Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageNone
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Anne Askew (Kyme)

(c. 1521 - 1546) [ODNB]

Writer, protestant martyr; 2nd daughter of Sir William Askew of Lincolnshire; married name: Kyme

Anne Askew was brought before the Quest at her first examination at Sadler's Hall in 1545. She was then taken to the lord mayor, William Laxton, to be examined. 1563, p. 669; 1570, pp. 1413-14; 1576, p. 1205; 1583, pp. 1234-35.

Laxton committed Anne Askew to prison in the Counter after the examination and refused to take sureties. 1563, p. 670; 1570, p. 1414; 1576, p. 1205; 1583, p. 1235.

Her cousin Christopher Brittayn tried to get her bailed, and she was examined again, this time before Bishop Bonner. At the end of the examination, she signed a confession of faith. After petitions to Bonner from Brittayn and Hugh Weston, she was released from prison and bailed under her sureties, Brittayn and Francis Spilman. 1563, pp. 670-72; 1570, pp. 1414-15; 1576, pp. 1205-07; 1583, pp. 1235-36.

[Back to Top]

Anne Askew was examined a second time, before the king's council at Greenwich in 1546, where she was condemned. 1563, p. 683; 1570, p. 1417; 1576, p. 1208; 1583, p. 1237.

She became very ill and was in great pain. She asked to see Hugh Latimer, but was refused and sent to Newgate. She wrote to the council, to the lord chancellor and to the king, setting out her belief about the sacraments. 1563, pp. 683-75; 1570, pp. 1417-18; 1576, p. 1208; 1583, p. 1238.

Richard Rich and Sir John Baker went to Anne Askew in the Tower and tried to get her to incriminate others. 1563, p. 676; 1570, p. 1418; 1576, p. 1209; 1583, p. 1238.

Sir Anthony Knyvet had his jailer rack Anne Askew. When Knyvet refused to have the racking continued, Richard Rich and Thomas Wriothesley racked her themselves. She refused to give any information about others, but was released by Knyvet. 1563, p. 676; 1570, p. 1418; 1576, p. 1209; 1583, p. 1239.

She sent a reply from Newgate to a letter from John Lassells. 1563, p. 676; 1570, p. 1419; 1576, p. 1209; 1583, p. 1239.

Anne Askew was brought from Newgate to Smithfield in a chair because her torture had left her unable to walk. 1563, p. 677; 1570, p. 1419; 1576, p. 1211; 1583, p. 1240.

Wriothesley brought her letters offering the king's pardon if she recanted, but she refused. 1563, p. 677; 1570, p. 1419; 1576, p. 1211; 1583, p. 1240.

John Hemmysley, John Lasselles, John Adams and Anne Askew were burnt together at Smithfield. 1563, p. 666; 1570, p. 1421; 1576, p. 1211; 1583, pp. 1240-41.

Stephen Gardiner, in a letter to the Lord Protector, accused John Bale of regarding Anne Askew as a saint. 1563, p. 733; 1583, p. 1343.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Anne of Cleves

(1515 - 1557) [ODNB]

Queen of England (1540); 4th consort of Henry VIII; marriage annulled

Thomas Cromwell arranged the marriage between the king and Anne of Cleeves. 1570, p. 1295; 1576, p. 1109; 1583, p. 1134.

Henry VIII repudiated Anne of Cleves, divorced her and married Katherine Howard at the time of the execution of Cromwell. 1570, pp. 1361, 1385; 1576, pp. 1161, 1181; 1583, pp. 1190, 1210.

Not long before the king's death, Anne of Cleves, along with the king and Queen Katherine Parr and other noblewomen, attended a grand banquet for the French ambassador. 1570, p. 1426; 1576, p. 1215; 1583, p. 1245.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Claude d'Annebault

(1495 - 1552) French admiral; ambassador of France; governor of Normandy

When Claude d'Annebault went to see Henry VIII at Hampton Court, lavish entertainment was laid on for him, but he was recalled before he had received half of it. During the course of the banquet, he had private conversation with the king and Archbishop Cranmer about the reform of religion in the two countries. 1570, p. 1426; 1576, p. 1215; 1583, p. 1245.

[Back to Top]

Henry VIII expressed his intention to Thomas Cranmer and Claude d'Annebault to complete the reform of religion in England. 1570, p. 1478; 1576, p. 1254; 1583, p. 1291.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Edward Crome

(d. 1562) [ODNB]

Clergyman and religious controversialist

In his examination, James Bainham said that only Edward Crome and Hugh Latimer had preached the word of God sincerely and purely. 1570, p. 1169; 1576, p. 1000; 1583, p. 1027.

John Periman was charged in London in 1531 with holding heretical opinions. He said the only true preacher was Edward Crome. 1570, p. 1186; 1576, p. 1015; 1583, p. 1043.

Melancthon wrote a letter to Henry VIII against the Six Articles. In it he complained of the imprisonment of Hugh Latimer, Edward Crome and Nicholas Shaxton. 1570, p. 1341; 1576, p. 1144; 1583, p. 1173.

In prison after her first examination, Anne Askew asked to be confessed to Edward Crome, Gillam or John Huntingdon because she knew them to be wise men. 1563, p. 670; 1570, p. 1414; 1576, p. 1205; 1583, p. 1235.

In the Mercers' chapel during Lent in 1546, Crome preached a sermon designed to dissuade people from a belief in purgatory. He was arrested on Easter day and made to recant. 1570, p. 1413; 1576, p. 1205; 1583, p. 1234.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Edward Littleton

(by 1489 - 1558) [Bindoff]

MP Staffordshire (1529, 1539, 1553, 1554, 1555); sheriff of Staffordshire (1523 - 24, 1539 - 40, 1550 - 51); JP (1531 - 58)

Edward Littleton testified with Sir Hugh Calverley against George Blage. 1570, p. 1427; 1576, p. 1216; 1583, p. 1245.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Edward VI

(1537 - 1553) [ODNB]

King of England and Ireland (1547 - 53); Henry VIII's only son

The young Prince Edward wrote letters in Latin to Thomas Cranmer, his godfather. 1570, p. 1564; 1576, p. 1334; 1583, p. 1395.

Edward VI agreed with Sir John Cheke that clemency should be shown towards heretics and was opposed to the burning of Joan Bocher. Cranmer had great difficulty in getting Edward to sign her death warrant. 1563, p. 884; 1570, p. 1484; 1576, p. 1258; 1583, p. 1295.

Cranmer praised the learning and wisdom of Edward VI to his tutor, Richard Coxe. 1563, p. 884; 1570, p. 1484; 1576, p. 1258; 1583, p. 1295.

Jerome Cardan gave written testimony of Edward VI's knowledge of the liberal sciences. 1563, p. 885; 1570, p. 1485; 1576, p. 1259; 1583, p. 1296.

Charles V requested of Edward VI that his cousin Mary Tudor be allowed to have the mass said in her house. The request was denied, in spite of the strong urgings of Thomas Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley. 1563, p. 884; 1570, p. 1484; 1576, p. 1258; 1583, p. 1295.

Edward issued a set of injunctions to further the reformation of the church in the realm. He called a parliament to repeal earlier statutes relating to religion, including the Six Articles. 1563, pp. 685-91; 1570, pp. 1486-90; 1576, pp. 1260-63; 1583, pp. 1297-1301.

Having knowledge of rebellions stirring in the realm and of slackness in religious reform in the city of London, Edward called Edmund Bonner to come before his council. 1570, p. 1495; 1576, p. 1267; 1583, p. 1304.

Edward replied to the articles raised by the rebels of Devonshire. 1570, pp. 1497-99; 1576, pp. 1268-70; 1583, pp. 1305-07.

The king and privy council sent out letters to bishops and clergy in late 1549 and 1550, directing that books of Latin service be withdrawn, that altars be removed and communion tables installed. 1563, pp. 726-28; 1570, pp. 1519-21; 1576, pp. 1288-90; 1583, pp. 1330-31.

Edward wrote letters to his sister, Lady Mary, urging her to obey the new laws concerning religion, and she replied. 1576, pp. 1290-96; 1583, pp. 1333-39.

He sent his own councillors to Mary after her servants, Rochester, Englefield and Waldegrave, had failed to prevent masses being said in her household. 1576, pp. 1296-97; 1583, pp. 1338-39.

King Edward said a private prayer on his deathbed which was overheard by his physician, George Owen. In his will, Edward excluded his sister Mary from the succession because of her religious views. 1563, p. 900; 1570, p. 1565; 1576, p. 1335; 1583, p. 1395.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Katherine Parr

(1512 - 1548) [ODNB]

Queen of England, 6th consort of Henry VIII (1543 - 47)

Married (1) Edward Borough (1529 - 33); married (2) John Neville (1534 - 43); married (4) Thomas Seymour (1547 - 48)

Katherine Parr read and studied the scriptures and discussed them with her chaplains. The king was aware of this and approved, so she began to debate matters of religion with him. When the king became more ill-tempered because of his sore leg, her enemies, especially Stephen Gardiner and Thomas Wriothesley, took the opportunity to turn the king against her. 1570, pp. 1422-23; 1576, pp. 1212-13; 1583, pp. 1242-43.

[Back to Top]

Stephen Gardiner and other enemies of Katherine Parr planned to accuse and arrest Lady Herbert, Lady Lane and Lady Tyrwhit and search their quarters for books and other evidence to use against the queen. 1570, p. 1423; 1576, p. 1213; 1583, p. 1243.

Henry gave a warrant for the gathering of articles against Katherine. 1570, pp. 1422-23; 1576, pp. 1212-13; 1583, pp. 1242-43.

Henry told one of his physicians of the charges against Katherine. The list of charges fell from the clothing of the councillor carrying it and was found by a supporter of the queen, who carried it to her. She fell seriously ill when she saw it, and the king sent the same physician to treat her; he warned her of what the king had told him. 1570, p. 1423; 1576, p. 1213; 1583, p. 1243.

[Back to Top]

The king then visited Katherine, who explained that she was ill because she feared she had displeased him. She submitted humbly to him and was forgiven. 1570, p. 1423; 1576, p. 1213; 1583, p. 1243.

When Thomas Wriothesley with 40 of the king's guard came to arrest the queen and her ladies-in-waiting, he found them walking happily in the garden with the king. The king sent him away. 1570, p. 1425; 1576, p. 1214; 1583, p. 1244.

Katherine Parr quarrelled with her sister-in-law, Anne Seymour, duchess of Somerset, encouraging a rift between their husbands. 1570, p. 1545; 1576, p. 1317; 1583, p. 1367.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Master Hampton

Of Reading.

Master Hampton was engaged by enemies of Julins Palmer to befriend and then betray him. 1570, p. 2120, 1576, p. 1842 [recte 1831], 1583, p. 1937.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Ralph Morice

(fl. 1522 - 1570) [ODNB]

Principal secretary to Thomas Cranmer c. 1531; protestant reformer; BA Cambridge 1523; MA 1526; imprisoned for a time under Mary; source on martyrs for Foxe

Archbishop Cranmer asked his secretary to write up a book of Cranmer's arguments against the Six Articles to give to the king. Ralph Morice took the book with him when he went by boat to the city. He was caught up in bear-baiting on the river, and the book fell into the water. It was recovered by the bearward, who refused to return it. Morice went to Thomas Cromwell, who recovered the book from the bearward. 1570, p. 1355-56; 1576, p. 1157-58; 1583, p. 1185-86.

[Back to Top]

Cranmer told his secretary, Ralph Morice, that the letters he had written for Henry VIII to sign relating to reform in the church had never been signed. Gardiner had convinced the king that these reforms would jeopardise a league with the king of France and the emperor. 1570, p. 1426; 1576, p. 1215; 1583, p. 1245.

[Back to Top]

Morice witnessed Sir Anthony Denny report to Thomas Cranmer of the the attempt by Sir Anthony Browne to get Stephen Gardiner reinstated in the king's will. 1570, p. 1478; 1576, p. 1254; 1583, p. 1291.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Robert Holgate

(1481/2 - 1555) [ODNB]

BTh Cambridge 1524; DTh 1537; prior of St Catherine's-without-Lincoln 1529; master of the Gilbertines (1534 - 39); bishop of Llandaff (1537 - 45); archbishop of York (1545 - 1554); deprived for marriage

Robert Holgate was one of the subscribers to the Bishops' Book. 1570, p. 1211; 1576, p. 1037; 1583, p. 1064.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Anthony Denny

(1501 - 1549) [ODNB; Bindoff]

Courtier, keeper of the privy purse 1542; patron of humanist letters; supported reformation; privy councillor 1547; MP Ipswich 1529, MP Herts 547; JP Essex, Hertfordshire (1547 - death)

Anthony Denny was an especially close attendant at the deathbed of Henry VIII. When others were afraid, he informed the king that he was close to death and must prepare himself. 1570, p. 1477; 1576, p. 1253; 1583, p. 1290.

Sir Anthony Denny was a signatory to a letter to the king's commissioners relating Bishop Bonner's recantation of his protestation. 1570, p. 1502; 1576, p. 1273; 1583, p. 1310.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir George Blage

(c. 1512 - 1551) [Fines]

Grocer in Trinity the less parish, London; courtier; charged in 1541 with numerous offences; pardoned by Henry VIII

George Blage was one of those charged in London in the inquisition following the setting up of the commission to enforce the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1376; 1576, p. 1174; 1583, p. 1203.

The Sunday before Anne Askew was executed, Thomas Wriothesley had George Blage sent to Newgate and then to the Guild Hall, where he was condemned to be burnt. 1570, p. 1427; 1576, p. 1216; 1583, p. 1245.

John Russell made suit to the king on Blage's behalf, and he was pardoned. 1570, p. 1427; 1576, p. 1216; 1583, p. 1246.

George Blage was a deponent in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 812

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Hugh Calverley

Accuser of George Blage

Sir Hugh Calverley testified with Edward Littleton against George Blage. 1570, p. 1427; 1576, p. 1216; 1583, p. 1245.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Wriothesley

(1505 - 1550) [ODNB]

Administrator; Cromwell's private secretary; engraver of the Tower mint 1536; MP Hampshire (1539, 1542); JP Hampshire (1538 - 46)

Principal secretary to the king (1540 - 44); clerk of the crown and king's attorney (1542 - 50); privy councillor (1540 - 47, 1548 - 50); lord chancellor (1544 - 47)

Baron Wriothesley 1544; 1st earl of Southampton (1547 - 50)

Stephen Gardiner had Wriothesley and other privy councillors on his side when he reported Windsor heretics to the king. 1570, p. 1390; 1576, p. 1185; 1583, p. 1214.

Wriothesley took part in the examination of John Marbeck. 1570, p. 1390; 1576, p. 1186; 1583, p. 1214.

Katherine Parr read and studied the scriptures and discussed them with her chaplains. The king was aware of this and approved, so she began to debate matters of religion with him. When the king became more ill-tempered because of his sore leg, her enemies, especially Stephen Gardiner and Thomas Wriothesley, took the opportunity to turn the king against her. 1570, pp. 1422-23; 1576, pp. 1212-13; 1583, pp. 1242-43.

[Back to Top]

When Wriothesley with 40 of the king's guard came to arrest the queen and her ladies-in-waiting, he found them walking happily in the garden with the king. The king sent him away. 1570, p. 1425; 1576, p. 1214; 1583, p. 1244.

Wriothesley was one of the questioners at the second examination of Anne Askew in 1546. 1563, p. 683; 1570, p. 1417; 1576, p. 1208; 1583, p. 1237.

Sir Anthony Knyvet had his jailer rack Anne Askew. When Knyvet refused to have the racking continued, Richard Rich and Thomas Wriothesley racked her themselves. She refused to give any information, but was released by Knyvet. 1563, p. 676; 1570, p. 1418; 1576, p. 1209; 1583, p. 1239.

The Sunday before Anne Askew was executed, Thomas Wriothesley had George Blage sent to Newgate and then to the Guild Hall, where he was condemned to be burnt. 1570, p. 1427; 1576, p. 1216; 1583, p. 1245.

Wriothesley was present at Anne Askew's burning. He brought her letters offering the king's pardon if she recanted, but she refused. 1570, p. 1419; 1576, p. 1211; 1583, p. 1240.

Thomas Wriothesley was one of the signatories to the proclamation against Edward Seymour calling for his removal. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

He was one of the signatories to the letter to the lord mayor and common council of London from the lords opposing Edward Seymour. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1319; 1583, p. 1369.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Hampton Court Palace

East Molesey, Surrey

OS grid ref: TQ 157 685

1269 [1245]

K. Hen.8. Talke betweene the king and the French Ambassadour. Syr George Blage condemned.

with to pull downe the Roodes in euery churche, and to suppresse the accustomed ringing on Alhalow night, wyth a few such like vaine ceremonies: MarginaliaThe kinges conference with D. Cranmer about reformation of the Ghurch. Rood loftes. Ringing on Alhallow night And therefore, when the said Archb. taking his leaue of the king, to go into Kent his dioces, his highnes willed him to remember that he shuld cause 2. letters MarginaliaLettets of reformation to be sent by the king. to be deuised: for me (quoth the King) to be signed, the one to be directed vnto you my Lorde, and the other vnto the Archbishop of Yorke, wherein I will commaund you both to send forth your precepts vnto all other Byshops wythin your prouinces, to see those enormities and Ceremonies reformed vndelaidly that we haue communed off.

[Back to Top]

So vppon this, the kings pleasure knowen, when the Archbishop of Canterburye was then come into Kent, hee caused his Secretarye to conceiue and write these Letters according to the kings minde, and being made in a readinesse, sent them to the Courte to Syr Anthony Denie, for hym to get them signed by the king, when maister Denie had mooued the king thereunto, the king made answere: MarginaliaThe kinges minde altered by Wint.I am now otherwayes resolued, for you shal send my Lorde of Canterburye worde, that sithence I shake with hym about these matters, I haue receiued letters from my Lord of Winchester, nowe being on the other side of the Sea, about the conclusion of a league betweene vs, the Emperor and the Frenche king, & he wryteth plainely vnto vs, that the league wil not prosper nor go forward, if we make any other innouation, change, or alteration, either in Religion or ceremonies, then heretofore hath ben already commensed and done. MarginaliaReformation of Religion stopped by Steuen Gardiner.Wherefore my Lorde of Canterburye must take patience heerein, and forbeare vntill we may espye a more apt and conuenient time for that purpose.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaAnno. 1546.Which matter of reformation began to be reuiued again, at what time the great Ambassador MarginaliaThis Ambassadour was admirall of Fraunce whose name was Mounsieur de Annebault, he came to Hampton Court the 20. day of Aug. an. 1546. from the French king, came to the kings Maiestie at Hampton Courte not long before his death. MarginaliaThe matter of reformation againe renued a little before the kinges death. Where then no Gentleman was permitted to waite vpon his Lord and maister, wythout a vcluet coate and a chaine of golde. And for that entertainment of the Ambassadour, were builded in the parke there, 3. very notable great and sumptuous banketting houses. At the which it was purposed, that the sayd Ambassadour should haue bene 3. sundry nightes very richly banketted. But as it chaunced, the French kings great affaires were then sodenly such, that thys Ambassadoure was sent for home in post hast, before he had receiued halfe the noble entertainement that was prepared for him, so that he hadde but the fruition of the first banketting house.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe kinges bancket for the French Ambassadour.Now what princelike order was there vsed in the furniture of þt banket, as well in placing of the noble estates, namely the kings Maiestie, and the French Ambassadour wt the noblemen both of England and Fraunce on the one parte, and of the Queenes highnesse and the Ladye Anne of Cleeue with other noble women & Ladyes of the other part, as also touching the great & sumptuous preparation of both costly and fine dishes there out of number spent, it is not our purpose heere presently to entreate thereof, but onely to consider the note of the conference and communication had the first night after the sayd bāket was finished, betweene the kings Maiestie, the sayde Ambassadour, and the Archbishop of Canterburye MarginaliaSecrete communicatiō betwene the king the French Ambassadour, and the Archb, of Cant. (the kings highnesse standing openly in the banketting house, in the open face of all the people, and leaning one arme vpon the shoulder of the Archbisop of Canterbury, and the other arme vppon the shoulder of the Ambassadour) touching the establishing of godly religion betweene those two Princes in both theyr realmes: As by the report of the sayd Arch. vnto hys secretarie vppon occasion of his seruice to be done in king Edwards visitation, then being register in the same visitation, relation was made on that behalfe in thys sorte.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe testimony and credite of the story.When the sayd visitation was put in a readines, before the Commissioners should proceede in their viage, the said Archb. sent for the sayde Register MarginaliaThe name of this Register was M. Morice secretarye sometymes to the Archb. Thomas Cranmer. his man vnto Hampton Courte, and willed him in any wise to make notes of certaine things in the sayde visitation: whereof hee gaue vnto hym instruction, hauing then further talke with hym touching the good effect and successe of the sayde visitation. Vpon which occasion the Register sayde vnto hys maister the Archbyshop: I doe remember that you not long agoe, caused me to conceiue and write letters, which king Henry the 8. shuld haue signed and directed vnto your grace, and the Archbishoppe of Yorke, for the reformation of certayne enormities in the churches, as taking down of the roodes, and forbidding of ringing on Alhalow night, and such like vaine ceremonies. Whiche letters your grace sent to the Courte to be signed by the kinges Maiestie, but as yet I thinke that there was neuer any thing done therein.

[Back to Top]

Why, quoth the Archbishop againe, neuer hearde you how those letters were suppressed and stopped? Wherunto the Archbyshops seruaunt aunswering againe: as it was(sayde hee) my duetie to wryte those letters: so was it not my part to be inquisitiue what became thereupon. Marye, quoth the Archbishop, my Lord of Winchester then beyng beyond the seas, about a cōclusion of a league betwene the Emperour, the Frenche king, & the king our maister, and fearing þt some reformation should here passe in the realme touchinge Religion in hys absence, againste hys appetite, MarginaliaMarke the mischeuous fetches of this olde Foxe Winchester.wrote to the kinges Maiestie, bearing hym in hande, that the league then towardes, woulde not prosper nor go forwardes on his Maiesties behalfe, if he made any other innouation or alteration in Religion, or Ceremonies in the Church, then was already done: which hys aduertisement herein caused the king to staye the signing of those letters, as Syr Anthonie Denie wrote to me by the Kinges commaundement.

[Back to Top]

Then said his seruaunt againe vnto hym: Forasmuche as the kings good intent tooke no place then, nowe youre grace may goe forward in those matters, the oportunity of the time much better seruing thereunto then in king Henries daies.

Not so, quoth the Archbyshop. It was better to attempt such reformation in king Henry the viij. his dayes, then at thys time, the King beinge in hys infancie. For if the kings father had set foorth any thyng for the reformation of abuses, who was he that durste gainesay it? Marye, we are now in doubt how men will take the change or alteration of abuses in the Church, and therefore the Counsaile hath forborne specially to speake thereof, and of other thyngs, whych gladly they woulde haue reformed in thys visitation, referring all those & suche like matters, vnto the discretions of the visitours. But if King Henrye the viij. had liued vnto this day, wt the french king, it has bene past my L. of Winchesters power, to haue visured the kynges highnes as he did, when he was about the same league.

[Back to Top]

I am sure you were at Hampton Courte, quoth the Archb. when the French kings ambassador was entertained there at those solemne banketting houses, not long before the kings death: namely, when after the bankette was done the first night, the king leaning vpō the Ambassador and vpon me, if I should tel what communicatiō betwene the kings highnes and the said Ambassador was had, concerning the establishing of sincere Religion then, a manne would hardly haue beleued it. Nor I my selfe had thought the kings highnes had ben so forward in those matters as then appeared. I may tell you it passed the pulling downe of Roodes, and suppressing the ringing of bels, I take it þt few in England would haue beleued, that the MarginaliaThe purpose of K. Henry and of the French king a little before their deathes.kings Maiestie, and the French king had bene at thys poynt, not only within halfe a yeare after to haue chaunged the masse in both the realmes into a communion, as we now vse it, but also vtterly to haue extirped, and banished the Byshop of Rome and his vsurped power, out of both their realms and dominions.

[Back to Top]

Yea they were so throughly and firmely resolued in that behalfe, that they ment also to exhort the Emperour to doe the like in Flaunders and other his Countreis and Seniories, or els to breake of from him. And heerein the kyngs highnes willed mee (quoth the Archbishop) to pen a forme thereof to be sent to the Frenche king to consider of. But the deepe & most secrete prouidence of almighty God, owing to this realme a sharpe scourge for our iniquities, preuented (for a time) this theyr most godly deuise and intent, by taking to his mercy both these Princes.

[Back to Top]
A briefe narration of the trouble of Syr George Blage.

HEere woulde also something be sayde of MarginaliaSyr George Blage falsely accused.Syr George Blage one of þe kings priuy chamber, who being falslye accused by syr Hugh Cauerley knighte, and M. Littleton, was sent for by Wrisley L. Chauncellour the sonday before Anne Askew suffered, MarginaliaSyr George Blage sent to Newgate & condēned.& the next day was caried to Newgate, & from thence to Guild Hal, where he was cōdemned the same day, & appoynted to be burned the wensday folowing. The words which his accusers laid vnto him, were these. MarginaliaThe cause of his condemnation.What if a mouse should eat the bread? then by my cōsent they should hang vp the mouse. Wheras in dede these words he neuer spake as to hys liues ende hee protested. But þe truth, as he sayd, was this, that they MarginaliaThe crafty vndermining of these false accuserscraftely to vndermine him, walking wþt him in Pauls church after a sermon of D. Crome, asked if he were at the Sermon, and he said yea, I beard say (saith M. Litleton) that he sayd in his sermō that the masse profiteth neither for the quick nor for the dead. No saide M. Blage, wherefore then? belike for a gentleman when he rideth a hunting to kepe his horse frō stumbling, & so they departing immediately after he was apprehended (as is shewed) and condemned to be burned, when this was heard among them of the priuye chamber, the king hearing thē whispering together) whych he could

[Back to Top]
neuer
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield