Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageNone
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Edmund Sheffield

(1521 - 1549) [ODNB]

1st Baron Sheffield (1547 - 49); killed confronting Kett's rising in Norfolk

In the fight with the Norfolk rebels for the city of Norwich, few were killed, and the only one of consequence slain was Lord Sheffield. 1570, p. 1500; 1576, p. 1271; 1583, p. 1308.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Henry Bray

Mayor of Bodmin 1549; executed

Humphrey Arundell and Henry Bray requested safe conduct to put their grievances to the king. 1563, p. 886.

Henry Bray was captured and executed with other leaders of the Western Rising in 1549. 1570, p. 1499; 1576, p. 1271; 1583, p. 1308.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Henry Lee

Mayor of Torrington 1549; executed

Henry Lee was captured and executed with other rebel leaders in 1549. 1570, p. 1499; 1576, p. 1271; 1583, p. 1308.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Homes

Homes was a yeoman of the guard who mistreated Rowland Taylor when escorting him to his execution. 1563, p. 1077; 1570, p. 1701; 1576, p. 1452; 1583, p. 1525.

When Taylor attempted to speak to the crowd at his execution, Homes struck Taylor on the head. 1563, p. 1079; 1570, p. 1702; 1576, p. 1453; 1583, p. 1526.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Dudley

(1504 - 1553) [ODNB]

Viscount Lisle (1542 - 47); earl of Warwick (1547 - 51), lord great chamberlain

Duke of Northumberland 1551; lord president of the privy council (1550 - 52); led support for Lady Jane Grey; executed

Dudley, Lord Lisle, was one of the questioners at the second examination of Anne Askew in 1546. 1563, p. 683; 1570, p. 1417; 1576, p. 1208; 1583, p. 1237.

He was a signatory to a letter from the council to Nicholas Ridley, directing him to remove and destroy all altars within the churches of his diocese and install communion tables. 1563, p. 727; 1570, pp. 1519-20; 1576, p. 1288; 1583, p. 1331.

Dudley was a signatory to a letter of commission against Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 777.

Following the taking of the city of Norwich by the Norfolk rebels, John Dudley, earl of Warwick, was sent with an army. The rebels were defeated and their leaders executed. 1570, p. 1500; 1576, p. 1271; 1583, p. 1308.

After Dudley's return from Norfolk, he fell into dispute with Edward Seymour. He and other dissatisfied nobles met together to plan to remove the king from the Lord Protector. 1570, p. 1545; 1576, p. 1317; 1583, p. 1367.

Dudley was one of the signatories to the proclamation against Edward Seymour calling for his removal. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

He was one of the signatories to the letter to the lord mayor and common council of London from the lords opposing Edward Seymour. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1319; 1583, p. 1369.

Seymour was imprisoned for the second time in 1551 and charged with treason and felony. He was acquitted of treason, but condemned for felony, intending the death of John Dudley, duke of Northumberland, and others. 1570, p. 1549; 1576, p. 1321; 1583, p. 1371.

After Stephen Gardiner had been in the Tower for nearly a year, Sir William Paulet and Sir William Petre, the earl of Warwick and Sir William Herbert delivered the king's letters to him. 1563, pp. 761-62; 1570, pp. 1529-30; 1576, p. 1304; 1583, p. 1354.

Edward Seymour, John Russell, John Dudley and Sir William Petre visited Stephen Gardiner in the Tower at various times to attempt to get him to accept the king's reforms. 1563, pp. 766; 1570, p. 1532; 1576, p. 1306; 1583, p. 1356.

Dudley was a deponent in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, pp. 822-24

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Stevenson

of Seamer, Yorks; neighbour to Thomas Dale and nephew of William Ombier; rebel 1549; executed

John Stevenson introduced Dale to Ombier and was one of the ringleaders of a rebellion that began in Seamer and spread through the surrounding area. The rebels were offered a pardon, but refused. He was captured and executed. 1570, pp. 1500-01; 1576, pp. 1271-72; 1583, pp. 1308-09.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Mary Queen of Scots

(1542 - 1587) [ODNB]

Queen of Scots (1542 - 67)

Married (1) François, dauphin of France in 1558; queen of France (1559 - 60); married (2) Henry Lord Darnley in 1565; married (3) the earl of Bothwell in 1567; forced to abdicate; imprisoned in England; beheaded

Mary was promised by the Scots to Henry VIII as a wife to Edward VI, which promise was later broken. 1570, p. 1499; 1576, p. 1271; 1583, p. 1308.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Robert Kett (Ket)

(c. 1492 - 1549) [ODNB]

Wealthy tanner of Wymondham in Norfolk; led a rebellion in 1549; captured, found guilty of treason; executed at Norwich; hanged from the walls of Norwich castle

His brother William (d. 1549) was also a leader of the rebellion. Captured and tried with Robert; hanged from the steeple of Wymondham church

They are mentioned by Foxe: 1570, p. 1500; 1576, p. 1271; 1583, p. 1308.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Dale

Parish clerk of Seamer, Yorks; rebel 1549; executed

Thomas Dale was one of the ringleaders of a rebellion that began in Seamer and spread through the surrounding area. The rebels were offered a pardon, but refused. He was captured and executed. 1570, pp. 1500-01; 1576, pp. 1271-72; 1583, pp. 1308-09.

William Ombler, Thomas Dale, Henry Barton and Robert Dale took Matthew White, Clopton, Savage and Berry, murdered them, stripped their bodies and left them in a field. 1570, p. 1500; 1576, p. 1272; 1583, p. 1309.

Thomas Dale was executed with other rebel leaders at York. 1570, p. 1501; 1576, p. 1272; 1583, p. 1309.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Grey

(1508/9 - 1562) [ODNB]

13th Baron Grey of Wilton; lieutenant of Hammes in the marches of Calais in 1530; part of the protestant faction

Lord Grey, Sir George Carew and Sir Richard Grenville were the members of the council of Calais who were more favourable to the accused heretics of the town. For a time they were out of favour with the king, but later were in greater favour than before. 1563, p. 668; 1570, p. 1406; 1576, p. 1199; 1583, p. 1228.

[Back to Top]

Lord Grey was appointed to assist Sir John Russell in the west at the time of the Western Rising. 1570, p. 1499; 1576, p. 1271; 1583, p. 1307.

On his way to Devon to deal with the rebels there, Lord Grey disbanded rebels in Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire, capturing and executing some. 1570, p. 1499; 1576, p. 1271; 1583, p. 1308.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Ombler

Yeoman of Easthellerton, Yorks; rebel 1549; executed

Ombler was one of the ringleaders of a rebellion that began in Seamer and spread through the surrounding area. He was offered a pardon, but he encouraged the others to refuse. He was captured and executed at York. 1570, pp. 1500-01; 1576, pp. 1271-72; 1583, pp. 1308-09.

William Ombler, Thomas Dale, Henry Barton and Robert Dale took Matthew White, Clopton, Savage and Berry, murdered them, stripped their bodies and left them in a field. 1570, p. 1500; 1576, p. 1272; 1583, p. 1309.

Ombler was spotted and captured by John Word the younger, James Aslaby, Rafe Twinge and Thomas Constable, who took him to York to be tried. 1570, p. 1501; 1576, p. 1272; 1583, p. 1309.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Parr

(1513 - 1571) [ODNB]

Brother of Katherine; courtier; earl of Essex (1543 - 53); privy councillor (1545 - 48)

Marquess of Northampton (1547 - 53, 1559 - 71)

William Parr, earl of Essex, was one of the questioners at the second examination of Anne Askew in 1546. 1563, p. 683; 1570, p. 1417; 1576, p. 1208; 1583, p. 1237.

Northampton was sent to quell the rebellion in Norfolk in 1549, with instructions to keep his troops out of Norwich. He disobeyed the instructions, and the rebels took Norwich. 1570, p. 1500; 1576, p. 1271; 1583, p. 1308.

Northampton was one of the signatories to the proclamation against Edward Seymour calling for his removal. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

He was one of the signatories to the letter to the lord mayor and common council of London from the lords opposing Edward Seymour. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1319; 1583, p. 1369.

Parr was a deponent in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 812

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Bristol
Bristoll, Brystoll, Bristow, Bristowe
NGR: ST 590 730

A city and county of itself, between the counties of Gloucester and Somerset. 34 miles south-west by south from Gloucester, 12 miles north-west from Bath. Bristol is the seat of a diocese, established in 1542. The city comprises the parishes of All Saints, St. Augustine, Christ Church, St. Owen, St. John Baptist, St. Leonard, St. Mary le Port, St. Mary Redcliffe, St. Michael, St. Nicholas, St. Peter, St. Werburgh, St. Stephen and St. Thomas. Also the Temple parish, and parts of St. James, St. Paul, St. Philip and St. Jacob. All are within the peculiar jurisdiction of the bishop. Christ Church, St. John Baptist, St. Mary le Port, St. Michael, St. Peter, St. Stephen and St. Werburgh are discharged rectories. St. Leonard, St. Mary Redcliffe, St. Nicholas, The Temple, St. Philip and St. Jacob are discharged vicarages. St. James and St. Thomas are perpetual curacies, the latter annexed to the vicarage of Bedminster, Archdeaconry of Bath, Diocese of Bath and Wells.

[Back to Top]

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

[Back to Top]
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
East Heslerton

North Yorkshire

OS grid ref: SE 925 765

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Mus [Mussium]

Gard, France

Coordinates: 43° 44' 0" N, 4° 12' 0" E

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Musselburgh [Muscleborough]

East Lothian, Scotland

OS grid ref: NT 355 735

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Norwich
NGR: TG 230 070

A city and county of itself, locally in the hundred of Humbleyard, county of Norfolk, of which it is the capital. 108 miles north-east by north from London. The city comprises 33 parishes, and the liberty of the city a further four. Of these 37, three are rectories, 12 are discharged rectories, three are vicarages, one is a discharged vicarage, and 18 are perpetual curacies. St Andrew, St Helen, St James, St Paul and Lakenham are within the peculiar jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter; the rest are in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Norwich, of which the city is the seat.

[Back to Top]

Further information:

Andrews church (now St Andrews Hall) is at the junction of St Andrews Street and Elm Hill.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

[Back to Top]
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Seamer [Semer]

nr Scarborough, North Yorkshire

OS grid ref: TA 015 835

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Wintringham

[Wintringeham]

near Malton, North Yorkshire

OS grid ref: SE 885 735

1332 [blank]

King Edward 6. Commotions of Deuonshire, Yorkeshire, and Northfolke in king Edwardes tyme.

ouerthrowen.

MarginaliaThe great goodnes of God in the victory against the rebells.In the which victorie a great woorke of Gods mightye power vndoubtedly did appeare. For althoughe the number of the rebels did surmounte in great quantitie, the power and strength of the Lorde priuie Seale, and theyr stomackes were so fiercely set vpon al desperate aduentures, and though the power of Sir W .Harbert (being the same time at Bristow) was not yet presently come, which shuld haue ioyned with the Lorde priuie Seale: yet all thys notwithstanding, the goodnes of the Lorde so wrought on the kings behalfe, more then any industry of man (which in al respects in handling that matter was very raw and farre behinde) that the victorie fell to the kings parte, vnder the valiant guiding of the aforesayd L. priuie Seale: MarginaliaThe laudable seruice of the L. priuy Seale. so that the popishe rebels not onely lost the fielde, but a great parte of them also lost their liues, lying there slain miserably in the chase to the compasse of 2. miles space. Where also were taken and apprehended the chiefetaines and ringleaders of that mischieuous daunce: wherof the principal were Humfrey Arundel, Berry, Thomas Vnderhil, Iohn Soleman, W. Segar, Tempson, and Barret two Priestes, Henrye Bray and Henrye Lee, two Maiors, wyth diuers other mo aboue specified: al which accordingly afterwarde were executed.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaFalse trust of the Deuonshire men in their Popishe Idolls disapointed.These rebels to make their part more sure by the helpe and presence of their consecrated God and maker, brought with them into the battaile the Pixe vnder his Canapie, and in steed of an aultar, where he was hanging before, set him nowe riding in a Carte. MarginaliaThe Sacrament in the pix brought to the bataile in a Carte. Neither was there lacking masses, crosses, banners, candlesticks, with holy breade also, and holy water plentie, to defend them from deuils and all aduersarye power, whyche in the ende neyther coulde helpe theyr frends, nor yet could saue them selues from the handes of theyr ennemies, but eftsoones both the consecrated God and al the trumperie about him, was taken in the carte, and there lay all in the dust, leauinge to them a notable lesson of better experience howe to put their confidence heereafter in no suche vaine Idolles, but onely in the true liuing God, and immortall maker, to be serued according to hys prescribed worde, and that onely in the faithe of hys soune, and not after theyr owne dreaming fantasies.

[Back to Top]

The storie whereof putteth mee also in remembraunce of an other like popish field, (called Muscleborough field MarginaliaMuscleborough field in Scotlād.) fought in Scotland the yeare before this, where the Scots likewise encamping them selues against the Lorde Protectour, and the kynges power sente into Scotlande, did in semblable wise bringe with them to the battaile the consecrated gods of their aultares, wyth Masses, Crosses, banners, and all their Popish stuffe of Idolatrie, hauing great affiaunce, by vertue thereof to haue a great day against the English armie, as in deede to mannes iudgement myghte seeme not vnlike. For the number of the Scottes armye so farre exceeded ours, and they wer so appoynted with theyr pikes in the first fronte against our horsemen (which gaue the first onset) that our men were faine to recule, not without the losse of diuers Gentlemen. MarginaliaGods mighty arme fighting with K. Edward in Scotland.Notwythstanding, the mighty arme of the Lorde so turned the victorie, that the Scottes in the ende with all their Masses, Pixes, and Idolatrous trinkets were put to the woorse. MarginaliaThe vayne trust of the Scottes in their masses & sacramēt of the altar. Of whome in that fielde were slayne betweene 13. and 14. thousande, and not passing an hundreth Englishe men. The cause of thys was the promise of the Scots made before to king Henry, for the marriage of the young Scottish Queene to Kynge Edwarde, which promise the sayd Scots afterward brake and paide thereafter.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaA notable victory through the Lordes power of K. Edward in Scotlād.In the whiche victorie this is also to be noted, that the same day and houre when the images were burned openly in London, the Scots were put to flighte in Muscleborough, as is credibly noted in Recordes.

MarginaliaA sturre in Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire.During this hurley burley amongst the popish rebels in Cornwall and Deuonshire, the like commotion at the same time, by suche like popish priestes, as Homes and his felowes, began to gender in the parties of Oxforde & Buckingham, but that was soone appeased by the Lord Gray, who comming downe that waye into Deuonshire, chased the rebelles to their houses. Of whom 200. wer taken, and a dosen of the ringleaders deliuered vnto him, wherof certaine were after executed.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaRebellion in Northfolke.In Northfolke and parties thereabout, all be it the originall of theyr tumultuous sturring was not for the like cause, yet the obstinate hearts of that vnruly multitude semed no lesse bent vpon mischief, to disturbe publike peace, which was also in the moneth of Iuly, the yere abouesayd. For repression of whych rebellion, first was sent the Lorde Marques of Northampton, MarginaliaInstructiōs geuē to the L. Marques wyth speciall instruction to auoide the fighte, and so by order was appoynted wyth a number of horse to keepe the fielde and passages, whereby they being stopped from vittaile, might the sooner be brou-ght to acknowledge their follie, and to seeke theyr pardon. Who then following other pollicie, then by order was geuen, came and pinned him selfe wythin the Citie of Norwiche, which afterwarde they were faine to abandone, the rebelles pressing vppon the Citie so on euery side, that at length they obtained the same. Neuerthelesse, in all that conflicte there was but an hundreth on both sides slayne, and otherwise no great losse, MarginaliaThe L. Shefield slaine at Norwich.but onely the losse of the Lord Sheefielde.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe rebells of Northfolke suppressed.Then was sente downe againste them the Earle of Warwike wyth sufficient force and number of souldiours, besides the conuey of 2000. Almaines, by whome the rude and confused rabble was there ouerthrowne and slaine, to the number, as is supposed at the least of 4000. And in fine, both the Keltes chiefe sturrers and authours of that commotion were taken and put to execution, and one of them hanged vp in chaines.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaAn other rebellion or tumult beganne in Yorkeshire.Moreouer, besides these inordinate vprores and insurrections aboue mentioned, about the latter ende of the said moneth of Iulye, the same yeare, which was 1549. an other like sturre or Commotion beganne at Semer, in the Northriding of Yorkeshire, and continued in the Easteriding of the same, and there ended. MarginaliaThe chiefe stirrers of this rebellion in the North.The principal doers and raisers vp whereof was one W. Ombler of Eastheslerton yeoman, and Tho. Dale parishclarke of Semer, with one Steuenson of Semer, neighbour to Dale, and nephewe to Ombler. Which Steuenson was a meane or messenger betwene the said Ombler and Dale, being afore not acquainted togither, and dwelling seuen miles one from the other. Who at last by the trauaile of the said Steuenson and their owne euil dispositions inclined to vngratiousnesse & mischiefe, knowing before one the others mind by secrete conference, were brought to talke together on S. Iames day. An. 1549.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe causes mouing the Yorkeshire men to rebellion.The causes moouing them to raise thys rebellion, were these, first and principallye theyr traiterous heartes grudging at the kings most godly proceedings, in aduauncinge and refourming the true honour of God, and his religion. An other cause also was, for trusting to a blinde and a fantasticall prophecie, wherewith they were seduced, thinking the same prophecie shoulde shortly come to passe, by hearing the rebellions of Northfolke, of Deuonshire, and other places.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaA blinde prophesie amongest the Northeren men.The tenor of which prophisie & purpose, together of the traytors was, that there should no king reigne in Englād the noblemen and gentlemen to be destroyed: and þe realm to be ruled by 4. gouernors, to be elected & appointed by þe commons holding a parlament in cōmotion, to begin at þe south, and north seas of England. &c. supposing that thys their rebellion in the North, and the other of the Deuonshire men in the west, meeting (as they intended) at one place, to be the meane how to compasse this their trayterous deuilish deuise.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaThe deuise of the rebels how to compasse their purpose.And therefore laying their studyes together, how they mighte finde out more companye to ioyne with them in that detestable purpose, and so set forward to sturre, thys deuise they framed, to sturre in two places, the one distant seuen myles from the other, and at the first rush to kill and destroy such gentlemen and men of substaunce about them as were fauourers of the kinges proceedinges, or which would resist them. MarginaliaAnno 1549.But first of all, for the more speedy raysing of men, they deuised to burne Beacons, and therby to bring the people together, as though it were to defend the Sea coastes, and hauing the ignoraunt people assembled, then to poure out theyr poyson: first beginning with þe rudest and poorest sorte suche as they thought were pricked wt pouertie, and were vnwilling to labour, and therefore the more ready to followe the spoyle of rich mens goodes, blowing into their heades, that Gods seruice was layd aside, and newe inuentions neither good nor godly put in place, and so feeding them with fayre promises, to reduce into the Church agayne their olde ignoraunce and Idolatry, thought by that meanes soonest to allure them to the rage & rūne with them in this commotion. MarginaliaFalse lyes forged of Gods true religion. And furthermore to the entent they would geue the more terrour to the gentlemen at their first rising, least they shoulde be resisted, they deuised that some should be murdered in Churches, some in theyr houses, some in seruing the king in commission, & other as they might be caught, and pick quarrels to thē by alteration of seruice on the holy dayes. And thus was the platforme cast of their deuice, according as afterward by their confession at their examinations was testified and remayneth in true recorde.

[Back to Top]

Thus they being together agreed, Ombler and Dale, and other by their secret appoyntment, so laboured the matter in þe parish of Semer, Wintringeham, & þe townes about, that they wer enfected with the poyson of this confederacy, in such sorte, that it was easie to vnderstād wher-

unto
BBBb.ij.
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield