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Edward Seymour

(c. 1500 - 1552) [ODNB]

Soldier; viscount Beauchamp of Hache 1536; earl of Hertford 1537

Lord high admiral 1542; lord great chamberlain 1543

Duke of Somerset 1547; lord protector 1547; lord treasurer 1547; earl marshal 1547; beheaded

Because Edward VI was only young when he came to the throne, his uncle Edward Seymour was assigned as overseer and protector of both the king and the commonwealth. He abolished the Six Articles and brought into the country learned reformers. He replaced some of the unlearned clergy with preachers. 1563, p. 684; 1570, p. 1486; 1576, p. 1259; 1583, p. 1296.

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Edward Seymour stood against the bishops of Chichester, Norwich, Lincoln, London and others at the consultation at Windsor in the first year of Edward VI's reign. 1570, p. 1551; 1576, p. 1322; 1583, p. 1372.

Seymour granted a pardon to Thomas Dobbe, but Dobbe died in prison before it could reach him. 1563, p. 685; 1570, p. 1486; 1576, p. 1260; 1583, p. 1297.

He was a signatory to a letter from the king and privy council to Nicholas Ridley, directing him to remove and destroy all altars within the churches of his diocese and install communion tables. 1563, p. 727; 1570, pp. 1519-20; 1576, p. 1288; 1583, p. 1331.

Seymour wrote a reply to a letter of Stephen Gardiner objecting to the destruction of images in Portsmouth. 1563, p. 730-31; 1570, pp. 1519-20; 1576, p. 1298; 1583, p. 1331.

Seymour was in regular correspondence with Stephen Gardiner while he was imprisoned in the Fleet. 1563, pp. 730-54; 1570, pp. 1519-25; 1576, pp. 1298-1300; 1583, pp. 1331-50.

Edward Seymour, John Russell, John Dudley and Sir William Petre visited Stephen Gardiner in the Tower at various times to attempt to get him to accept the king's reforms. 1563, p. 766; 1570, p. 1532; 1576, p. 1306; 1583, p. 1356.

After the victorious return of John Dudley, earl of Warwick, from Norfolk, he fell into dispute with Edward Seymour. He and other dissatisfied nobles met together to plan to remove the king from the Lord Protector. John Russell replied, hoping for a reconciliation between the Lord Protector and his adversaries. 1570, pp. 1545-46; 1576, pp. 1317-18; 1583, pp. 1367-68.

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Edward Seymour wrote to John Russell, describing the conspiracy against him and asking him to bring forces to Windsor. 1570, pp. 1545-46; 1576, p. 1317; 1583, p. 1367.

The king sent a letter to the lord mayor of London, Henry Amcottes; the mayor-elect, Sir Rowland Hill; the aldermen and common council, directing that 1000 troops be mustered to defend the Lord Protector. The lords opposing the Lord Protector sent a letter on the same day directing the mayor and council not to obey any instructions coming from him. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1319; 1583, p. 1369.

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The lords opposed to the Lord Protector sent Sir Philip Hoby to put their case to the king. As a result, the Lord Protector was imprisoned in Windsor Castle and then taken to the Tower. Shortly after, he was released. 1570, pp. 1548-49; 1576, p. 1320; 1583, p. 1370.

Seymour was imprisoned again in 1551 and charged with treason and felony. He was acquitted of treason, but condemned for felony, intending the death of John Dudley, duke of Northumberland, and others. On 22 January 1552 he was taken to Tower Hill and beheaded. 1570, pp. 1549-50; 1576, p. 1321; 1583, p. 1371.

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Foxe compares the story of Edward Seymour with that of Humphrey of Lancaster, dealing with his enemy Bishop Beaufort. 1563, pp. 882-84; 1570, p. 1551; 1576, p. 1322; 1583, p. 1372.

Edward Seymour is given as an example of one wrongly accused and judged. 1570, p. 1360; 1576, p. 1161; 1583, p. 1189.

 
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Henry Fitzalan

(1512 - 1580) [ODNB]

Earl of Arundel (1544 - 80); deputy of Calais (1540 - 44); lord chamberlain, privy councillor

Henry Fitzalan was one of the signatories of the letter of the council addressed to Thomas Cranmer ordering the abolishing of images in all churches in the archdiocese. 1570, p. 1490; 1576, p. 1263; 1583, p. 1300.

He was a signatory to a letter from the council to the bishops, instructing them to administer communion in two kinds. 1563, p. 692; 1570, p. 1491; 1576, p. 1264; 1583, p. 1301.

He was one of the signatories to the proclamation against Edward Seymour calling for his removal. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

He was one of the signatories to the letter to the lord mayor and common council of London from the lords opposing Edward Seymour. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1319; 1583, p. 1369.

 
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John Russell

(c. 1485 - 1555) [ODNB]

Courtier, diplomat. MP Buckinghamshire 1529; JP Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire, Hertfordshire, Huntingdonsshire, Northamptonshire 1533; MP Devon, Cornwall, Dorset, Somerset 1539

Henry VIII's controller of the royal household 1536; lord privy seal (1542 - 55); lord high admiral 1540

Baron Russell 1539; earl of Bedford (1550 - 55)

John Russell had been saved from danger while abroad by Thomas Cromwell and later commended him to the king. 1570, p. 1348; 1576, p. 1150; 1583, p. 1179.

John Russell was a signatory to a letter to the king's commissioners relating Bishop Bonner's recantation of his protestation. 1570, p. 1502; 1576, p. 1273; 1583, p. 1310.

John Russell was one of the signatories of the letter of the council addressed to Thomas Cranmer ordering the abolishing of images in all churches in the archdiocese. 1563, p. 692; 1570, p. 1490; 1576, p. 1263; 1583, p. 1300.

He was a signatory to a letter from the council to the bishops, instructing them to administer communion in two kinds. 1570, p. 1491; 1576, p. 1264; 1583, p. 1301.

He was a signatory to a letter of commission against Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 777.

Sir John was appointed lieutenant-general of the king's troops in the west at the time of the Western Rising. Although outnumbered, his forces defeated the rebels and captured their leaders. 1570, pp. 1499-1500; 1576, pp. 1271-72; 1583, pp. 1307-08.

George Blage had been condemned to be burnt for heresy. John Russell made suit to the king on Blage's behalf and he was pardoned. 1570, p. 1427; 1576, p. 1216; 1583, p. 1246.

John Russell was present at Anne Askew's burning. 1570, p. 1419; 1576, p. 1211; 1583, p. 1240.

He was a signatory to a letter from the king and privy council to Nicholas Ridley, directing him to remove and destroy all altars within the churches of his diocese and install communion tables. 1563, p. 727; 1570, pp. 1519-20; 1576, p. 1288; 1583, p. 1331.

Edward Seymour, John Russell, John Dudley and Sir William Petre visited Stephen Gardiner in the Tower at various times to attempt to get him to accept the king's reforms. 1563, pp. 766; 1570, p. 1532; 1576, p. 1306; 1583, p. 1356.

Edward Seymour wrote to John Russell, describing the conspiracy against him and asking him to bring forces to Windsor. John Russell replied, hoping for a reconciliation between the Lord Protector and his adversaries. 1570, pp. 1545-46; 1576, pp. 1317-18; 1583, pp. 1367-68.

Russell was a deponent in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, pp. 814, 824-25.

John Russell was a witness in 1551 to the sentence against Stephen Gardiner and his appellation. 1563, p. 867.

 
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Sir Anthony Wingfield

(ante 1488 - 1552) [ODNB; Bindoff]

Soldier, administrator. MP Suffolk 1529, 1539, 1542, 1547; MP Horsham 1545; JP Suffolk (1510 - death); sheriff Norfolk and Suffolk (1515 - 16); privy councillor (1539 - death)

Vice-chamberlain (1539 - 50); captain of the guard 1539; comptroller of the royal household (1550 - 52)

Sir Anthony Wingfield attended the examination of John Marbeck. When Marbeck was returned to the Marshalsea, Wingfield ordered that he be treated kindly and that his money be protected. 1570, p. 1390; 1576, p. 1186; 1583, p. 1214.

Wingfield was one of the signatories of the letter of the council addressed to Thomas Cranmer ordering the abolishing of images in all churches in the archdiocese. 1563, p. 692; 1570, p. 1490; 1576, p. 1263; 1583, p. 1300.

He was a signatory to a letter from the council to the bishops, instructing them to administer communion in two kinds. 1570, p. 1491; 1576, p. 1264; 1583, p. 1301.

Stephen Gardiner preached a sermon contrary to the king's injunctions. He was arrested and taken to the Tower by Sir Anthony Wingfield and Sir Ralph Sadler; Sadler and William Hunnings were instructed to seal off doors to his house. He was transferred to the Fleet. 1563, pp. 728, 760; 1570, pp. 1521, 1529; 1576, pp. 1297, 1304; 1583, pp. 1340, 1353-54.

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Anthony Wingfield was a deponent in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, pp. 804-5

After Edmund Bonner was sentenced to prison and deprived of his bishopric, the king appointed Lord Rich, Henry marquess of Dorset, Thomas Goodrich, Lord Wentworth, Sir Anthony Wingfield, Sir William Herbert, Nicholas Wotton, Edward Montague, Sir John Baker, Judge Hales, John Gosnold, John Oliver and Griffith Leyson to examine his documents. They confirmed the sentence against him. 1563, p. 725; 1570, p. 1519; 1576, pp. 1287-88; 1583, p. 1330.

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The king sent Richard Lord Rich, Sir Anthony Wingfield and Sir William Petre to his sister, Lady Mary, to ensure she and her household complied with the new laws on religion. 1576, pp. 1296-97; 1583, pp. 1338-39.

 
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Thomas Seymour

(c. 1509 - 49) [ODNB]

Lord admiral (1547 - 49); MP Wiltshire 1545; privy councillor (1547 - 49); JP Berkshire, Devon, Essex, Gloucestershire, Hampshire, Herefordshire, Hertfordshire, Kent, Middlesex, Shropshire, Sussex, Wiltshire, Worcestershire 1547

Brother of Jane and Edward, duke of Somerset. Executed for treason

Thomas Seymour was a signatory to a letter to the king's commissioners relating Bishop Bonner's recantation of his protestation. 1570, p. 1502; 1576, p. 1273; 1583, p. 1310.

Thomas Seymour was one of the signatories of the letter of the council addressed to Thomas Cranmer ordering the abolishing of images in all churches in the archdiocese. 1563, p. 692; 1570, p. 1490; 1576, p. 1263; 1583, p. 1300.

Thomas Seymour worked in harmony with his brother Edward, but his marriage to Katherine Parr produced ill feeling between them. He was accused of planning to secure the crown for himself and was beheaded on Tower Hill. 1563, p. 880; 1570, p. 1545; 1576, p. 1317; 1583, p. 1367.

Thomas Seymour is given as an example of one wrongly accused and judged. 1570, p. 1360; 1576, p. 1161; 1583, p. 1189.

 
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Thomas Thirlby

(1506? - 1570) [ODNB]

BCL Cambridge by 1521; DCL 1528; DCnL 1530; auditor for Cambridge University 1530/31

Archdeacon of Ely by 1534; bishop of Westminster (1540 - 50); bishop of Norwich (1550 - 54); bishop of Ely (1554 - 50)

When Thomas Thirlby was a scholar at Cambridge, he often played the recorder in his room. At such times Thomas Bilney, living in the room above, would begin to pray. 1563, p. 482.

Thomas Thirlby was one of the learned men at Cambridge supported by the Boleyns. 1563, p. 509; 1570, p. 1198; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

Thirlby was resident ambassador to France with Stephen Gardiner in 1538. 1570, p. 1239; 1576, p. 1061; 1583, p. 1088.

In a letter to Thomas Cromwell, Edmund Bonner asks for financial help, mentioning that he owes money to Thomas Thirlby and Simon Haynes. 1570, p. 1240; 1576, p. 1062; 1583, p. 1088.

Edward VI's councillors and Edward Seymour wrote to Thomas Cranmer, directing that candles no longer be carried on Candlemas, nor palms on Palm Sunday, nor should ashes be used on Ash Wednesday. Cranmer immediately wrote to the other bishops, including Bonner, to inform them of the new directive. Bonner consented to the changes and wrote to Thomas Thirlby to inform him of them. 1563, p. 685; 1570, p. 1486; 1576, p. 1260; 1583, p. 1297.

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The council wrote further to Cranmer ordering the abolishing of images in all churches in the archdiocese. He wrote to Edmund Bonner, directing him to carry out the order in London, and Bonner in turn wrote to Thomas Thirlby. 1570, p. 1490; 1576, p. 1263; 1583, p. 1300.

Thomas Thirlby was a deponent in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, pp. 829-30, 855.

 
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William Paget

(1505/6 - 1563) [ODNB]

Diplomat and administrator; JP Middlesex (1537 - death), MP Buckinghamshire (1547 - death), MP Derbyshire 1547, MP Staffordshire (1547 - death); MP Middlesex 1545, MP Staffordshire 1547; privy councillor (1543 - death); clerk to the privy council 1540; clerk of the parliament (1541 - 49)

1st Lord Paget of Beaudesert (1549 - 63); lord privy seal (1556 - 58)

William Paget was one of the learned men at Cambridge supported by the Boleyns. He supported Barnes and other protestants at that time, supplying books and helping monks leave their orders. 1563, p. 509; 1570, p. 1198; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

Paget was present at the second examination of Anne Askew in 1546. 1563, p. 683; 1570, p. 1417; 1576, p. 1208; 1583, p. 1237.

William Paget was a signatory to a letter to the king's commissioners relating Bishop Bonner's recantation of his protestation. 1570, p. 1502; 1576, p. 1273; 1583, p. 1310.

William Paget was one of the signatories of the letter of the council addressed to Thomas Cranmer ordering the abolishing of images in all churches in the archdiocese. 1563, p. 692; 1570, p. 1490; 1576, p. 1263; 1583, p. 1300.

Paget was a signatory to a letter of commission against Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 777.

The king sent a letter to the lord mayor of London, Henry Amcottes; the mayor-elect, Sir Rowland Hill; the aldermen and common council, directing that 1000 troops be mustered to defend the Lord Protector. The lords opposing the Lord Protector had knowledge of the letter before it arrived, possibly through Lord Paget, who was then with the king and Edward Seymour. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1319; 1583, p. 1369.

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William Paget, Andrew Baynton and Thomas Chaloner were deponents in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, pp. 814-18; 1570, p. 1536; 1576, p. 1309; 1583, p. 1359.

 
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Somerset Place

Somerset House, a palace built by Edward Seymour, duke of Somerset; begun in 1547

1324 [1300]

K. Edward 6. Iniunctions by the king in his visitation for reformation of religion.

can best desire. Written in hast at my house in London, the said 28. day of Ianuary. 1548.

Your good Lordships to command,
Edmund London.
 

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Edmund Bonner.

MarginaliaContention amongest the people for Images.Now about that present tyme credible and certain report was made vnto the Lords of the counsaile, that great contention and strife did daily arise among the common people in diuers partes of this Realme, for the pullyng downe and takyng away of such Images out of the churches, as had bene idolatrously abused by pilgrimage, offerings, or otherwyse (accordyng to the tenure of one of the Iniunctions geuen by the kyng in his late visitation) some affirmyng that that Image was abused, others that this, and most, that neyther of them both: so that if speedy remedy were not had therin, it might turne to further inconuenience. Wherefore they, by one aduise thinkyng it best (of good experience) for the auoidyng of all discorde and tumult, that all maner Images should be cleane taken out of all Churches, and none suffered to remayne, did thereupon agayne write their letters vnto the Archbishops of Caunterbury, requiring his ready ayde therein: in maner followyng.

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An other Letter of the Counsaile sent to the Archbishop of Caunterbury for the abolishing of Images 
Commentary  *  Close

Cattley/Pratt, V, 843: 'This letter of the council is in the Bonner Register, folio 110, and the Westminster, folio 268'.

.

MarginaliaLetters frō the Councel for abolishing of Images, to the Archb. of Cant.AFter our right harty commendations to your good Lordship where now of late in the Kings Maiesties visitations, among other godly Iniunctions commaunded to be generally obserued thorough all partes of this his highnesse Realme, one was set forth for the takyng downe of all such Images as had at any tyme bene abused 

Commentary  *  Close

Injunctions 3 and 28 had spurred iconoclastic attack on images 'abused' and rightly 'used'. Phillips, Reformation of Images, pp. 89-90.

with Pilgrimages, offerings or censings: albeit that this sayd Iniunction hath in many partes of the realme bene quietly obeyed and executed, yet in many other places much stryfe and contention hath risen, and daily riseth, and more and more encreaseth about the execution of the same: some men beyng so superstitious, or rather wilfull, as they would (by theyr good wils) retayne all such Images still, although they haue bene most manifestly abused. And in some places also the Images which by the sayd Iniunctions were taken downe, be now restored and set vp agayne. And almost in euery place is contention for Images, whether they haue bene abused or not. And whiles these men go on both sides contentiously to obtayne theyr myndes, contendyng whether this Image or that Image hath bene offered vnto, kissed, censed, or otherwyse abused, partes haue in some places bene taken, in such sort, as further inconueniēcies be lyke to ensue, if remedy be not found in tyme. Considering therefore, that almost in no place of this realme is any sure quietnes, but where all Images be cleane taken away, and pulled downe alreadye, to the entent that all contention in euery part of the Realme for this matter, may be clearely taken away, and that the liuelye Image of Christ should not contend for the dead Images, which be things not necessary, and without the which the Churches of Christ continued most godly many yeres, we haue thought good to signifie vnto you that his highnesse pleasure, with the aduise & consent of vs the Lord Protector and the rest of the Counsaile is, that immediatly vpon the sight hereof, with as conuenient diligence as you may, you shall not onely geue order that all the Images remayning in the Church or Chappell within your Diocesse be remoued and taken away, but also by your letters signifie vnto the rest of the bishops within your Prouince, this hys hyghnesse pleasure for the lyke order to be geuen by them, and euery of them within theyr seuerall Diocesse 
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On the ground that contention concerning religious images has resulted from the ambiguous wording of the prohibition against 'abused' images in Injunction 3, the Privy council takes the further step of endorsing iconoclastic destruction of all religious images.

. And in the executiō hereof, we require both you and the rest of the sayd Bishops, to vse such foresight as the same may be quietly done, with as good satisfaction of the people as may be. Thus fare your good Lordship hartely well. From Somerset place, the xi. of Febr. 1541 
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I.e., 1548.

.

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Your Lordships assured louing frendes.

Edw. Somerset.
Hen. Arundel.
Anth. Wingfield.
Iohn Russell.
Tho. Semer.
Wil. Paget.

When the Archb. had receiued these letters, he foorthwith directed his precept vnto Boner B. of London, MarginaliaThe Archbyshop writeth to Boner. requiring, and in the kings maiesties name commaundyng him, that with all speede he should as well geue in charge vnto the rest of the bishops within the prouince of Caunterbury, to looke immediately without delay vnto the diligent and carefull execution of the contents of the sayd letter throughout all places of their Dioces: as also that he himselfe should do the lyke within his owne citie & dioces of London. Whereupon he seming then with like outward consent as before, to allow these doyngs, presently (by vertue of the sayd precept) did send out hys Mandatum 

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Latin for 'mandate' or 'order'.

as wellvnto the rest of the bishops, as also agayne vnto the B. of Westminster, in forme followyng.

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¶ The Letter of Edmund Boner, sent with the Archbishops Mandate, to the bishop of Westminster for abolishyng of Images.

MarginaliaBoners letter to the Byshop at Westminster, for abolishing of Images.EDmundus permissione diuina London. Episcopus per illustrissium in Christo principem & dominum nostrum, Dominum Edwardum sextum, Dei gratia, Angliæ, Franciæ, & Hyberniæ Regem, fidei defensorem & in terra Ecclesiæ Anglicanæ & Hybernicæ supremum caput, sufficienter & legitimæ autorisatus Reuerendo in Christo confratri nostro domino Thomæ eadem permissione Westm. Episcopo, salutem & fraternam in Domino charitatem. Literas reuerendissimi in Christo patris & domini D. Thomæ, permissione diuina Cantuar. Archiepiscopi totius Angliæ primatis & Metropolitani, tenorem literarum missarū clarissimorum & prudentissimorum dominorum de priuatis consilijs dicti illustrissimi domini Regis in se continen nuper cum ea qua decuit reuerentia humiliter recepimus exequend. in hæc verba. Thomas permissione diuina Cant. &c. And then makyng a full recitall as well of the Archbishops precept, as also of the Counsels letters aboue specified, he concluded with these wordes. Quocirca nos Edmund. Episc. antedictus, Literis prædictis, pro nostro officio obtemperare, vti decet, summopere cupientes, vestræ fraternitati tam ex parte dicti excellentissimi Domini nostri Regis, ac præfatorum clarissimorum dominorū de priuatis suis consilijs, quàm prædicti Reuer. patris domini Cant. Archiepiscopi, tenore præsentium committimus & mandamus, quatenus attentis & per vos diligenter consideratis Literarum huiusmodi tenoribus, eos in omnibus & per omnia, iuxta vim, formam, & effectum earundem cum omni qua poteris celeritate accommoda, per totam Dioces. vestram West. debite & effectualiter exequi faciatis & procuretis. Datum in ædibus nostris London. vicesimo die Febr. An. Dom. 1548. Et regni dicti illustrissimi domini nostri Regis. Anno secundo.

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MarginaliaAn vniforme order of the Communion.Now by the tyme that these things were thus determined, the learned men which the kyng had appointed (as ye haue heard before) to assemble together for the true and right maner of administring the Sacramente of the body and bloud of Christ, accordyng to the rule of the Scriptures of God, and first vsage of the Primatiue Churche, after theyr long, learned, wyse, and deliberate aduises, dyd finally conclude and agree vppon one godly and vniforme order of receiuing the same, not much differyng from the maner at this present vsed & authorised within this realm and church of England, commonly called the Communion. Which agreement beyng by them exhibited vnto the kyng, and of hym most gladly accepted, was thereupon publikely imprinted 

Commentary  *  Close

The King's Printer, Richard Grafton, published four editions of The order of the communion on 8 March 1548 (STC 16456.5-16458.5). Consisting of an English translation of the part of the Mass in which members of the laity received communion, it was a forerunner of the vernacular service introduced in the Book of Common Prayer (1549). See MacCulloch, Thomas Cranmer, pp. 384-86.

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, and by his maiesties Councell perticularly deuided and sent vnto euery bishop of the realme, requiring and commaundyng them by their letters on the kings Maiesties behalfe, that both they in their own persons, should forthwith haue diligent and carefull respect to the due execution thereof, and also should with all diligēce cause the bookes which they then sent them, to be deliuered vnto euery Parson, Vicar, and Curate within their Dioces, that they likewise might well and sufficiently aduise themselues for the better distribution of the sayd communion, according to the tenour of the sayd booke) agaynst the feast of Easter then next ensuyng, as more fully appeareth by these their letters here followyng.

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¶ Letters Missiue from the Counsaile, to the Bishops of the Realme, concernyng the Communion to be ministred in both kyndes 
Commentary  *  Close

Cattley/Pratt, V, 843: 'These letters missiue from the Council are given at folio 112 of the Bonner Register, and folio 269 of the Westminster'.

.

MarginaliaAnno 1548.AFter our most harty commendatiōs to your Lordship, where in the Parliament late holden at Westminster, it was amongest other things most godly established, MarginaliaThe Communion in both kindes to be ministred.that according to the first institution and vse of the primatiue church, the most holy sacrament of the body and bloud of our Sauior Iesus Christ, shuld be distributed to the people vnder the kyndes of bread & wyne (according to the effect whereof, the kinges maiestie mynding, with the aduice and consent of the Lord Protectors grace & the rest of the Counsaile, to haue the sayd Statute well executed in such sort, or lyke as it is agreeable with the word of God, so the same may be also faithfully and reuerently receiued of his most louing subiects, to their comforts and wealth) hath caused sundry of his maiesties most graue and well learned Prelates, and other learned men in the Scriptures, to assemble themselues for this matter: who after long conference together, haue with deliberate aduise, finally agreed vpon such an order to be vsed in all places of the kings maiesties dominions, in the distribution of the sayd most holy sacrament, as may apeare to you by the booke thereof, which we send here with vnto you. Albeit knowing your

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Lord-
AAAa.iiij.
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