Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Nicholas Harpsfield

(1519? - 1575)

Archdeacon of Canterbury; vicar-general of London. Author of the most important contemporary attack on the Acts and Monuments. Younger brother of John Harpsfield [DNB]

Nicholas Harpsfield discussed the sacrament and ceremonies with Thomas Hawkes on 30 June 1554, but soon gave up hope of changing Hawke's opinions. 1563, p. 1156; 1570, p. 1764; 1576, p. 1507; 1583, p. 1590

Harpsfield took depositions regarding John Tooley's heretical speech from the gallows. 1563, p. 1144

He examined Thomas Wattes on 4 May 1555 and he urged Wattes to recant. Wattes refused, telling Harpsfield that his efforts were in vain. 1563, p. 1165; 1570, p. 1771; 1576, p. 1512; 1583, 1596

Nicholas Harpsfield is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

On 28 May Nicholas Harpsfield had the mayor's sergeant bring John Bland before him, and Master Collins (comissary), in Thornden's house. Talk took place between Harspfield, Collins and Bland. 1563, pp. 1220-21, 1570, pp. 1845-46, 1576, pp. 1579-80, 1583, p. 1667.

On 21 May Bland appeared in the chapter house before Nicholas Harspfield. 1563, pp. 1221-23, 1570 p. 1846, 1576 p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Bland asked that Richard Thornden, bishop of Dover, and Robert Collins, commissary, be present at the disputation over the sacrament between Nicholas Harspfield and Bland. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Nicholas Sheterden discussed eucharistic doctrine with the archdeacon Nicholas Harpsfield and Robert Collins. 1563, pp. 1231-32, 1570, p. 1853, 1576, pp. 1585-86, 1583, pp. 1673-74.

William Cokar was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Richard Colliar was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

William Hopper was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Henry Lawrence was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

William Sterne was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688.

George Brodbridge was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August for having refused to say confession to a priest. 1563, p. 1273. The examination is referred to in 1570, p. 1884, 1576, p. 1614, 1583, p. 1708.

Anthony Burwarde was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

Robert Streater was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

James Tutrye was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

John Webbe was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden. 1563, pp. 1386-87, 1570, pp. 1959-60, 1576, p. 1687, 1583, p. 1794.

Harpsfield is described as a great persecutor. 1563, p. 1546, 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1954.

Thomas Alsey met with John Kingston to discuss the delivery of forty-six shillings and eight pence to Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

Martin Bradbridge was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Nicholas Final was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Hay was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Thomas Hudson was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Stephen Kempe was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Lowick was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 2155, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

John Philpot of Tenterden was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Matthew Plaise was examined by Thornden, Nicholas Harpsfield and Collins. 1570, pp. 2169-71, 1576, pp. 1873-75, 1583, pp. 1982-83.

Harpsfield took part in Richard Woodman's fifth and sixth examinations. 1563, pp. 1599-1601, 1570, pp. 2190-94, 1576, pp. 1890-93, 1583, pp. 1999-2002.

William Prowting was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Thomas Stephens was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 2155, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Waterman was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Nicholas Harpsfield urged on the condemnation of five martyrs at Canterbury so that they could be burned before the death of Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2253, 1576, p. 1946, 1583, p. 2053.

Harpsfield was committed to the Fleet after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richard Thornden

(d. 1558)

Suffragan Bishop of Dover (1545-1558) [ODNB]

Richard Thornden is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

On 13 June 1555 John Bland was brought before Thornden. 1563, p. 1229, 1570, pp. 1851-52, 1576, pp. 1585-86, 1583, p. 1672.

Bland asked that the bishop of Dover and Master Collins be present at the disputation over the sacrament between Harspfield and Bland. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

On 20 June, Bland was reexamined, his articles read by the bishop of Dover and Bland's answers made. 1563, p. 1229.

Bland referred to Thornden's library as a source for texts for any discussion of scripture. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Thornden stated that Bland had preached many heresies. Faucet wais present during this discussion. 1563, p. 1225, 1570, p. 1849, 1576, p. 1582, 1583, p. 1670.

Bland asked that Richard Thornden, bishop of Dover, and Robert Collins, commissary, be present at the disputation over the sacrament between Nicholas Harspfield and Bland. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Cyriac Pettit was present during the disputation between Bland and Nicholas Harpsfield on 21 May 1555. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

On 28 May Nicholas Harpsfield had the mayor's sergeant bring Bland and Master Collins (comissary) before him, in Thornden's house. 1563, pp. 1220-21, 1570, pp. 1845-46, 1576, pp. 1579-80, 1583, p. 1667.

On 13 June [1555] Bland was brought before Richard Thornden, Robert Collins and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1229, 1570, pp. 1851-52, 1576, pp. 1585-86, 1583, p. 1672.

Thornden asked Bland if he knew of Oecolompadius and Zwingli, to which Bland responded that he had seen 'parte of their doinges'. 1563, p. 1226, 1570, p. 1850, 1576, p. 1583, 1583, p. 1671.

On 20 June Bland was reexamined and his articles read by Richard Thornden. Bland's answers were made and condemnation given. 1563, pp. 1229-30, 1570, p. 1852, 1576, p. 1582, 1583, pp. 1672-73.

Bland was condemned by Dover. 1563, p. 1230, 1570, p. 1852, 1576, p. 1582, 1583, pp. 1672-73.

Bland, Sheterden and Middleton were condemned on 25 June 1555. 1570, p. 1856, 1576, p. 1588, 1583, pp. 1675-76.

He examined and condemned John Frankesh. 1570, p. 1856, 1576, p. 1588, 1583, pp. 1675-76.

He examined and condemned Humphrey Middleton. 1570, p. 1856, 1576, p. 1588, 1583, pp. 1675-76.

He took part in the last examination of Nicholas Sheterden and condemned him on 25 June 1555. 1570, p. 1856, 1576, p. 1588, 1583, pp. 1675-76.

Thornden examined and condemned William Cokar. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

He examined Richard Colliar. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

He condemned Colliar on either 26 June, 26 July (1570, p. 1859,1576, p. 1591, 1583, p. 1678) or16 August 1555 (1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688).

He examined and condemned William Hopper. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

He condemned Hopper on 26 June or 26 July 1555 (1570, p. 1859,1576, p. 1591, 1583, p. 1678) or 16 July 1555 (1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688).

He examined and condemned Henry Laurence. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

He condemned Laurence on 26 June or 26 July (1570, p. 1859,1576, p. 1591, 1583, p. 1678) or 2 August 1555 (1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688).

He examined and condemned William Sterne. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688.

Thornden was referred to by William Sterne as 'Dick of Dover'. 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688.

Thornden examined and condemned Richard Wright. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

George Catmer, Robert Streater, George Brodbridge, Anthony Burwarde and James Tutty, martyrs, were examined by the bishop of Dover. 1563, p. 1273, 1570, p. 1884, 1576, p. 1613, 1583, p. 1707.

John Web was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden. 1563, pp. 1386-87, 1570, pp. 1959-60, 1576, p. 1687, 1583, p. 1794.

A mass was said at Canterbury by Thornden after the death of Edward VI. 1563, p. 1474 [recte 1472], 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1871.

John Newman was apprehended in Kent and examined there by Thornden and others at Tenterden. 1570, p. 2134, 1576, p. 1856, 1583, pp. 1686-87, p. 1950.

Newman was brought before Bonner and condemned with Denley and Packingham. Newman wrote a letter to Thornden about his conduct and doctrine. 1570, p. 2134, 1576, p. 1856, 1583, p. 1950.

Thornden is described as a great persecutor. 1563, p. 1546, 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1954.

Thornden condemned John Philpot of Tenterden, William Hay of Hythe, Thomas Hudson of Selling, Matthew Bradbridge of Tenterden, Thomas Stephens of Biddenden, Nicholas Final of Tenterden, William Lowick of Cranbrooke, and William Prowting of Thornham. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].]

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Joan Bradbridge, Walter Apelbye of Maidstone, Petronyll, his wife, Edmund Allin of Frittenden, Katherine,his wife, Joan Mannings, wife of Maidstone, Elizabeth, a blind maiden were all examined by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1570, 1570, p. 2161, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1976.

Edward Benden petitioned the wealthy men of Staplehurst to write to Thornden, bishop of Dover, asking that his wife, Alice Benden, be released. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

Benden told Thornden that his wife was being manipulated by her brother, Roger Hall, who gave her money, comforted her, and persuaded her not to attend mass. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

Benden told Thornden that she would not be shriven by her parish priest if sent home. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

Thornden released her, telling her to go to church 'when thou wilt'. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

Thornden sent Alice Benden to 'Monday's Hole' prison. Her brother had great difficulty in finding where she was imprisoned but eventually found her five weeks after she had been moved. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

On 25 March 1557 Alice Benden was called before Thornden, who asked her to relent. She refused, telling him that his treatment of her was not of God. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

Thornden sent her to Westgate, where she was cleaned up, but her skin was so poor and her body so weak, that she could hardly walk and her skin peeled away. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

She remained at Westgate until the end of April, when she was brought before Thornden and condemned. She was then sent to the Castle. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

Martin Bradbridge was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Nicholas Final was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Hay was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Thomas Hudson was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Stephen Kempe was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Lowick was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 2155, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

John Philpot of Tenterden was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Matthew Plaise was examined by Thornden, Nicholas Harpsfield and Collins. 1570, pp. 2169-71, 1576, pp. 1873-75, 1583, pp. 1982-83.

William Prowting was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Thomas Stephens was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Waterman was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Joan Bradbridge had two children, Patience and Charity. She asked Thornden to protect them after her death but he refused. 1570, p. 2169, 1576, p. 1873, 1583, p. 1981.

Thornden was taken with a palsy whilst watching a game of bowls at Bourne. 1563, p. 1706, 1570, p. 2298, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

Thornden died in the pulpit after giving pardon and remission of sins to his congregation. 1563, p. 1705.

[Referred to as 'Thorton' and 'Dick of Dover'.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Maidstone
Maidstone, Maydstone
NGR: TQ 760 555

A borough and parish, having separate jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Maidstone, lathe of Aylesford, county of Kent, of which it is the county town. 8 miles south from Rochester. The living is a perpetual curacy in the peculiar jurisdiction and patronage of the Archbishop of Canterbury

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2002 [1978]

Q. Mary. The examination, answers, and condemnation of Stephen Gratwicke, Martyr.

MarginaliaAnno 1557. Iune.Note my lord, he saith not as you haue affirmed, but clene contrary. And with that they were all in a great rage.

Winch. And the bish. of Winchester said, I belied the text.

Grat. And then I called for the text.

Winch. And he said, I asked thee euen now if thou vnderstoodest Latine, and thou saidest, whether I can or no, the people shall beare witnesse in English.

Grat. And so I called againe for the Testament, whether it were Latin or English for the triall of the text.

Winch. And then when the bish. of Winchester sawe that I cared not, whether of the Translations I had, he stoode vp, thinking to beguile some simple man that had a booke there, & bad him that had an English Testament to bring it in, that he might get some hold at him that should bring a testament, MarginaliaNo English Testament durst be brought.but God disappointed him therof, & so he flue away from his matter, and began to raile vpon me, & said my subtill Arguments shuld not serue, for if I would not answer directly, I should neuerthelesse be excommunicated: for (sayd he) I see a madde toy in thine head: thou gloriest muche in thy talke, and thinkest nowe the people are come about thee, that thou shalt encourage them with thy constant heretical opinion. For þe last day when thou wast before me vpon Sonday in s. Mary Oueries church, MarginaliaThe Bishop of Winchester reproued of Gratwicke in his Sermon.thou there reprouedst my sermon, & haddest a thousand by thee at the lest, to bid God strengthen thee: but now let me see him here that dare open his mouth to bid God strēgthen thee: MarginaliaThe Bishop of Winchester threatneth them that prayeth to God to strengthen Gratwicke.he shall die the death that thou shalt die.

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Grat. To that I answered: my Lord I know your crueltie doth extend more largelier then your pity. Good experience so I haue to say, for you kepe men in prison a yeare or two, taking their bookes from them, permitting thē not so muche as a Testament to looke vppon for theyr soules comfort, the which all men oughte to haue: MarginaliaThe cruelty of Catholickes vpon Christian prisoners.and so you entreat them more like brute beastes then Christen men.

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Winch. No, syr we will vse you as we will vse the childe, for if the childe will hurte himselfe with the knife, we will kepe the knife from him. MarginaliaA Popish similitude well applyed.So because you wil damne your soule with the woord, therefore you shall not haue it.

Grat. My lord, a simple argument you bring for to maintaine and couer your fault. Are you not ashamed to make the woord the cause of our damnation? I neuer knew any man but only you that did not affirm our sinnes to be the cause of our damnation, and not the word, as you say: and therfore if your Argument be good, then this is good also: MarginaliaWinchester ouerthrowen in his owne similitude.Because that some men do abuse drinke, therefore the benefite of drinke should be taken from al men, or any other such like good gift.

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Winch. My lordes, here we lose much time, for this felow is peruerse, speaking nothing but sophistrie and peruerse questions: so that we can get no aduantage vpon him.

Then spake my Counterfait Ordinarie, as one halfe a sleepe al this while: yet somwhat with hast, when he was awaked he began to tell his tale, and sayde.

Counterf. Read these articles against him once more, and if he wil not answer them, take him vpon his first words: That which I said, that I haue said.

Winch.Then the Bishop of Winchester began to reade them againe.

Grat. But I sayd vnto him, I would not aunswere them, because they were none of mine examinations, but obiections of their owne making, because they would haue my bloud. But yet I said, if they would set the lawe a part, I would talke my conscience freely to them.

Counterf. Then my counterfet Ordinarie began to speake againe, charging mee with the saying of S. Peter, that I should render account of such hope as was in me.

Grat. So can I do, and yet shal I not please you, for here I now render my hope as S. Peter willeth me: MarginaliaThese Catholickes will not be contented with confessing of Christ onely.I beleue only in Iesus Christ, to haue my saluatiō in him, by him, and through him: but I perceiue you would haue me rēder my faith in such sorte, as you may haue my bloud, and therfore you bring good Scriptures and euil apply them.

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Win. Why, this felow is peruerted, & we shal get no more at his hands then we haue already: therfore lette vs pronounce sentence against him, for we do but lose our time.

Grat. Nay good my lordes, seeing you wil nedes haue my bloud, let me say a little more for my selfe.Vpon sonday last, whē I was before you, you preached this, which was a truth, & agreeable to the doctrine of the apostle s. Iames, and said: If any mā thinke himself a religious man, & in the meane time seduce his toung or hys heart, þe same mans religion is a vain religion: MarginaliaThe rayling Sermon of Winchester agaynst good men. MarginaliaWinchester preacheth agaynst him selfe.and so my lord you stāding there in þe pulpit, in þe mean time seduced your tōg to slander vs pore prisoners being there present in yron bondes, burdening vs wt the secte of Arrians. and wt the sect of Herodiās, and wt the sect of Anbabaptists, and wt the sect of sacramentaries, & with the secte of Pelagiās.

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And when we stoode vp to purge our selues therof, you

saide you would cut out our tonges, & cause vs to be pulled out of the church by violēce. MarginaliaTrue Christiās not suffered to purge themselues.But there you gaue your selfe a shrewde blow, for your toungue in the meane time slandered your neighbor. For I my Lord wil geue my life against all these heresies, the which you ther burdened vs withall, euen as I will geue my life against MarginaliaHe meaneth agaynst the reall presence.that wherein I now stand before you. And with that he was raging angry, and caught my condemnation and said.

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Win. Thou wilt graunt here no more, but this word: that I haue said, I haue said: and here I gather matter enough to condemne thee, for this is a confirmation of all þt thou hast heretofore said.

Grat. Then I answered: If you can proue that euer any of mine examinatiōs were written, it were inough: but you haue nothåg agaåst me, but obiectiōs of your own makåg.

Win. Haue at thee now. If thou wil not yelde, I wil pronounce sentence against thee, MarginaliaWinchester condemneth Stephen Gratwick, and why?and so he proceded forth onward apace, curssing and banning in Latin: so that I told him: If the people might heare it in English, they would thinke you an vncharitable bishop.

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Grat. And then I said, stay my Lorde and note what you doe, MarginaliaStephen Gratwicke condemned agaynst order, both of temporall and spirituall lawe.for you haue neither temporall law nor spiritual here against me in any cause.

Then stepped foorth a gentleman & said vnto my Lord: take hede what you do, for he doth hear say that you haue no title nor cause why you should condemne him.

Then the bish. looked about him againe, and asked me if I would recant.

I asked him whereof I should recant?

Then saide the bish. are you there? nay then I knowe what I haue to do, and so he proceded forth in reading my condemnation. And there was an other gentlemā which began to snap and snatch at me: and then said I, I would God I had knowen this or euer I had come from home: I would surely haue put on breeche, and not had my skin thus torne. And all this while the Bishop red foorth still.

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At last his chaplains cried, stop, stop my Lord, for now he will recant, 

Commentary  *  Close

Once the sentence had been read, it was final unless the condemned secured a royal pardon. By pausing, Bishop White is giving Gratwick a last chance to recant and save his life.

and then the bishop asked me againe.

MarginaliaStephen Gratwicke constant in Christ and in his death.And I answered & sayd: my lord, my faith is grounded more stedfastly, then to change in a momēt, it is no proces of time can alter me, vnles my faith were as the waues of the sea: and so the B. made an end, & deliuered me into the hands of the sheriff, to be caried prisoner to the Marshalsey againe. And when I was condemned, MarginaliaGratwicke after his condemnation prayeth for his enemyes.I desired God with a loud voice that he would not lay my bloud to their charges, if it were his good will, & so then they refused my praier and sent me away. Then I beganne to talke as I went, and they cried, cut out his toung, or stop his mouth, and so I was broughte to the Malshalsey, and lapped in yron bandes. Therefore I pray vnto God that they vnto whom this present wryting shal come, may take example by my death and souldiour fare. So be it. By me Steuen Gratwicke, condemned for Gods euerlasting truth.

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MarginaliaStephen Gratwicke to the Reader.HEere for want of time I haue left out many matters, because the Lord hath hastened the time, so that I haue wrytten but the briefnes of the matter in probation of faith, and the reward of faith, the which the bish. of Roch. & I debated vpon: the whych matter I wold haue ben very glad to haue set down in wryting.

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Also much more talke there was, that the B. of Winch. and I had concerning my worldly frendes & personable estate: for he plaied sathan with me, MarginaliaWinchester attempteth Stephen Gratwick with flattering and praysing.hee caried me vp to the mountaines, and there told me, my learning was good and my eloquēce, and also my knowledge, saue that I did abuse it (saide he): and then he fell to praising of my person, that it was comely & worthy to serue a Prince. Thus Sathan flattered with me to make me aunsweare vnto such obiections as he woulde lay against me, that I mighte fall into his Diocesse.

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Thus Steuen Gratwicke this Christian Martyr, being wrongfully condemned by the bish. of Winchester (as ye haue heard) was burned with William Moraunt, and one King, in s. Georges field, about þe latter end of May.

Seuen godlye Martyrs, v. women and ij. men, burned at Maidstone for the word of truth, and professing of sincere religion of Christ. 
Commentary  *  Close
Edmund Allin and Other Kentish Martyrs

In the 1563 edition, Foxe simply had the names of the martyrs, the date of their executions and he had apparently seen the records of their trial in the consistory court of Canterbury. (Their condemnation remains among Foxe's papers as BL, Harley MS 590, fos. 78v-79r). In 1570, Foxe added an account of Allin's return from exile in Calais, his execution and then, in a flashback, Foxe described Allin's earlier arrest. (As Foxe notes, his informants for this were Richard Fletcher and John Webbe). Foxe also had copy of Allin's informal examination by Sir John Baker, which he printed in this edition. And, in the same edition, he printed an account which he obtained from Roger Hall, the brother of the martyr Alice Benden, of Edmund Allin's escape from Baker and his flight overseas (see Thomas S. Freeman, 'Notes on a Source for John Foxe's Account of the Marian Persecution in Kent and Sussex' Historical Journal 67 (1994), pp. 203-11). This last account was deleted, probably accidentally, from the 1583 edition; otherwise the narrative of these martyrs remained unchanged.

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MarginaliaIune. 18.I Shewed a litle before, how after the vnmerciful proclamation was sent & set forth by the K. and Quene, in the month of Febr. last, the storme of persecution began in all places to rise (whereof some part also is declared before:) but yet in no place more thē in þe country & dioces of Cāt. by reason of certaine the aforesaid inquisitors, being now armed wt authority, but especially by reasō of MarginaliaRichard Thornton, Nicholas Harpsfield, persecutors.Ric. Thornton Suffragan of Douer, and the Archd. of Cant. who of their owne nature were so furious and fierye against the harmles flocke of Christ, þt there was no nede of any proclamation to stir vp the coles of their burning crueltie: by reason wherof many a godly Saint lieth slaine vnder the altare: as in diuers places of this booke wel may appeare.

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And
OOOOo.j.
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