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Dr Brewer

Chancellor to the bishop of Exeter, John Veysey

Dr Brewer attended the examination of Thomas Bennet. 1570, p. 1182; 1576, p. 1011; 1583, p. 1038.

 
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Dr David

Franciscan friar

Dr David was one of those seeking the identity of the person who had posted antipapal papers on the cathedral doors at Exeter in 1531. 1570, p. 1181; 1576, p. 1010; 1583, p. 1038.

 
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Edward Baskerville

(d. 1567) [Emden]

Franciscan friar, Oxford convent 1513; warden (1528 - 38); BTh 1527; DTh 1532; vice-commissary Oxford University 1534, 1535; chancellor of Hereford (1555 - 67); concerned with the prosecution of Thomas Bennet in 1532

Edward Baskerville was one of those seeking the identity of the person who had posted antipapal papers on the cathedral doors at Exeter in 1531. 1570, p. 1181; 1576, p. 1010; 1583, p. 1038.

 
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Gregory Basset

Franciscan friar 1521; Oxford convent 1530; Cambridge convent 1532; BTh Oxford 1532-3; recanted heretic; warden of Exeter convent at the dissolution in 1538; warrant issued in 1561 for his arrest as a 'common mass-sayer'

Gregory Basset was one of those seeking the identity of the person who had posted antipapal papers on the cathedral doors at Exeter in 1531. He had been in prison in Bristol for possessing one of Luther's works and for teaching the catechism. 1570, p. 1181; 1576, p. 1010; 1583, p. 1038.

After Thomas Benet's arrest, Basset tried particularly hard to get him to recant, staying day and night with him in prison. 1570, p. 1182; 1576, p. 1011; 1583, p. 1039.

 
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John Moreman

(c. 1490 - 1554) [ODNB]

b. South Hole, Harland, Devon. Roman Catholic priest; BA Oxford 1509; MA 1512; BD 1527; DD 1530; tutored John Hooker; prebendary in college of Glasney 1532; imprisoned early in Edward's reign along with Richard Crispyn; chaplain to Queen Mary

John Moreman was one of those seeking the identity of the person who had posted antipapal papers on the cathedral doors at Exeter in 1531. 1570, p. 1181; 1576, p. 1010; 1583, p. 1038.

 
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Peter Carslegh

(d. 1535) [Fasti]

DTh; canon and prebendary of Exeter (1500 - 35)

Peter Carslegh was one of those seeking the identity of the person who had posted antipapal papers on the cathedral doors at Exeter in 1531. 1570, p. 1181; 1576, p. 1010; 1583, p. 1038.

 
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Richard Crispyn

(d. 1551) [Fasti; Emden]

BA Oxford 1514; BTh 1527; DTh 1532; took part in the heresy trial of Thomas Bennet at Exeter; canon and prebendary of Exeter (1541 - 1551); chaplain to the marquis of Exeter; imprisoned in the Tower in 1547, died there

Richard Crispyn was one of those seeking the identity of the person who had posted antipapal papers on the cathedral doors at Exeter in 1531. 1570, p. 1181; 1576, p. 1010; 1583, p. 1038.

 
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Bristol
Bristoll, Brystoll, Bristow, Bristowe
NGR: ST 590 730

A city and county of itself, between the counties of Gloucester and Somerset. 34 miles south-west by south from Gloucester, 12 miles north-west from Bath. Bristol is the seat of a diocese, established in 1542. The city comprises the parishes of All Saints, St. Augustine, Christ Church, St. Owen, St. John Baptist, St. Leonard, St. Mary le Port, St. Mary Redcliffe, St. Michael, St. Nicholas, St. Peter, St. Werburgh, St. Stephen and St. Thomas. Also the Temple parish, and parts of St. James, St. Paul, St. Philip and St. Jacob. All are within the peculiar jurisdiction of the bishop. Christ Church, St. John Baptist, St. Mary le Port, St. Michael, St. Peter, St. Stephen and St. Werburgh are discharged rectories. St. Leonard, St. Mary Redcliffe, St. Nicholas, The Temple, St. Philip and St. Jacob are discharged vicarages. St. James and St. Thomas are perpetual curacies, the latter annexed to the vicarage of Bedminster, Archdeaconry of Bath, Diocese of Bath and Wells.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Exeter
NGR: SX 920 925

A city and county of itself, locally in the hundred of Wanford, county of Devon, of which it is the chief town. 10 miles north-north-west from Exmouth, 44 miles north-east from Plymouth. The city comprises 17 parishes, two chapelries, and the extra-parochial precinct of the cathedral; all in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Exeter, of which the town is the seat. 14 of the livings are discharged rectories; St John is a rectory not in charge; St David and St Sidwell are perpetual curacies.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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1062 [1038]

K. Hen. 8. The apprehension and examination of Tho. Benet. The maner of the Popes curse.

keping his own doings in secret, went the sonday folowing to the cathedral church to the Sermon, and by chaunce sate downe by 2. men, which were the busiest in al the city, in seking & searching for this heretike, and they beholding this Benet, sayd the one to the other. Surely thys fellowe by all likelyhoode is the heretike that hath set vp the billes, and it is good to examine him. MarginaliaBenet almost take in the church. Neuertheles whē they had wel behelde him, and saw the quiet and sober behauiour of the man, his attentiuenes to the preacher, his godlinesse in the Church, being alwayes occupied in hys Booke, which was a Testament in the Latine tongue, were astonied and had no power to speake vnto him, but departed & left hym reading in his booke. MarginaliaThe storyes a little vary touching the taking of Benet.As touching this poynte of Benets behauior in the Church, I finde the reportes of some other a litle to vary, and yet not much contrary one to the other. For in receiuing the letters and wrytings of a certain minister, whych at the same time was present at the doynge hereof in Exeter, thus I finde moreouer added concerning the behauiour of this Thomas Benet in the Church. 

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Vowell apparently sent Foxe documents and testimonies along with his own account of Dusgate.

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MarginaliaDoctors & friers in Exeter.At that time (sayth he) as I remember, doct. Moreman Crispin, Caseley wyth suche other, bare the swinge there. Beside these were there also preachers there, one Doctour Bascauild, an vnlerned doctor God knoweth, and one D. Dauid, as wel learned as he, both Gray friers, and doctor I know not who, a Blacke frier, not much inferiour vnto them. Moreouer there was one Bacheler of Diuinitie, a Gray frier, named Gregory Bassed, MarginaliaGregory Bassed Fryer of Exeter. in deede learned more then they all, but as blinde and superstitious as he whych was most. Whych Gregorie 

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At this time, Bassett was a member of the Oxford Franciscan convent. He would become warden of the Exeter Franciscan convent. This account of Bassett's imprisonment, in his younger days, for reading works of Luther is confirmed by Exeter City Muniments, Book 51, fo. 350r.

not long before, was reuolted from the way of righteousnes, to the way of Beliall: for in Bristowe (sayth the author) he lay in prison long, & almost famished, for hauing a booke of M. Luther, called his questions, which he a long time priuily had studied, & for teaching of youth a certaine Cathechisme. To be shorte, the braines of the Canons and Priests, the officers and commons of that Citie were very earnestly busied, howe or by what meanes suche an enormious heretique, whyche had pricked vp those billes, might be espied and knowen, but it was long first. At last the Priestes founde out a toye to curse him what soeuer he were, MarginaliaThe priestes curse they cannot tell whom. with booke, bel and candle, which curse at that day seemed most fearefull and terrible. The maner of the curse was after this sort.

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One of the Priestes, apparelled all in white, ascended vp into the pulpit. The other rabblement, wyth certaine of the two orders of Friers, and certaine superstitious Monks of S. Nicholas house 

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I.e., St. Nicholas's Priory, a Benedictine house in Exeter.

standing round about, and the Crosse (as the custome was) being holdē vp, with holy candles of waxe fixed to the same, he began his sermon wt this Theame of Iosue: Est blasphemia in Castris. There is blasphemie in the armie: 
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A reference to Joshua 6-7. The story of these chapters (and undoubtedly the theme of the sermon) was of Aachan, whose covert defiance of God's laws, brought destruction upon the Israelites until his sin was discovered and he was slain.

and so made a long protestation, but not so long as tedious and superstitious, and so concluded, that the foule and abominable heretike, which had put vp such blasphemous billes, was for that his blasphemie, damnably accursed, and besought God, our Lady, S. Peter Patrone of that church, with all the holy companie of martyrs, confessors, and virgines, that it might be knowen what hereticke had put vp such blasphemous billes, that Gods people might auoide the vengeance.

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MarginaliaThe manner of the popes blacke curse, with booke, bell, and candle.The maner of the cursing of the sayd Benet was maruelous to beholde, for as muche as at that time there was fewe or none, vnlesse a Sherman or two (whose houses I well remember were searched for billes at that time, and for bookes) that knew any thing of Gods matters, or how God doeth blesse theyr curses in such cases. Then sayde the Prelate, by the authoritie of God the father almighty, and of the blessed virgin Mary, of S. Peter and Paule, and of the holy Saints, we excommunicate, we vtterly curse and banne, commit and deliuer to the deuill of hell, him or her, MarginaliaHere is colde charitye. what soeuer he or shee be, that haue in spite of God and of S. Peter, whose church this is, in spite of all holy saintes, and in spite of our most holy father the Pope Gods vicare heere in earth, and in spite of the reuerend father in God, Iohn our Diocesane, and the worshipfull Canons, Maisters, and Priestes, and Clarkes, which serue God daily in this Cathedrall Church, fixed vppe with waxe such cursed and hereticall Billes full of blasphemie, vppon the doores of thys and other holy Churches wythin this Citie. Excommunicate plainely be hee or shee plenally, or they and deliuered ouer to the deuill, as perpetuall malefactors and schismatiques. Accursed might they be, and geuen body & soule to the deuill. MarginaliaBlesse, and curse not, saith the Lorde, Curse, & blesse not, saith the Pope.Cursed be they, he, or shee in Cities and townes, in fieldes, in wayes, in pathes, in houses, out of houses, and in all other places, standing, lying, or risinge, walking, running, waking, sleeping, eating, drinking, and what so euer thing they doe besides. Wee separate them, him, or her, from the thresholde, and from all the good praiers of the church, from the participation of the holy masse, from all Sacraments, Chappels, and aultars, from holyebread, and holy water, from al þe merites of Gods priests, and religious men, and from all their Cloisters, from all their pardones, priuileges, grauntes, and immunityes, whych all the holy fathers Popes of Rome haue graunted to them: and we geue them ouer vtterly to the power of the feend, and let vs quench their soules, if they be dead, thys night in the paines of hell fire, as this candle is nowe quenched, MarginaliaMarke the apishe pageantes of these Popelinges.and put out (and wyth that he put out one of the candles) and lette vs praye to God, (if they be aliue) that their eyes may be put out, as this candle light is) so he put out the other candle) and lette vs pray to God and to oure Lady, and to S. Peter and Paule, and all holye Saintes, that all the senses of their bodies maye faile them, and that they may haue no feeling, as nowe the light of this candle is gone (and so he putte out the thirde candle) except they, hee, or shee, come openly nowe and confesse their blasphemie, and by repentaunce (as muche as in them shall lye) make satisfaction to God, our Ladye, S. Peter, & the worshipfull companie of thys Cathedrall Church, and as thys holy Crosse staffe nowe falleth downe, so myghte they, except they repent and shewe them selues: and one firste taking away the Crosse, the staffe fell downe. But Lorde what a shoute and noyse was there, what terrible feare, what holding vp of handes to heauen, that cursse was so terrible.

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Now thys fond foolish phantasie and mockerie beyng done and played, which was to a Christian heart a thynge ridiculous, Benet could no longer forbear, but fel to great laughter, MarginaliaTho. Benet laugheth at their cursinge. but within him selfe, and for a great space coulde not cease: by the which thing the poore manne was espyed. 

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This was one of several conflicting accounts of how Dusgate was discovered.

For those that were next to him, wondryng at that greate curse, and beleeuing that it coulde not but light on one or other, asked good Benet for what cause he should so laugh. My frendes (sayd he) who can forbeare, seeing suche merie conceites and enterludes plaid of the priestes? Straitway a noyse was made, Heere is the heretike, heere is the heretike, holde him fast, holde him fast. With that there was a greate confusion of voyces, and much clapping of handes, and yet they were vncertain whether he were the heretike or no. Some say, that vppon the same he was taken and apprehended. Other report, that his ennemies being vncertaine of him, departed, and so he wēt home to his house. MarginaliaTho. Benet setteth vp newe billes.Where hee being not able to digest the lies there preached, renewed his former billes, and caused his boy early in the morning following, to set the sayd billes vpon the gates of the Churchyarde. 
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Morice would seem to corroborate this version; he states that Dusgate was spotted fixing his messages on the door of the cathedral and that his house was searched, whereupon incriminating documents were found (BL, Harley NS 419, fo. 125r-v).

As the boy was setting one of the sayde billes vpon a gate called the little stile, it chaunced that one W. S. going to the Cathedral church to heare a Masse called Bartons Masse, whych was then daily sayd about 5. of the clocke in the morning, founde the boye at the gate, and asking him whose boy he was, did charge him to be the heretike, which had set vp the billes vpon the gates, wherefore pulling downe the bill, he broughte the same together with the boy before the Maior of the citie, MarginaliaTho. Benet taken by meanes of his boy setting vp his Billes. and thereuppon Benet being knowen and taken, was violently committed to warde.

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On the morow began both the Canons and heades of the citie ioyned wt them, to fal to examination. With whom for þt day he had not much communication, MarginaliaTho. Benet willingly confesseth.but confessed & said to them, it was euen I that put vp those bils, and if it were to doe, I would yet doe it againe, for in them haue I written nothing but that is very truth. Couldste not thou (said they) as well haue declared thy mind by mouth, as by putting vp billes of blasphemie? No (sayd he) MarginaliaThe cause why Benet set vp his billes.I put vp the billes that many should read and heare what abominable blasphemers ye are, and that they might the better knowe your Antichrist the Pope to be the Bore out of the woode, which destroyeth & throweth downe the hedges of Gods church, for if I had ben heard to speake but one woorde, I should haue bene clapped fast in prisone, and the matter of God hidden. But now I trust more of your blasphemous doings will thereby be opened and come to light, for God wil so haue it, and no longer will suffer you.

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The next day after he was sent vnto the bish. who first cõmitted him vnto prison called the bishops prison, MarginaliaTho. Benet, sent to the Byshops prison. where he was kept in stocks & strong yron, with as much fauour as a dog shuld find. Then the B. associating vnto him one D. Brewer his chancelor 

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This is an error; John Gibbons was chancellor of Exeter diocese from 1522-1537.

, & other of his leude cleargy and friers, began to examine him & burden him, MarginaliaArticles layd against Benet.that cõtrary to the catholike faith, he denied praying to the saints, and also denied þe supremacie of the Pope. Whereunto he answered in such sober maner, & so learnedly proued & defended hys assertions, that he did not only confound and put to silence his aduersaries, but also brought thē in great admiratiõ of him, the most part hauing pitie & compassion on him. The friers tooke great paines with him, to perswade hym from his erronious opiniõs, to recant & acknowledge his fault touching the billes, but they did but dig after day, for God

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