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Edward Montague

(1480s - 1557) [ODNB]

JP Northamptonshire 1523; king's sergeant 1537

Chief justuce of the King's Bench 1539; chief justice of the Common Pleas (1545 - 53)

Edward Montague was a signatory to a letter from the council to Edmund Bonner, instructing that he cease to allow private masses in St Paul's. 1563, pp. 692-93; 1570, p. 1493; 1576, p. 1265; 1583, p. 1302.

Edward Montague was one of the signatories to the proclamation against Edward Seymour calling for his removal. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

After Edmund Bonner was sentenced to prison and deprived of his bishopric, the king appointed Lord Rich, Henry marquess of Dorset, Thomas Goodrich, Lord Wentworth, Sir Anthony Wingfield, Sir William Herbert, Nicholas Wotton, Edward Montague, Sir John Baker, Judge Hales, John Gosnold, John Oliver and Griffith Leyson to examine his documents. They confirmed the sentence against him. 1563, p. 725; 1570, p. 1519; 1576, pp. 1287-88; 1583, p. 1330.

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Edward Seymour

(c. 1500 - 1552) [ODNB]

Soldier; viscount Beauchamp of Hache 1536; earl of Hertford 1537

Lord high admiral 1542; lord great chamberlain 1543

Duke of Somerset 1547; lord protector 1547; lord treasurer 1547; earl marshal 1547; beheaded

Because Edward VI was only young when he came to the throne, his uncle Edward Seymour was assigned as overseer and protector of both the king and the commonwealth. He abolished the Six Articles and brought into the country learned reformers. He replaced some of the unlearned clergy with preachers. 1563, p. 684; 1570, p. 1486; 1576, p. 1259; 1583, p. 1296.

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Edward Seymour stood against the bishops of Chichester, Norwich, Lincoln, London and others at the consultation at Windsor in the first year of Edward VI's reign. 1570, p. 1551; 1576, p. 1322; 1583, p. 1372.

Seymour granted a pardon to Thomas Dobbe, but Dobbe died in prison before it could reach him. 1563, p. 685; 1570, p. 1486; 1576, p. 1260; 1583, p. 1297.

He was a signatory to a letter from the king and privy council to Nicholas Ridley, directing him to remove and destroy all altars within the churches of his diocese and install communion tables. 1563, p. 727; 1570, pp. 1519-20; 1576, p. 1288; 1583, p. 1331.

Seymour wrote a reply to a letter of Stephen Gardiner objecting to the destruction of images in Portsmouth. 1563, p. 730-31; 1570, pp. 1519-20; 1576, p. 1298; 1583, p. 1331.

Seymour was in regular correspondence with Stephen Gardiner while he was imprisoned in the Fleet. 1563, pp. 730-54; 1570, pp. 1519-25; 1576, pp. 1298-1300; 1583, pp. 1331-50.

Edward Seymour, John Russell, John Dudley and Sir William Petre visited Stephen Gardiner in the Tower at various times to attempt to get him to accept the king's reforms. 1563, p. 766; 1570, p. 1532; 1576, p. 1306; 1583, p. 1356.

After the victorious return of John Dudley, earl of Warwick, from Norfolk, he fell into dispute with Edward Seymour. He and other dissatisfied nobles met together to plan to remove the king from the Lord Protector. John Russell replied, hoping for a reconciliation between the Lord Protector and his adversaries. 1570, pp. 1545-46; 1576, pp. 1317-18; 1583, pp. 1367-68.

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Edward Seymour wrote to John Russell, describing the conspiracy against him and asking him to bring forces to Windsor. 1570, pp. 1545-46; 1576, p. 1317; 1583, p. 1367.

The king sent a letter to the lord mayor of London, Henry Amcottes; the mayor-elect, Sir Rowland Hill; the aldermen and common council, directing that 1000 troops be mustered to defend the Lord Protector. The lords opposing the Lord Protector sent a letter on the same day directing the mayor and council not to obey any instructions coming from him. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1319; 1583, p. 1369.

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The lords opposed to the Lord Protector sent Sir Philip Hoby to put their case to the king. As a result, the Lord Protector was imprisoned in Windsor Castle and then taken to the Tower. Shortly after, he was released. 1570, pp. 1548-49; 1576, p. 1320; 1583, p. 1370.

Seymour was imprisoned again in 1551 and charged with treason and felony. He was acquitted of treason, but condemned for felony, intending the death of John Dudley, duke of Northumberland, and others. On 22 January 1552 he was taken to Tower Hill and beheaded. 1570, pp. 1549-50; 1576, p. 1321; 1583, p. 1371.

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Foxe compares the story of Edward Seymour with that of Humphrey of Lancaster, dealing with his enemy Bishop Beaufort. 1563, pp. 882-84; 1570, p. 1551; 1576, p. 1322; 1583, p. 1372.

Edward Seymour is given as an example of one wrongly accused and judged. 1570, p. 1360; 1576, p. 1161; 1583, p. 1189.

 
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Edward VI

(1537 - 1553) [ODNB]

King of England and Ireland (1547 - 53); Henry VIII's only son

The young Prince Edward wrote letters in Latin to Thomas Cranmer, his godfather. 1570, p. 1564; 1576, p. 1334; 1583, p. 1395.

Edward VI agreed with Sir John Cheke that clemency should be shown towards heretics and was opposed to the burning of Joan Bocher. Cranmer had great difficulty in getting Edward to sign her death warrant. 1563, p. 884; 1570, p. 1484; 1576, p. 1258; 1583, p. 1295.

Cranmer praised the learning and wisdom of Edward VI to his tutor, Richard Coxe. 1563, p. 884; 1570, p. 1484; 1576, p. 1258; 1583, p. 1295.

Jerome Cardan gave written testimony of Edward VI's knowledge of the liberal sciences. 1563, p. 885; 1570, p. 1485; 1576, p. 1259; 1583, p. 1296.

Charles V requested of Edward VI that his cousin Mary Tudor be allowed to have the mass said in her house. The request was denied, in spite of the strong urgings of Thomas Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley. 1563, p. 884; 1570, p. 1484; 1576, p. 1258; 1583, p. 1295.

Edward issued a set of injunctions to further the reformation of the church in the realm. He called a parliament to repeal earlier statutes relating to religion, including the Six Articles. 1563, pp. 685-91; 1570, pp. 1486-90; 1576, pp. 1260-63; 1583, pp. 1297-1301.

Having knowledge of rebellions stirring in the realm and of slackness in religious reform in the city of London, Edward called Edmund Bonner to come before his council. 1570, p. 1495; 1576, p. 1267; 1583, p. 1304.

Edward replied to the articles raised by the rebels of Devonshire. 1570, pp. 1497-99; 1576, pp. 1268-70; 1583, pp. 1305-07.

The king and privy council sent out letters to bishops and clergy in late 1549 and 1550, directing that books of Latin service be withdrawn, that altars be removed and communion tables installed. 1563, pp. 726-28; 1570, pp. 1519-21; 1576, pp. 1288-90; 1583, pp. 1330-31.

Edward wrote letters to his sister, Lady Mary, urging her to obey the new laws concerning religion, and she replied. 1576, pp. 1290-96; 1583, pp. 1333-39.

He sent his own councillors to Mary after her servants, Rochester, Englefield and Waldegrave, had failed to prevent masses being said in her household. 1576, pp. 1296-97; 1583, pp. 1338-39.

King Edward said a private prayer on his deathbed which was overheard by his physician, George Owen. In his will, Edward excluded his sister Mary from the succession because of her religious views. 1563, p. 900; 1570, p. 1565; 1576, p. 1335; 1583, p. 1395.

 
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Griffith Leyson

(d. 1555) [See Andrew J. Brown, Robert Ferrar: Yorkshire monk, Reformation Bishop and Martyr in Wales c.1500-1555 (London, 1997) pp. 238-39, 246-47]

Sheriff of Carmarthenshire 1555; dean of court of arches; JP Herefordshire, Shropshire 1555 [SP11/5,no.6]

After Edmund Bonner was sentenced to prison and deprived of his bishopric, the king appointed Lord Rich, Henry marquess of Dorset, Thomas Goodrich, Lord Wentworth, Sir Anthony Wingfield, Sir William Herbert, Nicholas Wotton, Edward Montague, Sir John Baker, Judge Hales, John Gosnold, John Oliver and Griffith Leyson to examine his documents. They confirmed the sentence against him. 1563, p. 725; 1570, p. 1519; 1576, pp. 1287-88; 1583, p. 1330.

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After Stephen Gardiner's sequestration, Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Thomas Goodrich, Henry Holbeach, Sir William Petre, Sir James Hales, Griffith Leyson, John Oliver and John Gosnold were commissioned to examine him. 1563, p. 776; 1570, p. 1535; 1576, p. 1309; 1583, p. 1358.

 
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Henry Grey

(1517 - 1554) [ODNB]

Marquess of Dorset 1530; duke of Suffolk 1551; magnate, father of Lady Jane

The marquess of Dorset carried the salt at the christening of Princess Elizabeth. 1563, p. 509; 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, p. 1054.

After Edmund Bonner was sentenced to prison and deprived of his bishopric, the king appointed Lord Rich, Henry marquess of Dorset, Thomas Goodrich, Lord Wentworth, Sir Anthony Wingfield, Sir William Herbert, Nicholas Wotton, Edward Montague, Sir John Baker, Judge Hales, John Gosnold, John Oliver and Griffith Leyson to examine his documents. They confirmed the sentence against him. 1563, p. 725; 1570, p. 1519; 1576, pp. 1287-88; 1583, p. 1330.

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Grey was a signatory to a letter of commission against Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 777.

 
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John Gosnold

(by 1507 - 1554) [Bindoff]

MP Ipswich (1547, 1553); JP Suffolk (1543 - death); JP Middlesex (1547 - death); solicitor general for Edward VI (1552 - 53)

John Gosnold was a member of the king's commission that attempted to administer an oath to Bishop Bonner and the clergy of St Paul's and that gave Bonner a list of injunctions. 1563, p. 689; 1570, p. 1501; 1576, pp. 1272-73; 1583, p. 1309.

After Edmund Bonner was sentenced to prison and deprived of his bishopric, the king appointed Lord Rich, Henry marquess of Dorset, Thomas Goodrich, Lord Wentworth, Sir Anthony Wingfield, Sir William Herbert, Nicholas Wotton, Edward Montague, Sir John Baker, Judge Hales, John Gosnold, John Oliver and Griffith Leyson to examine his documents. They confirmed the sentence against him. 1563, p. 725; 1570, p. 1519; 1576, pp. 1287-88; 1583, p. 1330.

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After Stephen Gardiner's sequestration, Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Thomas Goodrich, Henry Holbeach, Sir William Petre, Sir James Hales, Griffith Leyson, John Oliver and John Gosnold were commissioned to examine him. 1563, p. 776; 1570, p. 1535; 1576, p. 1309; 1583, p. 1358.

 
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John Oliver

(d. 1552) [ODNB]

BCL Oxford 1516; BCnL 1522; DCL 1522; civil lawyer; dean of King Henry VIII College, Oxford (1533 - 45); one of Wolsey's commissaries (1527 - 29); master in chancery

John Oliver was present at the condemnation of James Bainham in 1532. 1563, p. 499; 1570, p. 1171; 1576, p. 1002; 1583, p. 1029.

After Edmund Bonner was sentenced to prison and deprived of his bishopric, the king appointed Lord Rich, Henry marquess of Dorset, Thomas Goodrich, Lord Wentworth, Sir Anthony Wingfield, Sir William Herbert, Nicholas Wotton, Edward Montague, Sir John Baker, Judge Hales, John Gosnold, John Oliver and Griffith Leyson to examine his documents. They confirmed the sentence against him. 1563, p. 725; 1570, p. 1519; 1576, pp. 1287-88; 1583, p. 1330.

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After Stephen Gardiner's sequestration, Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Thomas Goodrich, Henry Holbeach, Sir William Petre, Sir James Hales, Griffith Leyson, John Oliver and John Gosnold were commissioned to examine him. 1563, p. 776; 1570, p. 1535; 1576, p. 1309; 1583, p. 1358.

 
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Nicholas Wotton

(c. 1497 - 1567) [ODNB; Fasti]

Ecclesiastical lawyer, diplomat; DCnCL; DD

Archdeacon of Gloucester (1540 - ?); secretary of state 1549; dean of Canterbury (1541 - 67) and of York (1544 - 67); ambassador to France (1553 - 57)

Nicholas Wotton was one of the subscribers to the Bishops' Book. 1570, p. 1212; 1576, p. 1037; 1583, p. 1064.

Wotton was one of the signatories to the proclamation against Edward Seymour calling for his removal. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

After Edmund Bonner was sentenced to prison and deprived of his bishopric, the king appointed Lord Rich, Henry marquess of Dorset, Thomas Goodrich, Lord Wentworth, Sir Anthony Wingfield, Sir William Herbert, Nicholas Wotton, Edward Montague, Sir John Baker, Judge Hales, John Gosnold, John Oliver and Griffith Leyson to examine his documents. They confirmed the sentence against him. 1563, p. 725; 1570, p. 1519; 1576, pp. 1287-88; 1583, p. 1330.

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Pietro Matire Vermigli (Peter Martyr)

(1499 - 1562) [ODNB]

b. Florence; Augustinian friar; Greek and Hebrew scholar; evangelical reformer

DTh Padua 1525; abbot in Naples; prior at Lucca

From 1542 in exile: Strasbourg (1542-47); regius professor of divinity at Oxford (1548-49); Strasbourg (1553-56); Zurich (1556-death)

Peter Martyr was brought to Oxford by Edward Seymour. 1563, p. 684; 1570, p. 1486; 1576, p. 1260; 1583, p. 1296.

Peter Martyr, Martin Bucer and Paul Fagius were welcomed as scholars during the reign of Edward VI. 1570, p. 1552; 1576, p. 1323; 1583, p. 1373.

Peter Martyr disputed with William Chedsey and others at Oxford over transubstantiation in 1549. 1570, p. 1519; 1576, p. 1288; 1583, p. 1330.

Doctors Tresham, Chedsey and Morgan Philips were the chief opponents of Peter Martyr in the disputations at Oxford in 1549. 1570, pp. 1552-55; 1576, pp. 1323-26; 1583, pp. 1373-76.

 
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Sir Anthony Wingfield

(ante 1488 - 1552) [ODNB; Bindoff]

Soldier, administrator. MP Suffolk 1529, 1539, 1542, 1547; MP Horsham 1545; JP Suffolk (1510 - death); sheriff Norfolk and Suffolk (1515 - 16); privy councillor (1539 - death)

Vice-chamberlain (1539 - 50); captain of the guard 1539; comptroller of the royal household (1550 - 52)

Sir Anthony Wingfield attended the examination of John Marbeck. When Marbeck was returned to the Marshalsea, Wingfield ordered that he be treated kindly and that his money be protected. 1570, p. 1390; 1576, p. 1186; 1583, p. 1214.

Wingfield was one of the signatories of the letter of the council addressed to Thomas Cranmer ordering the abolishing of images in all churches in the archdiocese. 1563, p. 692; 1570, p. 1490; 1576, p. 1263; 1583, p. 1300.

He was a signatory to a letter from the council to the bishops, instructing them to administer communion in two kinds. 1570, p. 1491; 1576, p. 1264; 1583, p. 1301.

Stephen Gardiner preached a sermon contrary to the king's injunctions. He was arrested and taken to the Tower by Sir Anthony Wingfield and Sir Ralph Sadler; Sadler and William Hunnings were instructed to seal off doors to his house. He was transferred to the Fleet. 1563, pp. 728, 760; 1570, pp. 1521, 1529; 1576, pp. 1297, 1304; 1583, pp. 1340, 1353-54.

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Anthony Wingfield was a deponent in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, pp. 804-5

After Edmund Bonner was sentenced to prison and deprived of his bishopric, the king appointed Lord Rich, Henry marquess of Dorset, Thomas Goodrich, Lord Wentworth, Sir Anthony Wingfield, Sir William Herbert, Nicholas Wotton, Edward Montague, Sir John Baker, Judge Hales, John Gosnold, John Oliver and Griffith Leyson to examine his documents. They confirmed the sentence against him. 1563, p. 725; 1570, p. 1519; 1576, pp. 1287-88; 1583, p. 1330.

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The king sent Richard Lord Rich, Sir Anthony Wingfield and Sir William Petre to his sister, Lady Mary, to ensure she and her household complied with the new laws on religion. 1576, pp. 1296-97; 1583, pp. 1338-39.

 
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Sir James Hales

(d. 1554) [ODNB]

of Canterbury. Judge of the common pleas (1547 - 53); father-in-law of Joyce Hales

After Edmund Bonner was sentenced to prison and deprived of his bishopric, the king appointed Lord Rich, Henry marquess of Dorset, Thomas Goodrich, Lord Wentworth, Sir Anthony Wingfield, Sir William Herbert, Nicholas Wotton, Edward Montague, Sir John Baker, Judge Hales, John Gosnold, John Oliver and Griffith Leyson to examine his documents. They confirmed the sentence against him. 1563, p. 725; 1570, p. 1519; 1576, pp. 1287-88; 1583, p. 1330.

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Sir James Hales and Doctor Briggs were sent as visitors to the Isle of Wight in the Winchester diocese. 1563, pp. 840-41.

After Stephen Gardiner's sequestration, Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Thomas Goodrich, Henry Holbeach, Sir William Petre, Sir James Hales, Griffith Leyson, John Oliver and John Gosnold were commissioned to examine him. 1563, p. 776; 1570, p. 1535; 1576, p. 1309; 1583, p. 1358.

 
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Sir John Baker

(c. 1489 - 1558) [ODNB; Bindoff]

Judge, administrator; MP London 1529, 1536; MP Guildford, 1542; MP Lancaster 1545; MP Huntingdonshire 1547; MP Bramber 1553; MP Kent 1554

Attorney-general (1536 - 40); chancellor of the exchequer (1540 - 58); speaker of the House (1545, 1547)

Sir John Baker was one of the subscribers to the Bishops' Book. 1570, p. 1212; 1576, p. 1037; 1583, p. 1064.

Baker was one of those appointed commissioner for Calais in 1540. 1563, p. 664; 1570, p. 1404; 1576, p. 1197; 1583, p. 1226.

After the execution of Adam Damplip in Calais, John Butler and Daniel the curate were taken to England and imprisoned in the Marshalsea. They stayed there nine months and were accused of having retained Damplip by Sir John Gage, Sir John Baker and Sir Thomas Arundel. [NB: Sir John Gage is named as Sir George Gage in the 1576 and 1583 editions.] 1570, p. 1407; 1576, p. 1200; 1583, p. 1229.

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Before Henry VIII gave his oration to parliament in 1545, the speaker of the House of Commons, Sir John Baker, gave an eloquent oration to the king. 1570, p. 1412; 1576, p. 1203; 1583, p. 1233.

Richard Rich and Sir John Baker went to Anne Askew in the Tower and tried to get her to incriminate others. 1563, p. 676; 1570, p. 1418; 1576, p. 1209; 1583, p. 1238.

Sir John Baker was one of the signatories to the proclamation against Edward Seymour calling for his removal. 1570, p. 1547; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

After Edmund Bonner was sentenced to prison and deprived of his bishopric, the king appointed Lord Rich, Henry marquess of Dorset, Thomas Goodrich, Lord Wentworth, Sir Anthony Wingfield, Sir William Herbert, Nicholas Wotton, Edward Montague, Sir John Baker, Judge Hales, John Gosnold, John Oliver and Griffith Leyson to examine his documents. They confirmed the sentence against him. 1563, p. 725; 1570, p. 1519; 1576, pp. 1287-88; 1583, p. 1330.

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Sir John Baker was a deponent in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 826.

 
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Sir William Herbert

(1506/7 - 1570) [ODNB]

1st earl of Pembroke (1551 - 70); soldier and magnate; Katherine Parr's brother-in-law; MP Wiltshire 1547

Sir William Herbert was appointed to assist Sir John Russell in the west at the time of the Western Rising. 1570, p. 1499; 1576, p. 1271; 1583, p. 1307.

When John Russell replied to the lord protector's request for troops to combat the nobles conspiring against him, Russell said that he and William Herbert both hoped for a reconciliation between the two sides. 1570, p. 1546; 1576, p. 1318; 1583, p. 1368.

After Edmund Bonner was sentenced to prison and deprived of his bishopric, the king appointed Lord Rich, Henry marquess of Dorset, Thomas Goodrich, Lord Wentworth, Sir Anthony Wingfield, Sir William Herbert, Nicholas Wotton, Edward Montague, Sir John Baker, Judge Hales, John Gosnold, John Oliver and Griffith Leyson to examine his documents. They confirmed the sentence against him. 1563, p. 725; 1570, p. 1519; 1576, pp. 1287-88; 1583, p. 1330.

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After Stephen Gardiner had been in the Tower for nearly a year, Sir William Paulet and Sir William Petre, the earl of Warwick and Sir William Herbert delivered the king's letters to him. 1563, pp. 761-62, 766; 1570, pp. 1529-30, 1533; 1576, pp. 1304, 1306; 1583, pp. 1354, 1356.

When Sir William Herbert and Sir William Petre went to Stephen Gardiner in the Tower with new articles, they took with them a canon and a civil lawyer: Nicholas Ridley and Richard Goodrich. 1563, p. 768; 1570, p. 1534; 1576, p. 1307; 1583, p. 1357.

Herbert was a deponent in the case of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, pp. 825-26.

 
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Thomas Goodrich

(1494 - 1554) [ODNB]

BA Cambridge 1510; MA 1514; DCL 1520s

Bishop of Ely (1534 - 54); lord chancellor (1552 - 53)

Goodrich was one of the subscribers to the Bishops' Book. 1570, p. 1211; 1576, p. 1037; 1583, p. 1064.

Goodrich attended a synod in 1537 with other bishops and learned men and with Thomas Cromwell as vicar-general. Goodrich opposed retaining the seven sacraments. 1563, p. 594; 1570, p. 1351; 1576, p. 1153; 1583, p. 1182.

John Marbeck's fourth examination was conducted by John Capon, John Skip, Thomas Goodrich, Robert Oking and William May. 1570, pp. 1393-94; 1576, pp. 1188-89; 1583, pp. 1216-17.

Goodrich recommended Richard Coxe to Henry VIII. 1563, p. 497; 1570, p. 1174; 1576, p. 1004; 1583, p. 1032.

Goodrich was a signatory to a letter from the king and privy council to Nicholas Ridley, directing him to remove and destroy all altars within the churches of his diocese and install communion tables. 1563, p. 727; 1570, pp. 1519-20; 1576, p. 1288; 1583, p. 1331.

Nicholas Ridley, Thomas Goodrich, Sir John Cheke, William May and Thomas Wendy, king's visitors, attended the disputation at Cambridge in 1549. 1570, p. 1555; 1576, p. 1326; 1583, p. 1376.

After Edmund Bonner was sentenced to prison and deprived of his bishopric, the king appointed Richard Rich, Henry marquess of Dorset, Thomas Goodrich, Lord Wentworth, Sir Anthony Wingfield, Sir William Herbert, Nicholas Wotton, Edward Montague, Sir John Baker, Judge Hales, John Gosnold, John Oliver and Griffith Leyson to examine his documents. They confirmed the sentence against him. 1563, p. 725; 1570, p. 1519; 1576, pp. 1287-88; 1583, p. 1330.

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After Stephen Gardiner's sequestration, Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley, Thomas Goodrich, Henry Holbeach, Sir William Petre, Sir James Hales, Griffith Leyson, John Oliver and John Gosnold were commissioned to examine him. 1563, p. 776; 1570, p. 1535; 1576, p. 1309; 1583, p. 1358.

 
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Thomas Wentworth

(1501 - 1550/1) [ODNB; Bindoff]

1st Baron Wentworth; cousin of Edward Seymour

JP Suffolk (1523 - death); privy councillor 1549; chamberlain, the Household (1550 - death); MP Suffolk 1529; sympathetic to religious reformers

John Kirby and Roger Clarke were arrested at Ipswich in 1546 and brought before Thomas Wentworth and other commissioners. When Kirby was burnt at Ipswich, Wentworth wept. 1563, pp. 654; 1570, pp. 1410-11; 1576, pp. 1202-03; 1583, p. 1232.

After Edmund Bonner was sentenced to prison and deprived of his bishopric, the king appointed Lord Rich, Henry marquess of Dorset, Thomas Goodrich, Lord Wentworth, Sir Anthony Wingfield, Sir William Herbert, Nicholas Wotton, Edward Montague, Sir John Baker, Judge Hales, John Gosnold, John Oliver and Griffith Leyson to examine his documents. They confirmed the sentence against him. 1563, p. 725; 1570, p. 1519; 1576, pp. 1287-88; 1583, p. 1330.

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He was a signatory to a letter from the king and privy council to Nicholas Ridley, directing him to remove and destroy all altars within the churches of his diocese and install communion tables. 1563, p. 727; 1570, pp. 1519-20; 1576, p. 1288; 1583, p. 1331.

He was a signatory to a letter of commission against Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 777.

 
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William Chedsey

(1510/11 - 1577?) [ODNB]

Catholic priest; BA Oxford 1530; MA 1534; BTh 1542; DTh 1546; chaplain to Edmund Bonner, bishop of London, by 1536; archdeacon of Middlesex 1556; president of Corpus Christi, Oxford 1558;

Peter Martyr disputed with William Chedsey and others at Oxford over transubstantiation in 1549. 1570, p. 1519; 1576, p. 1288; 1583, p. 1330.

Doctors Tresham, Chedsey and Morgan Philips were the chief opponents of Peter Martyr in the disputations at Oxford in 1549. 1570, pp. 1552-55; 1576, pp. 1323-26; 1583, pp. 1373-76.

Doctors Smyth, Chedsey, Standish, Young and Oglethorpe recanted their earlier conservative positions by the last year of the reign of King Edward VI. 1570, p. 1522; 1576, p. 1323; 1583, p. 1373.

 
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Marshalsea

[Marshalsey]

Prison on the south bank of the Thames in Southwark, London

1354 [1330]

King Edw. 6. Boners letters, and supplication. Boners depriuation. Bookes in Latine repeled.

MarginaliaAnno 1549.out the whole raigne of Queene Marie. From the executing of the which like tirannie, the Lord of his great mercy keepe all other such. Amen.

Now immediately after his depriuation, he writeth out of the Marshalsey other letters supplicatorie vnto þe Lord Chancelor and the rest of the kings Counsaile. Wherein he thus complaineth, that by reason of the great enemity that the Duke of Somerset and sir Thomas Smith bare vnto him, his often and earnest suites vnto the King and hys counsaile could not be heard. Hee therefore moste humbly desireth their Lordships for the causes aforesaide, to consider him, and to let him haue libertie to prosecute his matter before them, and he woulde daily pray for the good preseruation of theyr honors, as appeareth by the woordes of his owne supplication here vnder following.

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Thus after the Commissioners had finished with Boner, he being now prisoner in the Marshalsey, leauing no shift of the law vnsought how to worke for him self as wel as he mighte, drewe out a certaine supplication, conceiued and directed to the kings maiestie, out of the sayd prison of the Marshalsey.

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To the right honourable, my Lorde Chancelor of England, with all the rest of the kings Maiesties most honorable priuie counsel.

PLease it your most honourable good Lordshippes wyth my moste humble commendations to vnderstande that all beit heeretofore I haue made such sute, and to such persons as I cannot deuise to make more, or to more higher, it is to wit, vnto the kings most excellent maiestie, and his most gratious persons in diuers sorts, and also vnto your most honorable good Lordships being of his priuie counsell, for redresse or suche notable and manifest iniuries and extremities as hath bene contrary to all law, honestie, and good reason inflicted vnto me by my Lord of Canterburie, my Lorde of Rochester, Doctor Smith, and Doctor May, yet because the sayd Doctor Smith being a minister to the Duke of Somerset, and they both my deadly ennemies, hath sondry wayes studied and laboured my ruine and destruction, staying and letting heretofore all my lawfull remedies and sutes, hauing therein helpe and furtherance of these two other aforesayd persons, being ready at foote and hand to accomplish all theyr desires and pleasures, I shall at this presente hauing for a time forborne to trouble (for good respectes) your moste honorable good Lordshyppes, with any my sutes, and especially for your other manifold great affaires in the kinges Maiesties businesse: my selfe yet the meane while, neither wanting good will, ne yet iust cause being where I am to make such sute, renue my sute, and most humbly beseeche your most honorable good lordshippes to geue me leaue to make most humble supplication againe to your sayd Lordshippes, for honest and lawful libertie to prosecute my appellatiō and supplication heretofore made to the kings moste excellent Maiestie, and according to the law to make my sute for redresse of the sayde great and manifest iniuries, extremities and wrongs don against me by the sayd parsones. And your sayd Lordships ouer and besides the furtheraunce of iustice, many wayes herein to me and other, and the collection of the kinges maiestie Subsidie, nowe to be leuied of the Clergie in my diocesse which hetherto hath ben, and is staied by reason of the premisses, shall also binde me moste greatly and intirely to pray daily for the good preseruation of your sayd moste honourable good Lordshippes in all honour, felicitie and ioy long to continue and endure vnto Gods pleasure. Wrytten in the Marshalsey, the 26. of October. 1549.

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Your Lordships most faithful & assured Bedes man. E. Lon.

A supplication made and directed by Edmund Boner late B. of London, to the kings Maiestie, out of the prison of the Marshalsey.

MarginaliaBoners supplication to the king.In the which supplication, first after the vsed forme of stile, he praied for the prosperous estate of the king long to raigne. Then he shewed that his faithful heart and seruice to him, hath, is, and shall be, as it was to his father before.

Then he declared how he had ben belied of euil men, and misreported not to beare a true hart to his grace, but a rebellious minde, in denying his royall power in his minoritie, where in deede (he sayeth) his grace should finde hym alwayes during life, both in heart, woorde, and deede, to do and acknowledge otherwise, & to be most willing to shew, &c. and to doe all other thinges for his grace, as willingly as any other subiecte, or as those that were his denoūcers, who hee thought were not sent of his grace, but pretensed Commissioners. &c.

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Further, he complained of his denuntiation by certaincommissioners (who sayde they were sent by his grace) alleaging the same not to be lawful: and of his long & sharpe imprisonment, & that the commissioners obserued neyther law nor reasonable order, but extremitie. And wher he had made appeale to his grace, and he coulde not haue it: he desired to haue lawe to prosecute & sue his appeale for his remedy, & that he cōsidering his vocation, might not be shut vp & put from libertie, which his meanest subiects haue.

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Then he desired hys graces letters of Supersedeas against the commissioners, and that the matter might be heard before the counsaile, and then he doubted not but to be found a true faithfull man, and herein to haue wrong. So in the ende hee concluded, this (prostrating him selfe euen to the very ground, and humbly kissing his graces fete) to be the thing onely which he humbly desired. &c.

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MarginaliaBoners appellation to the king. perused & tryed and found by the Lawe vneffectuall and vnreasonable.THis done, & the supplication perused, the King eftsoone geueth in charge and commaundement, to certain men of honor and worship, & persons skilfull in the lawe, as to Lorde Rich high Chancelor, the L. treasurer, the L. Marques Dorset, the B. of Ely, Lord Wentworth, sir Anthony Wingfield, sir W. Harbert knightes. Doc. Nich. Wootton, Ed. Mountague Lorde chiefe Iustice, Sir Iohn Baker knight, with Iudge Hales, Ioh. Gosnold, D. Oliuer and also Doctour Leyson, that they scanning and perusing all such actes, matters, and muniments of the sayd Boner by him exhibited, produced, propounded and alleaged, with al and singular his protestations, recusations, & appellatiōs, should vpon mature consideration therof, geue their directed answere vpon the same, whether the appellation of the said Boner were to be deferred vnto, and whether the sentence defined against him, stood by the law sufficient and effectual, or not. MarginaliaThe sentence of Boners depriuation by the Peeres & learned men of the realme, found to be iust and lawfull.Who eftsoones after diligent discussion, and considerate aduisement had of all & singular the premisses, gaue their resolute answere, that the pretensed appellation of Edmund Boner aforesayde, was nought and vnreasonable, and in no wise to be deferred vnto, and that the sentence by the Commissioners against him, was rightly and iustly pronounced. And this was the cōclusion of Boners whole matter and depriuation for that time.

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MarginaliaThe first trouble of the L. Protector was about the moneth of Octob. an. 1549.Thus then leauing doctor Boner a while in the Marshalsey with his keeper, we will proceede (the Lorde permitting) further in the course of our storie, as the order of yeres and time requireth. And although the trouble of the Lord Protector falleth heere ioyntly with the depriuatiō of D. Boner: yet because he was shortly again deliuered out of the same throughe the Lordes mightye woorking, I will therefore delay the tractation thereof, till the time of his seconde trouble, whych was two yeares after: and so in the meane time returning againe into our discourse, intēd by the Lords leaue, to collect and continue the matters begō, touching þe kings godly proceedings for reformatiō of religion, in the foresaid yere of our lord, concurring. an. 1549.

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MarginaliaDisputation of Peter Martyr, with Doct. Chedsey in Oxforde.And heere first a note woulde be made of Peter Martyr and of his learned trauels, and disputation in the vniuersitie of Oxford the sayde present yeare, with doct. Chedsey, & other moe, about the matter of the sacrament: which was, that the substance of breade and wine was not changed in the sacrament, & that the body and bloude of Christe was not carnally and bodily in the bread and wine, but vnited to the same sacramentally.

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MarginaliaEcclesiasticall lawes by Acte of Parlament to be compyled by 32. persons. Statut. an. 3. Edou. 6.In like maner some touch or mention here also would be made of the Ecclesiasticall lawes, for the gathering and compiling wherof 32. persons were assigned by Act of parlament the sayde present yeare 1549. Bnt because these bee rather matters of tractation, then Hystoricall, I meane, (God willing) to deferre the further consideration thereof vnto the ende of the historie of this kinges dayes, and so to passe forward to other matters in the meane while.

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Bookes of Latine seruice celled in and abolished. 
Commentary  *  Close
Ridley's reforms

The campaign against altars followed naturally from the abolition of the mass in the Prayer Book of 1549. One of the standard methods of evasion practiced by conservative clergy was to continue the use of traditional altars for the administration of the communion, where, by speaking the words of the rite sotto voce, they could persuade their congregations (and perhaps themselves) that nothing had changed. Cranmer' s campaign was preluded by a sede vacante visitation of Norwich diocese following the resignation of William Rugge in January 1550. This was conducted by Rowland Tayor and William Wakefield, and one of their principal targets was the survival of 'massing'. Cranmer then took advantage of a similar vacancy in London, where Bonner had been deprived on the 1st October 1549 and Nicholas Ridley was not translated from Rochester until 1st April 1550. Thereafter Ridley took up the campaign with enthusiasm. (See Diarmaid MacCulloch,. Tudor Church Militant, 1999, pp.96-9)

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David Loades
University of Sheffield

MarginaliaEuill disposed people thinking to haue their latin seruice again after the apprehension of the L. Protectour.IT followeth then in storie, that certaine of the vulgare multitude, hearing of the apprehension of the Lord Protectour, and supposinge the alteration of publicke Seruice into Englishe, and administration of the Sacramente and other rites lately appoynted in the Churche, had beene the Acte chiefly or only of the sayd Lorde Protectour, beganne vppon the same to noyse and brute abroad, that they shuld nowe haue theyr olde Latine seruice, wyth holy bread and holy water, and theyr other like superstitious ceremonies againe, whereuppon the King wyth the body and state of the priuie Counsell then being, MarginaliaThe kings commaundement to the Byshops.directed oute his letters of request and straite commaundement to the Byshoppes in their diocesse, to cause and warne the Deane, and Prebendaries of their Cathedrall Churches, all Persons, vicares and Curates: with the Churchwardens of euery Parishe

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with
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