Thematic Divisions in Book 4
1. Lanfranc2. Gregory VII3. William the Conqueror4. William Rufus5. Henry I6. Stephen and Henry II7. Frederick Barbarossa8. Thomas Becket9. Becket's letters10. Becket's martyrdom and miracles11. Events of 1172-7812. Waldensians13. Other incidents of Henry II's reign14. First year of Richard I's reign15. Strife at Canterbury16. Richard I and Third Crusade17. William Longchamp18. King John19. Henry III's early reign20. Innocent III and mendicant orders21. Papal oppression of the English Church22. Albigensian Crusade23. Hubert de Burgh24. Gregory IX25. Schism between Greek and Latin Church26. Papal exactions from England27. Louis IX on Crusade28. Frederick II29. Opponents of Papacy30. Robert Grosseteste31. Aphorisms of Robert Grosseteste32. Persecution of Jews33. Papal oppression and Alexander IV34. Conflicts in universities and mendicant orders35. Henry III and the barons36. Battle of Lewes37. Battle of Evesham38. End of baronial war39. Ecclesiastical matters and Edward prince of Wales goes on crusade40. Foreign events in Henry III's reign41. First seven years of Edward I's reign42. War with Scotland43. Philip IV and Boniface VIII44. Events of 1305-745. Cassiodorous's letter46. Pierre de Cugniere47. Death of Edward I48. Piers Gaveston49. The Despensers and the death of Edward II50. John XXIII and Clement VI51. Rebellion in Bury St. Edmunds52. Edward III and Scotland53. Edward III and Philip VI54. Edward III and Archbishop Stratford55. Events of 1341-556. Outbreak of the Hundred Years War57. Anti-papal writers58. Quarrel among mendicants and universities59. Table of the Archbishops of Canterbury
Critical Apparatus for this Page
Commentary on the Text
Names and Places on this Page
Unavailable for this Edition
417 [416]

K. Edw.3. The French K. taken prisoner. Marsilius Patauinus.

next yeare after. an. 1349. it swaged.

Marginalia1350.
Calice almost lost by treason.
After this, in the next yeare insuyng, an. 1350. the towne of Calys was by treason of the keeper of the Castle, almost betrayed and wonne from the English men. MarginaliaThe death of the Frēench kyngWithin the compasse of which yeare, dyed Phillip the French kyng. After whom kyng Iohn his sonne succeded in the crowne. Marginalia1351.Who the next yeare after vnder false pretence of frendshyp, caused the Constable of Fraūce Earle of Ewe to be beheaded: who beyng taken prisoner before in warre by Englishmen, and long deteined in prison in England, was licensed by kyng Edward to visite his country of Fraunce. MarginaliaThe towne of Gwynes takenIn the same yeare the town of Gwines was taken by English mē, while the keepers of the hold were negligent and a sleepe.

[Back to Top]

Marginalia1352.
Victory of sir Roger Bentole
The yeare next folowyng, the Marshall of Fraunce with a great army was put to flight, by Syr Roger Bentele knight and Capitaine in Britanie, hauyng but onely 600. souldiours with him. In this battaile were taken ix. knightes, Esquiers and Gentlemen. 140. The French men and Britanes, by this victory were excedyngly discouraged, and their pride cut downe.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaFirst Duke of Lācast.In the yeare after, was Henry first made Duke of Lācaster, whiche before was Earle of Derby and Lancaster. Also diuers good ordinaunces were appointed in the Parliament at Westminster. Whiche after by auarice, and parciall fauour of the head men, were agayne vndone.

Marginalia1354.Concorde and agreement about the yeare. 1354. began to come well forward, & instrumentes were drawen vpon the same, betwene the ii. kynges. MarginaliaPope Innocent 6.But that the matter being brought vp to Pope Innocent 6. partly by the quarelyng of the French men, partly by the winking of the pope, whiche euer held with the French side, the conditions were repealed, which were these: That to the kyng of England, all the Dukedome of Aquitanie with other landes there, should be to him restored, without homage to the French kyng. And that kyng Edward agayne should surrender to him all his right and title, which he had in Fraunce: wherupon rose the occasion of great warre and tumulte: whiche folowed after betwene the two Realmes.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaChro. Adami Murimouth canonici D. Pauli de gestis Edward. 1.
1355.
It folowed after this, the yeare of our Lord. 1355. that kyng Edward hearyng of the death of Philip the French kyng, and that king Iohn his sonne, had graunted the Dukedome of Aquitanie to Charles his eldest sonne and Dolphin of Vienna: sent ouer Prince Edward with the Earle of Warwike, of Salisbury, of Oxford, and with them a sufficient number of able souldiours, into Aquitania. Where he beyng willingly receaued of diuers, þe rest he subdued: partly by force of sword, partly receaued, submitting themselues to his protection.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe third viage of K. Edward into Fraunce.Not long after this in þe same yeare, word being brought to kyng Edward that Iohn the Frēch kyng was ready to meete him at S. Oiners there to geue him battaile, gathered his power & set ouer to Calys with his ii. sonnes Leonelle Earle of Wilton: and Iohn of Gaunt, Earle of Richmond: and with Henry Duke of Lancaster. &c. MarginaliaThe French king refuseth to ioine in battaile with kyng Edward.Who beyng come to S. Omers, the French kyng with a mighty army of his franclyngs hearing of his comming, the nearer he approched to them the further retired they backe: wastyng and destroyng behind them, to the entent that the English army in pursuyng them should finde no vitals. By reason wherof, kyng Edward folowing him by the space of ix. or x. dayes vnto Haden (whē neither he could finde his enemy to fight, nor victuals or forage for his army) he returned vnto Calys: Where warre agayne beyng offered in the name of the kyng vpon vnstable conditions, and yet the same not performed, kyng Edward seyng the shrinking of his enemy, from Calys crossed the Seas into Englād: where he recouered agayne the towne of Barwicke, which the Scottes before by subtile trayne had gotten. MarginaliaFifty shillinges for euery sack of wool caryed out of England.At which tyme was graūted vnto the king in Parlament 50. s. for euery sacke or packe of woll that should bee caried ouer, for the space of vi. yeares together. By the which graunt, the kyng might despend euery day by estmation aboue a C. markes sterling. MarginaliaThe custome of wool for 6 yeares 15000. poundes sterling to king Edward.And for as much as euery yeare C. M. sackes of woll were thought to be exported out of the Realme: the summe therof for vi. yeares space was estemed to mount to xv. hundred thousand pound sterling.

[Back to Top]

Marginalia1356.The same yeare, when kyng Edward had recouered Barwicke, and subdued Scotland: Prince Edward beyng in Gascome, made toward the French king. Who notwithstandyng by the way all bridges were cast downe, and great resistance made: yet the victorious Prince makyng way with his sword, after much slaughter of the Frenchmen, & many prisoners taken: at length ioynyng with the French kyng at Poyters, scarse with two M. gaue the ouerthrow to the French Kyng with vij. M. men of armes and mo. In which conflict the French kyng himselfe, and Philip his MarginaliaThe French k. taken prisoner by prince Edward.sonne wyth L. Iames of Bourbon, the Archb. of Senon. xi. Earles. 22. Lordes were taken. Of other warriors and men of armes aboue 2000. Some affirme in this conflict were slayne. 2. Dukes, of Lordes and noble men 24. of men of armes 2002. of other souldiers aboue viij. M. The common report is, that mo French men were there taken prisoners, then was the number of them which tooke them. This noble victory gotten by the grace of God, brought no litle admiration to all men.

[Back to Top]

It were too long, and litle pertayning to the purpose of thys history to comprehend in order all the doynges of thys kyng, wyth the circumstances of his victories, of the bringing in of the French k. into England, of hys abode there, of the raunsome leuied on hym and of Dauid the Scottishe kyng, of which the one was rated at 3. millions of Scutes, MarginaliaEuery Scute valuing 6. shillings 8. pencethe other at C. thousand markes to be payd in x. yeres, how the staple was after translated to Calys, with such like, I referre them that would see more, to the Chronicle of Tho. Walsing. of S. Albans, of Iohn Froysard. Adam Mirimouth, who discourse all this at large. 

Commentary  *  Close
Anti-papal writers

The Foxe Project was not able to complete the commentary on this section of text by the date by which this online edition was compiled (23 September 2008). This commentary will become available in due course from the 'Late Additions and Corrections' page of the edition.

[Back to Top]

In writing the storie and actes of Ludouicus the emperour, a litle aboue mention was made, Pag. 377. of certayne learned men which tooke the emperours part against the Pope. In number of whom was Marsilius Patauinus, Guliermus Ockam, Ioannes Gandauensis, Luitpoldus, Andreas Landensis, Vlricus Hangenor treasurer to the Emperour, Dantes, Aligerius, &c. MarginaliaMarsilius Patauinus, autor of the booke called Defensor pacis. Articles of Marsilius against the pope.Of whom Marsilius Patauinus compiled and exhibited vnto the Emperour Ludouicke, a worthy worke intituled Defensor pacis: written in the Emperours behalfe agaynst the Pope. Wherin (both godly and learnedly disputing agaynst the Pope) he proueth, all Byshops and Priestes to be equall: And that the pope hath no superioritie aboue other Byshops, much lesse aboue the Emperour. That the worde of God ought to be onely the chiefe iudge in decidyng and determinyng causes ecclesiasticall: That not onely spirituall persons, but lay men also beyng godly and learned, ought to be admitted into generall councels: That the Clergye and the pope ought to be subiect vnto Magistrates: That the Church is the vniuersitie of the faythfull, and that the foundation and head of the Church is Christ, and that he neuer appointed any vicare or pope, ouer hys vniuersall church: That Byshops ought to be chosen euery one, by their owne Church and Clergie: That the maryage of priestes may lawfully be permitted: That S. Peter was neuer at Rome: That the clergye and Synagoge of the pope is a denne of theeues: That the doctrine of the pope is not to be folowed, because it leadeth to eternall destruction: And that the corrupt maners of the Christians doe spring and flow out of the wickednes of the spiritualtie, &c. MarginaliaMerites cause of saluation, sine qua non.He disputeth moreouer in an other worke of free iustification by grace: And extenuateth merites, saying that they are no causes efficient of our saluation, but onely sine qua non, that is to say, that workes be no cause of our iustification, but yet our iustification goeth not wythout them. MarginaliaMarsilius condemned of the pope
Extrau. cap. Licet intra doctrinam.
For the which his doctrine most sounde and Catholike, he was condemned by the pope an. 1324. by the popes decree extrauagant. cap. Licet intra doctrina. Concernyng the which man & hys doctrine: I thought good thus much to commit to historie: to the entent men may see, that they which chardge thys doctrine now taught in the Church with the note of noueltie or newnes, how ignorant & vnskilfull they be in the histories and order of tymes forepast.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaIoannes Gandanensis condemned by the pope.In the same part of condemnation at the same tyme, also was Ioannes de Ganduno. an. 1330. and contayned also in the foresayd Extrauagant, wyth Marsilius Patauinus. Which Ioannes wrote much vpon Aristotle and Auerrois, and are yet remayning. And no doubt but he wrote also of diuinitie, but not vnlike that these workes haue bene abolyshed.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaGuillermus Ockam, wrote against the pope.In the same number and cataloge, commeth also Guillermus Ockam, who was in the yeare of our Lord. 1326 as is afore mentioned Pag. 377. and wrote likewise in defence of Ludouicus the Emperour agaynst the Pope: MarginaliaMichael generall of the gray friers, excommunicated for an heretike.and also in defence of Michael Generall of Grayfryers, whom the pope had excommunicated and cursed for an heretike. Diuers treatises were by the sayd Ockam set forth, whereof some are extant and in print, as his questions and distinctions: MarginaliaAscentioni in præfatione eius autoris.some are extinct and suppressed (as Ascentius reporteth) quod essent aliquando asperiora. MarginaliaThe dialoge betwene the souldiers and the clarke, of Ockams making.Some agayne be published vnder no name of the autor, being of hys doyng: as the dialoge betwene the soldiour and the clarke: wherin it is to be coniected, what bookes and workes this Ockam had collected agaynst the pope. Of this Ockam Iohn Sledane in his history inferreth mention, to his great commendation, whose wordes be these: William Ockam in time of Ludouicus. 4. Emperour did florishe, about the yeare

[Back to Top]
of
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield