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Anne Herbert (nèe Parr)

(before 1514 - 1552) [ODNB]

Daughter of Sir Thomas Parr; wife of William Herbert; countess of Pembroke (1551 - 52); maid in waiting to sister Queen Katherine

Stephen Gardiner and other enemies of Katherine Parr planned to accuse and arrest Lady Herbert, Lady Lane and Lady Tyrwhit and search their quarters for books and other evidence to use against the queen. 1570, p. 1423; 1576, p. 1213; 1583, p. 1243.

When Thomas Wriothesley with 40 of the king's guard came to arrest the queen and Lady Herbert, Lady Lane and Lady Tyrwhit, he found them walking happily in the garden with the king. The king sent him away. 1570, p. 1425; 1576, p. 1214; 1583, p. 1244.

 
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Elizabeth Tyrwhit (nèe Oxenbridge)

(d. 1578) [ODNB]

Lady Tyrwhit; author, courtier; married Sir Robert Tyrwhit; close to Katherine Parr; Katherine Parr was cousin by marriage to Robert through her own first husband; protestant sympathiser

Stephen Gardiner and other enemies of Katherine Parr planned to accuse and arrest Lady Herbert, Lady Lane and Lady Tyrwhit and search their quarters for books and other evidence to use against the queen. 1570, p. 1423; 1576, p. 1213; 1583, p. 1243.

When Thomas Wriothesley with 40 of the king's guard came to arrest the queen and Lady Herbert, Lady Lane and Lady Tyrwhit, he found them walking happily in the garden with the king. The king sent him away. 1570, p. 1425; 1576, p. 1214; 1583, p. 1244.

 
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George Owen

(c. 1499 - 1558) [ODNB]

MA Oxford 1521; BM 1525; DM 1528; physician to Henry VIII, Edward VI and Mary

King Edward said a private prayer on his deathbed which was overheard by his physician, George Owen. Owen was present at his death. 1563, p. 900; 1570, p. 1565; 1576, p. 1335; 1583, p. 1395.

 
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Maud (Matilda) Lane (nèe Parr)

(c. 1507 - 1558/9) [ODNB]

Lady Lane, courtier; Katherine Parr's cousin; married Ralph Lane; gentlewoman to the queen; protestant supporter

Stephen Gardiner and other enemies of Katherine Parr planned to accuse and arrest Lady Herbert, Lady Lane and Lady Tyrwhit and search their quarters for books and other evidence to use against the queen. 1570, p. 1423; 1576, p. 1213; 1583, p. 1243.

When Thomas Wriothesley with 40 of the king's guard came to arrest the queen and Lady Herbert, Lady Lane and Lady Tyrwhit, he found them walking happily in the garden with the king. The king sent him away. 1570, p. 1425; 1576, p. 1214; 1583, p. 1244.

 
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Thomas Wendy

(1499/1500 - 1560) [ODNB; Bindoff]

BA Cambridge 1519; MA 1522; MD Ferrara; JP Cambridge 1547; attended Cromwell in his last illness; physician to Henry VIII, Edward VI and Mary; fellow of the College of Physicians 1551; MP St Albans 1554; MP Cambridgeshire 1555

Henry VIII told one of his physicians of the charges against Katherine Parr; the physician was then sent to treat her when she fell ill, and he divulged the charges to her. 1570, p. 1423; 1576, p. 1213; 1583, p. 1243.

[NB: Foxe says this was Wendy, but it was possibly Robert Huicke, physician to both the king and queen. (ODNB sub Katherine Parr)]

Nicholas Ridley, Thomas Goodrich, Sir John Cheke, William May and Thomas Wendy, king's visitors, attended the disputation at Cambridge in 1549. 1570, p. 1555; 1576, p. 1326; 1583, p. 1376.

Thomas Wendy was one of those with Edward VI when he died. 1563, p. 900.

1267 [1243]

K. Hen.8. The trouble of Queene Katherine Parre. Queene Katherine sore sicke.

ledge in the Queenes case, althoughe very apparaunt reasons made for hym, and suche as his duetifull affection towardes his Maiestie, and the zeale and preseruatiō of hys estate, would scarcely geue hym leaue to conceyue, though the vttering thereof might thorowe her, and her faction, be the vetter destruction of hym, and of suche as in deede dyd chiefly tender the Princes saftie, wythout hys Maiestie would take vpon him to be their Protector, and as it were theyr Buckler. Whych if he would doe (as in respect of hys owne safetye hee ought not to refuse) he with others of hys faithfull Counsailours, coulde wythin shorte time disclose such treasōs, cloked with this cloke of heresy, that his maiestie should easily perceiue how perillous a matter it is to cherish a Serpent within hys owne bosome. Howbeit he would not for his parte willingly deale in the matter, both for reuerent respect aforesaid, and also for feare lest the faction was growen already too great, there with the princes safetie to discouer the same. And therewithall with heauie countenance and whispering together with them of þt secte there present, he helde his peace.

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MarginaliaWinchester abuseth the king with his flattering.These and such other kindes of Winchesters flattering phrases, marueilously whetted the king both to anger and displeasure towardes the Queene, and also to be ielous and mistrustfull of his owne estate. For the assuraunce whereof Princes vse not to be scrupulous to doe any thyng. Thus then Winchester wyth his flattering woordes, seeking to frame the kynges disposition after hys owne pleasure, so farre crept into the king at that time, and wyth doubtfull feares he with other his fellowes, so filled the kyngs mistrustfull minde, that before they departed the place, the king (to see belike what they would doe,) had geuen commandement, with warrant to certaine of them made for þt purpose, to consult together about the drawing of certaine articles against the Queene, wherin her life might be touched: which the king by their perswasions pretended to be fully resolued not to spare, hauing any rigour or coloure of law to countenance the matter. With this commission they departed for that time from the king, resolued to put theyr pernicious practise to as mischieuous an execution.

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MarginaliaHow Winchester and his fellowes deuise against the Gospellers.Duringe the time of deliberation about thys matter, they failed not to vse al kinds of policies, and mischieuous practises, aswell to suborne accusers, as otherwise to betray her, in seeking to vnderstand what bokes, by law forbidden, shee had in her closet. And the better to bring theyr purpose to passe, because they would not vpon the sodaine but by meanes deale wyth her, they thought it best, at the first, to begin with some of those Ladies whom they knew to be great with her, and of her bloud. The chiefest whereof, as most of estimation, and priuie to all her doings, were these: MarginaliaLady Harbert.the Lady Harbert, afterwarde Countesse of Pembroke and sister to the Queene, & chiefe of her priuie chamber: MarginaliaLady Lane.the Lady Lane, being of her priuie chamber, and also her cosine germane: MarginaliaLady Tyrwitte.the Lady Tyrwit of her priuye chamber, and for her vertuous disposition, in very great fauour and credite with her.

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It was deuised that these three aboue named shoulde first of all haue bene accused and brought to aunswer vnto the 6. articles: and vpon their apprehension in the Courte, their closet and coffers shoulde haue bene searched, þt somewhat might haue bene found, wherby the Queene myght be charged, which being found, þe Queene her selfe presently should haue bene taken, and likewise caried by barge by night vnto the Tower. MarginaliaWinchesters plateforme.This platforme thus deuised, but yet in the ende comming to no effecte, the king by those aforesayde, was foorthwith made priuie vnto the deuise by Winchester and Wrisley, and his consent therunto demanded. Who, (belike to prooue the byshops malice, how farre it would presume) like a wise politike Prince, was contented (dissemblingly) to geue his consent, and to alow of euery circumstance (knowing notwtstanding in the ende what he would doe. And thus the day, the time, and the place of these apprehensions aforesaide was appoynted: which deuise yet after was chaunged.

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The king at that time lay at White Hal, and vsed very seldome, being not well at ease, to stirre oute of hys chamber or priuie gallery: and few of his Counsell, but by especial commandement, resorted vnto him, these onely except: who by reason of this practise, vsed oftner then of ordinary to repaire vnto hym. This purpose so finely was handled, that it grewe now within fewe dayes of the tyme appoynted for the execution of the matter, & the poore Quene knew not nor suspected any thing at all: and therefore vsed after her accustomed manner, when shee came to visite the king, still to deale with hym touching Religion, as before shee did.

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The king al this while gaue her leaue to vtter her mind at the ful, without contradiction: not vpon any euil mindeor misliking (ye must cōceiue) to haue her speedy dispatche, but rather closely dissembling with them, to try out the vttermoste of Winchesters fetches. Thus after her accustomed conference wyth the kyng, when shee hadde taken her leaue of him (the time and daye of Winchesters finall day approching fast vpon) it chaunced that the king of himselfe vppon a certaine night after her being wyth him, and her leaue taken of hym, in misliking her Religion, brake the whole practise vnto one of hys Phisitions, eyther Doctor Windy, or els Owen, but rather Windy as is supposed: pretending vnto him, as though he intended not any longer to be troubled wyth such a Doctresse as shee was, and also declaring what trouble was in working againste her by certaine of her enemies, but yet charging him wythall, vpon peril of his life, not to vtter it to any creature liuing: and therupon declared vnto him the parties aboue named with all circumstances, and when and what the final resolution of the matter should be.

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The Queene all this while compassed about wyth enemies and persecutours, perceiued nothing of all thys, nor what was working against her, and what MarginaliaThe wiles of this Achitophell Wynchester dispatched.trappes were layde for her by Winchester and his fellowes: so closely the matter was conueied. But see what the Lorde God (who from his eternall throne of wisdome, seeth and dispatcheth all the inuentiōs of Achitophel, and comprehendeth þe wily beguily themselues) did for his pore handmaiden, in rescuing her from the pit of ruine, whereunto she was ready to fall vnawares.

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For as the Lorde would, so came it to passe, that the bill of Articles drawen againste the Queene, and subscribed with the kings own hand (although dissemblingly ye must understand) falling from the bosome of one of the foresayd Councellours, was founde and taken vp of some godly person, and brought immediately vnto the Queene. MarginaliaThe articles drawen agaynst the Quene how they came to her handes. Who reading there the Articles comprised against her, and perceiuing the kings owne hand vnto the same, for the sodain feare thereof, fell incontinent into a great melancholy and agonie, MarginaliaThe Quene in an agony bewailing and taking on in suche sorte, as was lamentable to see: as certaine of her Ladies and Gentlewomen beyng yet aliue, whiche were then present about her, can testifie.

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The king hearing what perplexitie she was in, almost to the pearil and danger of her life, sent his Phisitions vnto her. MarginaliaD. Wendy the kinges Phisition sent to the Queene Who traueling about her, and seing what extremity shee was in, did what they coulde for her recouerie. Then Wendy, who knew the case better then the other, and perceiuing by her words what þe matter was, according to that the king before had told him: for the comforting of her heauy minde, began to breake with her in secrete maner, touching the said articles deuised against her, which he himself (he sayde) knewe right well to be true: although he stode in danger of his life, if euer he were knowen to vtter the same to any liuing creature. Neuertheles, partly for the safety of her life, and partly for the discharge of his owne conscience, hauing remorse to consent to þe sheding of innocent bloud, he could not but geue her warning of that mischief that hāged ouer her head, beseching her most instantly to vse al secrecie in that behalfe, MarginaliaThe exhortation of D. Wendy to the Qeene.and exhorted her somewhat to frame and conforme her selfe vnto the kings minde, saying he did not doubt, but if she wold so do, and shew her humble submission vnto him, shee shoulde finde him gracious and fauourable vnto her.

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It was not long after this, but the king hearing of the daungerous state wherin she yet stil remained: came vnto her hymselfe. MarginaliaThe kinges comming to the Queene to comfort her. Vnto whome, after that shee had vttered her griefe, fearing lest his maiestie (she sayd) had taken displeasure with her, and had vtterly forsaken her: he like a louing husband wyth swete and comfortable wordes so refreshed & appeased her careful mind, that she vpon the same began somewhat to recouer, and so the king after he hadde taryed there about the space of an houre, departed.

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After this the Queene remembring with her selfe the wordes that M. Wendy had said vnto her, deuised how by some good oportunitie she myght repaire to the kings presence. And so first commanding her ladies to conuey away theyr bookes, which were against the lawe, the next nyght following after supper, shee (waited vpon only by he lady Harbert her sister and the Lady Lane, who caried the candle before her) went vnto the kings bed chamber, whome she found sitting and talking with certaine Gentlemen of his chamber. Whom when the king did beholde, very curteously he welcomed her, and breaking of the talke, whych before her comming he had wyth the Gentlemen aforsaid, began of himself, contrary to his maner before accustomed to enter into talke of religion, seming as it were, desirous to be resolued by the Queene of certaine doubtes which he propounded.

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