Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageNone
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Edward Seymour

(c. 1500 - 1552) [ODNB]

Soldier; viscount Beauchamp of Hache 1536; earl of Hertford 1537

Lord high admiral 1542; lord great chamberlain 1543

Duke of Somerset 1547; lord protector 1547; lord treasurer 1547; earl marshal 1547; beheaded

Because Edward VI was only young when he came to the throne, his uncle Edward Seymour was assigned as overseer and protector of both the king and the commonwealth. He abolished the Six Articles and brought into the country learned reformers. He replaced some of the unlearned clergy with preachers. 1563, p. 684; 1570, p. 1486; 1576, p. 1259; 1583, p. 1296.

[Back to Top]

Edward Seymour stood against the bishops of Chichester, Norwich, Lincoln, London and others at the consultation at Windsor in the first year of Edward VI's reign. 1570, p. 1551; 1576, p. 1322; 1583, p. 1372.

Seymour granted a pardon to Thomas Dobbe, but Dobbe died in prison before it could reach him. 1563, p. 685; 1570, p. 1486; 1576, p. 1260; 1583, p. 1297.

He was a signatory to a letter from the king and privy council to Nicholas Ridley, directing him to remove and destroy all altars within the churches of his diocese and install communion tables. 1563, p. 727; 1570, pp. 1519-20; 1576, p. 1288; 1583, p. 1331.

Seymour wrote a reply to a letter of Stephen Gardiner objecting to the destruction of images in Portsmouth. 1563, p. 730-31; 1570, pp. 1519-20; 1576, p. 1298; 1583, p. 1331.

Seymour was in regular correspondence with Stephen Gardiner while he was imprisoned in the Fleet. 1563, pp. 730-54; 1570, pp. 1519-25; 1576, pp. 1298-1300; 1583, pp. 1331-50.

Edward Seymour, John Russell, John Dudley and Sir William Petre visited Stephen Gardiner in the Tower at various times to attempt to get him to accept the king's reforms. 1563, p. 766; 1570, p. 1532; 1576, p. 1306; 1583, p. 1356.

After the victorious return of John Dudley, earl of Warwick, from Norfolk, he fell into dispute with Edward Seymour. He and other dissatisfied nobles met together to plan to remove the king from the Lord Protector. John Russell replied, hoping for a reconciliation between the Lord Protector and his adversaries. 1570, pp. 1545-46; 1576, pp. 1317-18; 1583, pp. 1367-68.

[Back to Top]

Edward Seymour wrote to John Russell, describing the conspiracy against him and asking him to bring forces to Windsor. 1570, pp. 1545-46; 1576, p. 1317; 1583, p. 1367.

The king sent a letter to the lord mayor of London, Henry Amcottes; the mayor-elect, Sir Rowland Hill; the aldermen and common council, directing that 1000 troops be mustered to defend the Lord Protector. The lords opposing the Lord Protector sent a letter on the same day directing the mayor and council not to obey any instructions coming from him. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1319; 1583, p. 1369.

[Back to Top]

The lords opposed to the Lord Protector sent Sir Philip Hoby to put their case to the king. As a result, the Lord Protector was imprisoned in Windsor Castle and then taken to the Tower. Shortly after, he was released. 1570, pp. 1548-49; 1576, p. 1320; 1583, p. 1370.

Seymour was imprisoned again in 1551 and charged with treason and felony. He was acquitted of treason, but condemned for felony, intending the death of John Dudley, duke of Northumberland, and others. On 22 January 1552 he was taken to Tower Hill and beheaded. 1570, pp. 1549-50; 1576, p. 1321; 1583, p. 1371.

[Back to Top]

Foxe compares the story of Edward Seymour with that of Humphrey of Lancaster, dealing with his enemy Bishop Beaufort. 1563, pp. 882-84; 1570, p. 1551; 1576, p. 1322; 1583, p. 1372.

Edward Seymour is given as an example of one wrongly accused and judged. 1570, p. 1360; 1576, p. 1161; 1583, p. 1189.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Edward VI

(1537 - 1553) [ODNB]

King of England and Ireland (1547 - 53); Henry VIII's only son

The young Prince Edward wrote letters in Latin to Thomas Cranmer, his godfather. 1570, p. 1564; 1576, p. 1334; 1583, p. 1395.

Edward VI agreed with Sir John Cheke that clemency should be shown towards heretics and was opposed to the burning of Joan Bocher. Cranmer had great difficulty in getting Edward to sign her death warrant. 1563, p. 884; 1570, p. 1484; 1576, p. 1258; 1583, p. 1295.

Cranmer praised the learning and wisdom of Edward VI to his tutor, Richard Coxe. 1563, p. 884; 1570, p. 1484; 1576, p. 1258; 1583, p. 1295.

Jerome Cardan gave written testimony of Edward VI's knowledge of the liberal sciences. 1563, p. 885; 1570, p. 1485; 1576, p. 1259; 1583, p. 1296.

Charles V requested of Edward VI that his cousin Mary Tudor be allowed to have the mass said in her house. The request was denied, in spite of the strong urgings of Thomas Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley. 1563, p. 884; 1570, p. 1484; 1576, p. 1258; 1583, p. 1295.

Edward issued a set of injunctions to further the reformation of the church in the realm. He called a parliament to repeal earlier statutes relating to religion, including the Six Articles. 1563, pp. 685-91; 1570, pp. 1486-90; 1576, pp. 1260-63; 1583, pp. 1297-1301.

Having knowledge of rebellions stirring in the realm and of slackness in religious reform in the city of London, Edward called Edmund Bonner to come before his council. 1570, p. 1495; 1576, p. 1267; 1583, p. 1304.

Edward replied to the articles raised by the rebels of Devonshire. 1570, pp. 1497-99; 1576, pp. 1268-70; 1583, pp. 1305-07.

The king and privy council sent out letters to bishops and clergy in late 1549 and 1550, directing that books of Latin service be withdrawn, that altars be removed and communion tables installed. 1563, pp. 726-28; 1570, pp. 1519-21; 1576, pp. 1288-90; 1583, pp. 1330-31.

Edward wrote letters to his sister, Lady Mary, urging her to obey the new laws concerning religion, and she replied. 1576, pp. 1290-96; 1583, pp. 1333-39.

He sent his own councillors to Mary after her servants, Rochester, Englefield and Waldegrave, had failed to prevent masses being said in her household. 1576, pp. 1296-97; 1583, pp. 1338-39.

King Edward said a private prayer on his deathbed which was overheard by his physician, George Owen. In his will, Edward excluded his sister Mary from the succession because of her religious views. 1563, p. 900; 1570, p. 1565; 1576, p. 1335; 1583, p. 1395.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
James Mourton

One of the priests associated with the Western Rising in 1549

James Mourton was one of the priests said to have been the chief inspirers of the rebellion and who were later executed. 1570, p. 1496; 1576, p. 1268; 1583, p. 1305.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
James Rosogan

One of the leaders of the Western Rising in 1549

James Rosogan is mentioned as one of the Devonshire men's chief captains. 1570, p. 1496; 1576, p. 1268; 1583, p. 1305.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Barrow

One of the priests associated with the Western Rising in 1549

John Barrow was one of the priests said to have been the chief inspirers of the rebellion and who were later executed. 1570, p. 1496; 1576, p. 1268; 1583, p. 1305.

He was captured and executed with other rebel leaders in 1549. 1570, p. 1499; 1576, p. 1271; 1583, p. 1308.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Payne

One of the leaders of the Western Rising in 1549

John Payne is mentioned as one of the Devonshire men's chief captains. 1570, p. 1496; 1576, p. 1268; 1583, p. 1305.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Rosogan

One of the leaders of the Western Rising in 1549

John Rosogan is mentioned as one of the Devonshire men's chief captains. 1570, p. 1496; 1576, p. 1268; 1583, p. 1305.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Soleman

One of the leaders of the Western Rising in 1549

John Soleman is mentioned as one of the Devonshire men's chief captains. 1570, p. 1496; 1576, p. 1268; 1583, p. 1305.

He was captured and executed with other rebel leaders in 1549. 1570, p. 1499; 1576, p. 1271; 1583, p. 1308.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Tompson

One of the priests associated with the Western Rising in 1549

John Tompson was one of the priests said to have been the chief inspirers of the rebellion and who were later executed. 1570, p. 1496; 1576, p. 1268; 1583, p. 1305.

He was captured and executed with other rebel leaders in 1549. 1570, p. 1499; 1576, p. 1271; 1583, p. 1308.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Wolcoke

One of the priests associated with the Western Rising in 1549

John Wolcoke was one of the priests said to have been the chief inspirers of the rebellion and who were later executed. 1570, p. 1496; 1576, p. 1268; 1583, p. 1305.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Reginald Pole

(1500 - 1558) [ODNB]

BA Oxford 1515; dean of Exeter (1527 - 37); cardinal 1536; legate 1537

Archbishop of Canterbury (1555 - 58)

In a sermon delivered by Cuthbert Tunstall, Reginald Pole was described as a traitor, sent by the pope to provoke war against England. 1570, p. 1210; 1576, p. 1036; 1583, p. 1063.

Reginald Pole fled to Rome and was created cardinal. While in Rome, he was sent a letter from Bishops Stokesley and Tunstall, urging him to give up his support of the supremacy of the pope. 1563, pp. 613-20; 1570, pp. 1212-16; 1576, pp. 1037-42; 1583, pp. 1065-68.

Cardinal Pole and Paolo Giovio both wrote adversely of Anne Boleyn. 1570, p. 1233; 1576, p. 1056; 1583, p. 1083.

Paul III sent Cardinal Pole to the French king to stir him to war against Henry VIII. 1570, p. 1239; 1576, p. 1061; 1583, p. 1087.

In a letter to Henry VIII, Philip Melancthon complained of Cardinals Contarini, Sadoleto and Pole working to cover up the corruption in Rome. 1570, p. 1341; 1576, p. 1145; 1583, p. 1173.

Pole urged Adam Damplip to stay in Rome to deliver lectures, but he refused. Pole gave him a French crown when he left. 1563, p. 656; 1570, p. 1400; 1576, p. 1194; 1583, p. 1223.

The Western rebels in 1549, especially their priests, called for Pole's restoration. 1570, p. 1496; 1576, p. 1268; 1583, p. 1305.

In a letter to the Lord Protector, Stephen Gardiner referred to Pole as his old master. 1563, p. 741.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richard Benet

One of the priests associated with the Western Rising in 1549

Richard Benet was one of the priests said to have been the chief inspirers of the rebellion and who were later executed. 1570, p. 1496; 1576, p. 1268; 1583, p. 1305.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Robert Bochin

One of the priests associated with the Western Rising in 1549

Robert Bochin was one of the priests said to have been the chief inspirers of the rebellion and who were later executed. 1570, p. 1496; 1576, p. 1268; 1583, p. 1305.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Roger Barrett

One of the priests associated with the Western Rising in 1549

Roger Barrett was one of the priests said to have been the chief inspirers of the rebellion and who were later executed. 1570, p. 1496; 1576, p. 1268; 1583, p. 1305.

He was captured and executed with other rebel leaders in 1549. 1570, p. 1499; 1576, p. 1271; 1583, p. 1308.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Humphrey Arundell

(1512/3 - 1550) [ODNB]

of Helland, Cornwall; Catholic landowner; leader of the Western Rising of 1549; captured and tried for treason, hanged at Tyburn

Humphrey Arundell was one of the Devonshire men's chief captains. 1563, p. 886; 1570, p. 1496; 1576, p. 1268; 1583, p. 1305.

Humphrey Arundell and Henry Bray requested safe conduct to put their grievances to the king. 1563, p. 886.

Arundell was captured and executed with other rebel leaders. 1570, p. 1499; 1576, p. 1271; 1583, p. 1308.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Underhill

One of the leaders of the Western Rising in 1549

Thomas Underhill is mentioned as one of the Devonshire men's chief captains. 1570, p. 1496; 1576, p. 1268; 1583, p. 1305.

He was captured and executed with other rebel leaders. 1570, p. 1496; 1576, p. 1268; 1583, p. 1305.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Alsa

Vicar of Gulval; executed in 1549

William Alsa was one of the priests said to have been the chief inspirers of the rebellion and who were later executed. 1570, p. 1496; 1576, p. 1268; 1583, p. 1305.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Segar

One of the leaders of the Western Rising in 1549

William Segar is mentioned as one of the Devonshire men's chief captains. 1570, p. 1496; 1576, p. 1268; 1583, p. 1305.

He was captured and executed with other rebel leaders in 1549. 1570, p. 1499; 1576, p. 1271; 1583, p. 1308.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Exeter
NGR: SX 920 925

A city and county of itself, locally in the hundred of Wanford, county of Devon, of which it is the chief town. 10 miles north-north-west from Exmouth, 44 miles north-east from Plymouth. The city comprises 17 parishes, two chapelries, and the extra-parochial precinct of the cathedral; all in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Exeter, of which the town is the seat. 14 of the livings are discharged rectories; St John is a rectory not in charge; St David and St Sidwell are perpetual curacies.

[Back to Top]

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

[Back to Top]
1329 [1305]

K. Ed. 6. The commotion of Deuonshire men against the K. with their articles. The kings aunswere to the same.

MarginaliaThe rebels in Cornewall and Deuonshyre.And thus hauing brought B. Boner home to his own house, there to leaue hym a while to take his ease in hys owne lodging, til we returne to him againe, we wil in the meane tyme make a little intercourse into Cornewall and Deuonshire to discourse some part of the disordered and and disloyall doings of those men against their so meeke and excellent a prince, hauing no cause ministred therunto: yea hauyng cause rather to yeld prayse and thanks to the lord for such a quiet and peaceable prince in his mercy geuē vnto them. But such is the condition of vnquiet natures, that they cannot skill of peace. And where due discretiō lacketh, there lewd disposed persons cannot tel when they be wel, againe some be so crooked and so peruersly geuen, that the more curteously they be intreated, the worse they are: and when by honest diligence they list not to get their liuyng, by publike disturbance of common weales they thinke to thriue. And so seemed it to fare with this seditious people of Cornewall and Deuonshire, who hauyng so good and vertuous a kyng, that if they should haue sought hym as Diogenes (they say) did seeke for a man with a candle, a meeker and better soueraigne they could not haue found, a crueller they well deserued: yet were they not with him contented, but contrary to al order, reason, nature and loialtie, aduaunced themselues in a rebellious conspiracie against hym, and agaynst his proceedings through the pernitious instigation, first (as it seemeth) of certaine popish priestes, MarginaliaPopishe priestes first stirrers of this rebellion. who grudgyng and disdainyng agaynst the Iniunctions and godly order of reformation set forward by the king, and specially mourning to see their olde popishe Church of Rome to decay, ceased not by all sinister & subtile meanes, first vnder Gods name and the kings, & vnder coulour of religion to perswade the people, then to gather sides and to assemble in companies, to gather Captaines, and at last to brast out in ranke rebellion. MarginaliaAll wickednes first beginneth vnder faire pretenses. Neither lacked there amongst the lay sort some as seditiously disposed as they to mischiefe and madnesse, as well Gentlemen as other.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaCaptaines of the rebelles in Deuonshyre.Of whom the chiefe Gentlemen Captains were, Humfrey Arundell Esquire, gouernour of the Mount, Iames Rosogan, Iohn Rosogan, Iohn Payne, Thomas Vnderhil, Iohn Soleman, William Segar. Of priests which were principall stirrers, and some of them gouernours of the Camps, and after executed, were to the number of 8. whose names were Rob. Bochim, Iohn Tompson, Roger Barret, Iohn Wolcoke, Wil. Asa, Iames Mourton, Iohn Barow, Rich. Benet, besides a multitude of other popish priests, MarginaliaPriestes rebelles and traytors against the king. which to the same faction were adioyned. The number of the whole rebellion, speakyng with þt lest mounted litle lesse then to the summe of ten thousand stout traitors.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaDiuers Commotions in K. Edwardes tyme suppressed.These hearing first of the commotions which began about the same tyme in other parts to broyle, as in Oxfordshire, Yorkeshire, and especially in Northfolke & Suffolk, began to take therin some courage, hoping that they shold haue well fortified the same with quarell. But afterward perceiuyng how the mischieuous mutterings and enterprises of their conspiracie did sodenly fayle, eyther beyng preuēted by tyme, or repressed by power, or that their cause beyng but onely about pluckyng down of enclosures and enlarging of commons, was deuided from theirs, so that eyther they would not or could not ioyne their ayde together, then began they againe to quayle, and their courage to debate. Notwithstanding, for so much as they had gone so far, that they thought there was no shrinking back, they fell to new deuises and inuentions, for the best furtherance of their desperate purposes.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe citye of Exceter inuaded by the rebells.Their first intent was, after they had spoiled their own countrey most miserably, to inuade the Citie of Exceter, & so consequently all other parts of the realme. But first for Exceter they gaped, the gates whereof twise they burned, but gayned nothing sauyng onely gunshot, whereof they lacked no plenty. Beyng put from Exceter, they fel on spoiling and robbing, where or whatsoeuer they might catche. At length laying their traiterous heds together, they consulted vpon certain articles to be sent vp. MarginaliaDiuersitye of wittes amongest the rebells.But herein such diuersitie of heds and wits was amongst them, that for euery kind of braine there was one manner of Article: so þt neither appeared any consent in their diuersitie, nor yet any constancie in their agrement. Some seemed more tolerable. Other altogether vnreasonable. Some would haue no Iustice. Some would haue no state of gentlemen. The priests euer harped of one string to ring in the Bishop of Rome into England agayne, and to hallow home Cardinall Poole theyr countrieman.

[Back to Top]

After much ado and little to the purpose, at last a fewe sory Articles were agreed vppon to be directed vnto the kyng, with the names of certayne set thereunto, the copy whereof here ensueth.

¶ The Articles of the Commons of Deuonshire and Cornewall sent to the king, with answer afterward followyng vnto the same.

MarginaliaThe Articles of Deuonshyre men, to the king and his Counsaile. Marginalia1. Sacrament of BaptismeFIrst, forasmuch as man except he be borne of water and the holy Ghost, cannot enter into the kingdom of God, and forasmuch as the gates of heauen be not opened without this blessed Sacrament of Baptisme, therefore we will that our Curates shall minister this Sacrament at all tymes of neede, as well in the weeke dayes, as on the holy dayes.

[Back to Top]

Marginalia2. Confirmation.Item, we will haue our children confirmed of the Bish. whensoeuer we shal within the Dioces resort vnto him.

Marginalia3. Consecration of the Lords body.Item, forasmuch as we constantly beleeue that after the Priest hath spoken the wordes of consecration beyng at Masses, there celebrating and consecrating the same, there is very really the body & bloud of our sauiour Iesu Christ God and man, and that no substance of bread and wine remaineth after, but the very selfe same body that was borne of the virgin Mary, and was geuen vpon the Crosse for our redemption: therfore we wil haue masse celebrated as it hath bene in tymes past, without any man communicatyng with the Priestes, forasmuch as many rudely presuming vnworthily to receiue the same, put no difference betwene the Lordes body and other kind of meat, some saying that it is bread before and after, some saying that it is profitable to no man except he receiue it, with many other abused termes.

[Back to Top]

Marginalia4. Reseruation of the Lords body consecrated.Item, we will haue in our churches reseruation.

Marginalia5. Holy bread and holywater.Item, we will haue holy bread and holy water in the remembrance of Christes precious body and bloud.

Item, we will that our Priestes shall sing or say with an audible voyce, Gods seruice in the Quier of the parish churches, & not Gods seruice to bee set foorth like a Christmasse play.

Marginalia6. The single lyfe of Priestes.Item, forasmuch as Priests be men dedicated to God, for ministring and celebrating the blessed sacraments and preachyng of Gods word, we will that they shal liue chast without Mariage, as S. Paule dyd, beyng the elect and chosen vessell of God, saying vnto all honest priests, be ye followers of me.

[Back to Top]

Marginalia7. The 6. articles to be renued.Item, we will that the vj. Articles, which our soueraigne Lord king Henry the 8. set forth in his latter days, shall be vsed and so taken as they were at that tyme.

Item, we pray God saue king Edward, for we be his, both body and goods.

¶ A Message sent by the Kings Maiestie, to certayne of his people assembled in Deuonshire.

Marginalia

The aunswere of the K. to the Articles of the rebels in Deuonshire.

Anno 15.49

ALthough knowledge hath bene geuen to vs & our derest vncle Edward Duke of Somerset, Gouernour of our person, and Protector of all our Realmes, dominions and subiects, and to the rest of our priuy Counsaile, of diuers assemblies made by you, which ought of duetie to be our louing subiects, against al order, law, & otherwise thē euer any louing or kind subiectes hath attempted agaynst their natural & liege soueraign lord: yet we haue thought it meete at this very first tyme not to condemne or reiect you as we might iustly do, but to vse you as our subiects, thinking that þe deuil hath not that power in you, to make you of naturall borne Englishmen, so sodainly become enemies to your owne natiue countrey, or of our subiects, to make you traitors, or vnder pretence to relieue your selues, to destroy your selues, your wiues, children, lands, houses, and all other commodities of this your lyfe. This we say, we trust that although ye be by ignorance seduced, ye will not be vppon knowledge obstinate. And though some amongst you (as euer there is some cockle amongest good corne) forget God, neglect their prince, esteeme not þe state of the Realme, but as careles desperate men delite in sedition, tumult, and warres: yet ncuertheles the greater part of you will heare the voyce of vs your natural prince and will by wisedome and counsell be warned, and cease your euils in the beginning, whose endes will be euen by almighty gods order, your owne destruction. Wherefore, as to you our subiects by ignorance seduced, we speake & be content to vse our princely authority like a father to his children for this tyme, to admonish you of your faults, not to punish them, to put you in remembrance of your duties not to auenge your forgetfulnes.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaVnlawfull assemblyes.First, your disorder to rise in multitudes, to assemble your selues against other our louyng subiectes, to araye your selues to the warre, who amongst you al can answer for þe same to almighty God, charging you to obey vs in al things? Or how can any English good hart aunswer vs, our lawes, and the rest of our very louyng & faithfull sub-

[Back to Top]
iects,
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield