bodyes to their graues. Whose names although I suffer here to be suppressed, yet the examples of them may suffice to admonish all men that be wise, and which wyl auoyd the wrath of Gods terrible vengeance, to beware of Popery.

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MarginaliaComparison betweene the end of Popish persecutors and the Gospellers.And thus hauyng hitherto recited so many shamefull lyues and desperate endes of so many popishe persecutours striken by Gods hand: now let vs consider agayne on the contrary side the blessed endes geuen of almighty God vnto them, which haue stand so manfully in the defense of Christes Gospel, and the reformation of his Religion, and let the papistes them selues here be Iudges. First what a peaceable and heauenly end made the worthy seruant and singular Organe of God M. Luther?

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To speake likewise of the famous Iohn Duke of Saxonie and Prince Electour, of the good Palsgraue, of Philip Melancthon, of Pomeranus, Vrbanus Rhegius, Berengarius, of Vlricus Zuinglius, Oecolampadius, Pellicanus, Capito, Munsterus, Ioannes Caluinus, Petrus Martyr, Martin Bucer, Paulus Phagius, Ioan. Musculus, Bibliander, Gesnerus, Hofman, Augustinus Marloratus, Lewes of Bourbon Prince of Condy, and his godly wyfe before hym, with many moe, whiche were knowen to be learned men, and chiefe standerdes of þe Gospel side agaynst the Pope, MarginaliaThe godly end of the Gospellers to be noted.& yet no man able to bring forth any one example eyther of these, or of anye other true Gospeller, that eyther kylled hym selfe, or shewed forth any signification or appearaunce of despayre, but full of hope and constant in fayth, and replenished with the fruite of righteousnes in Christ Iesu, so yeelded they their lyues in quiet peace vnto the Lord.

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From these Forrerners, let vs come nowe to the Martyrs of Englande, and marke likewise the ende both of them, and semblably of all other of the same profession. MarginaliaThe blessed end of K. Edward vj.And firste to begynne with the blessed and heauenly departure of Kyng Edwarde the sixte, that firste put downe the Masse in Englande, MarginaliaThe pacient end of the Duke of Somerset the kynges vncle.and also of the lyke godly ende of his good Vncle the Duke of Somerset, whiche dyed before hym, with an infinite number of other priuate persons besides of the like Religion, in whose finall departyng, no suche blemishe is to be noted lyke to the desperate examples of them aboue recited: Let vs nowe enter the consideration of the blessed Martyrs, who although they suffered in their bodyes, yet reioyced they in theyr spirites, and albeit they were persecuted of men, yet were they comforted of þe Lord with such inward ioy and peace of conscience, that some writyng to their frendes, professed they were neuer so meerye before in all their lyues, some leapt for ioye, some for triumphe woulde put on their Scarfe, some their weddyng garment goyng to the fire, other kissed þe stake, some embraced þe fagots, some clapt their handes, some song Psalmes, MarginaliaThe quyet and ioyfull end of the Martyrs.vniuersally they all forgaue, & praied for their enimies, no murmuring, no repining was euer heard amongest thē, so that most truly might be

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