Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Matthew Plaise

Weaver. Of Stone, Kent.

Matthew Plaise was examined by Thornden, Nicholas Harpsfield and Collins. 1570, pp. 2169-71, 1576, pp. 1873-75, 1583, pp. 1982-83.

Foxe did not know what happened to Plaise after his examination. 1570, p. 2171, 1576, p. 1875, 1583, p. 1983.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Nicholas Harpsfield

(1519? - 1575)

Archdeacon of Canterbury; vicar-general of London. Author of the most important contemporary attack on the Acts and Monuments. Younger brother of John Harpsfield [DNB]

Nicholas Harpsfield discussed the sacrament and ceremonies with Thomas Hawkes on 30 June 1554, but soon gave up hope of changing Hawke's opinions. 1563, p. 1156; 1570, p. 1764; 1576, p. 1507; 1583, p. 1590

Harpsfield took depositions regarding John Tooley's heretical speech from the gallows. 1563, p. 1144

He examined Thomas Wattes on 4 May 1555 and he urged Wattes to recant. Wattes refused, telling Harpsfield that his efforts were in vain. 1563, p. 1165; 1570, p. 1771; 1576, p. 1512; 1583, 1596

Nicholas Harpsfield is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

On 28 May Nicholas Harpsfield had the mayor's sergeant bring John Bland before him, and Master Collins (comissary), in Thornden's house. Talk took place between Harspfield, Collins and Bland. 1563, pp. 1220-21, 1570, pp. 1845-46, 1576, pp. 1579-80, 1583, p. 1667.

On 21 May Bland appeared in the chapter house before Nicholas Harspfield. 1563, pp. 1221-23, 1570 p. 1846, 1576 p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Bland asked that Richard Thornden, bishop of Dover, and Robert Collins, commissary, be present at the disputation over the sacrament between Nicholas Harspfield and Bland. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Nicholas Sheterden discussed eucharistic doctrine with the archdeacon Nicholas Harpsfield and Robert Collins. 1563, pp. 1231-32, 1570, p. 1853, 1576, pp. 1585-86, 1583, pp. 1673-74.

William Cokar was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Richard Colliar was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

William Hopper was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Henry Lawrence was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

William Sterne was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688.

George Brodbridge was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August for having refused to say confession to a priest. 1563, p. 1273. The examination is referred to in 1570, p. 1884, 1576, p. 1614, 1583, p. 1708.

Anthony Burwarde was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

Robert Streater was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

James Tutrye was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

John Webbe was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden. 1563, pp. 1386-87, 1570, pp. 1959-60, 1576, p. 1687, 1583, p. 1794.

Harpsfield is described as a great persecutor. 1563, p. 1546, 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1954.

Thomas Alsey met with John Kingston to discuss the delivery of forty-six shillings and eight pence to Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

Martin Bradbridge was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Nicholas Final was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Hay was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Thomas Hudson was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Stephen Kempe was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Lowick was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 2155, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

John Philpot of Tenterden was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Matthew Plaise was examined by Thornden, Nicholas Harpsfield and Collins. 1570, pp. 2169-71, 1576, pp. 1873-75, 1583, pp. 1982-83.

Harpsfield took part in Richard Woodman's fifth and sixth examinations. 1563, pp. 1599-1601, 1570, pp. 2190-94, 1576, pp. 1890-93, 1583, pp. 1999-2002.

William Prowting was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Thomas Stephens was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 2155, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Waterman was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Nicholas Harpsfield urged on the condemnation of five martyrs at Canterbury so that they could be burned before the death of Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2253, 1576, p. 1946, 1583, p. 2053.

Harpsfield was committed to the Fleet after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richard Thornden

(d. 1558)

Suffragan Bishop of Dover (1545-1558) [ODNB]

Richard Thornden is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

On 13 June 1555 John Bland was brought before Thornden. 1563, p. 1229, 1570, pp. 1851-52, 1576, pp. 1585-86, 1583, p. 1672.

Bland asked that the bishop of Dover and Master Collins be present at the disputation over the sacrament between Harspfield and Bland. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

On 20 June, Bland was reexamined, his articles read by the bishop of Dover and Bland's answers made. 1563, p. 1229.

Bland referred to Thornden's library as a source for texts for any discussion of scripture. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Thornden stated that Bland had preached many heresies. Faucet wais present during this discussion. 1563, p. 1225, 1570, p. 1849, 1576, p. 1582, 1583, p. 1670.

Bland asked that Richard Thornden, bishop of Dover, and Robert Collins, commissary, be present at the disputation over the sacrament between Nicholas Harspfield and Bland. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Cyriac Pettit was present during the disputation between Bland and Nicholas Harpsfield on 21 May 1555. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

On 28 May Nicholas Harpsfield had the mayor's sergeant bring Bland and Master Collins (comissary) before him, in Thornden's house. 1563, pp. 1220-21, 1570, pp. 1845-46, 1576, pp. 1579-80, 1583, p. 1667.

On 13 June [1555] Bland was brought before Richard Thornden, Robert Collins and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1229, 1570, pp. 1851-52, 1576, pp. 1585-86, 1583, p. 1672.

Thornden asked Bland if he knew of Oecolompadius and Zwingli, to which Bland responded that he had seen 'parte of their doinges'. 1563, p. 1226, 1570, p. 1850, 1576, p. 1583, 1583, p. 1671.

On 20 June Bland was reexamined and his articles read by Richard Thornden. Bland's answers were made and condemnation given. 1563, pp. 1229-30, 1570, p. 1852, 1576, p. 1582, 1583, pp. 1672-73.

Bland was condemned by Dover. 1563, p. 1230, 1570, p. 1852, 1576, p. 1582, 1583, pp. 1672-73.

Bland, Sheterden and Middleton were condemned on 25 June 1555. 1570, p. 1856, 1576, p. 1588, 1583, pp. 1675-76.

He examined and condemned John Frankesh. 1570, p. 1856, 1576, p. 1588, 1583, pp. 1675-76.

He examined and condemned Humphrey Middleton. 1570, p. 1856, 1576, p. 1588, 1583, pp. 1675-76.

He took part in the last examination of Nicholas Sheterden and condemned him on 25 June 1555. 1570, p. 1856, 1576, p. 1588, 1583, pp. 1675-76.

Thornden examined and condemned William Cokar. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

He examined Richard Colliar. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

He condemned Colliar on either 26 June, 26 July (1570, p. 1859,1576, p. 1591, 1583, p. 1678) or16 August 1555 (1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688).

He examined and condemned William Hopper. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

He condemned Hopper on 26 June or 26 July 1555 (1570, p. 1859,1576, p. 1591, 1583, p. 1678) or 16 July 1555 (1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688).

He examined and condemned Henry Laurence. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

He condemned Laurence on 26 June or 26 July (1570, p. 1859,1576, p. 1591, 1583, p. 1678) or 2 August 1555 (1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688).

He examined and condemned William Sterne. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688.

Thornden was referred to by William Sterne as 'Dick of Dover'. 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688.

Thornden examined and condemned Richard Wright. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

George Catmer, Robert Streater, George Brodbridge, Anthony Burwarde and James Tutty, martyrs, were examined by the bishop of Dover. 1563, p. 1273, 1570, p. 1884, 1576, p. 1613, 1583, p. 1707.

John Web was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden. 1563, pp. 1386-87, 1570, pp. 1959-60, 1576, p. 1687, 1583, p. 1794.

A mass was said at Canterbury by Thornden after the death of Edward VI. 1563, p. 1474 [recte 1472], 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1871.

John Newman was apprehended in Kent and examined there by Thornden and others at Tenterden. 1570, p. 2134, 1576, p. 1856, 1583, pp. 1686-87, p. 1950.

Newman was brought before Bonner and condemned with Denley and Packingham. Newman wrote a letter to Thornden about his conduct and doctrine. 1570, p. 2134, 1576, p. 1856, 1583, p. 1950.

Thornden is described as a great persecutor. 1563, p. 1546, 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1954.

Thornden condemned John Philpot of Tenterden, William Hay of Hythe, Thomas Hudson of Selling, Matthew Bradbridge of Tenterden, Thomas Stephens of Biddenden, Nicholas Final of Tenterden, William Lowick of Cranbrooke, and William Prowting of Thornham. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].]

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Joan Bradbridge, Walter Apelbye of Maidstone, Petronyll, his wife, Edmund Allin of Frittenden, Katherine,his wife, Joan Mannings, wife of Maidstone, Elizabeth, a blind maiden were all examined by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1570, 1570, p. 2161, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1976.

Edward Benden petitioned the wealthy men of Staplehurst to write to Thornden, bishop of Dover, asking that his wife, Alice Benden, be released. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

Benden told Thornden that his wife was being manipulated by her brother, Roger Hall, who gave her money, comforted her, and persuaded her not to attend mass. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

Benden told Thornden that she would not be shriven by her parish priest if sent home. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

Thornden released her, telling her to go to church 'when thou wilt'. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

Thornden sent Alice Benden to 'Monday's Hole' prison. Her brother had great difficulty in finding where she was imprisoned but eventually found her five weeks after she had been moved. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

On 25 March 1557 Alice Benden was called before Thornden, who asked her to relent. She refused, telling him that his treatment of her was not of God. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

Thornden sent her to Westgate, where she was cleaned up, but her skin was so poor and her body so weak, that she could hardly walk and her skin peeled away. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

She remained at Westgate until the end of April, when she was brought before Thornden and condemned. She was then sent to the Castle. 1570, p. 2168, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1981.

Martin Bradbridge was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Nicholas Final was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Hay was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Thomas Hudson was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Stephen Kempe was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Lowick was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 2155, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

John Philpot of Tenterden was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Matthew Plaise was examined by Thornden, Nicholas Harpsfield and Collins. 1570, pp. 2169-71, 1576, pp. 1873-75, 1583, pp. 1982-83.

William Prowting was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Thomas Stephens was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Waterman was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Joan Bradbridge had two children, Patience and Charity. She asked Thornden to protect them after her death but he refused. 1570, p. 2169, 1576, p. 1873, 1583, p. 1981.

Thornden was taken with a palsy whilst watching a game of bowls at Bourne. 1563, p. 1706, 1570, p. 2298, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

Thornden died in the pulpit after giving pardon and remission of sins to his congregation. 1563, p. 1705.

[Referred to as 'Thorton' and 'Dick of Dover'.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Robert Collins

Commissary of Canterbury diocese. [BCL 1522 Foster

Foxe states that Collins was the cardinal's factor before coming to England 1563, p. 1229, 1570, pp. 1851-52, 1576, pp. 1585-86, 1583, p. 1672.

Robert Collins demanded that Bland return the following day but Bland did not appear, due to urgent business. Bland wrote a letter regarding this. 1563, p. 1223, 1570, p. 1847, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Bland asked that Richard Thornden, bishop of Dover, and Robert Collins, commissary, be present at the disputation over the sacrament between Nicholas Harspfield and Bland. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

On 28 May Nicholas Harpsfield had the mayor's sergeant bring John Bland before him, and Robert Collins, in Thornden's house. Foxe reports the talk between Harspfield, Collins and Bland. 1563, pp. 1220-21, 1570, pp. 1845-46, 1576, pp. 1579-80, 1583, p. 1667.

Around 28 June Bland returned to Collins, where he proceeded against Bland before Master Cockes of Sturray and Markes the apparitor. 1563, p. 1223, 1570, p. 1847, 1576, p. 1581, 1583, p. 1668.

Bland remained in the castle of Canterbury until 2 March, when he was taken to the chapter house of Christ Church (Canterbury), to the suffragen of Canterbury, Master Collins, Master Mylles and others, then to Master Oxenden, Master Petit, Master Webbe and Master Hardes (these were all justices). 1563, p. 1224, 1570, p. 1848, 1576, p. 1581, 1583, p. 1669.

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Bland and Collins argued over abiding by the laws of the realm and of the sacrament. 1563, pp. 1224-25, 1570, p. 1849, 1576, pp. 1582-83, 1583, pp. 1669-70.

Nicholas Sheterden discussed eucharistic doctrine with the archdeacon Nicholas Harpsfield and Robert Collins. 1563, pp. 1231-32, 1570, p. 1853, 1576, pp. 1585-86, 1583, pp. 1673-74.

William Cokar was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Richard Colliar was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Anthony Burwarde was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden, 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

William Hopper was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Henry Lawrence was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

William Sterne was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688.

John Newman was examined before Thornden, Collins and others. 1583, pp. 1686-87.

Richard Wright was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Thornden, bishop of Dover, Faucet and Robert Collins; he answered and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Collins took part in the examination of John Lomas, Agnes Snotten, Anne Albright, Joan Sole, and Joan Catmer. 1563, p. 1470, 1570, p. 2032, 1576, p. 1751, 1583, p. 1859.

John Newman was examined by Thornden and others, among whom was Robert Collins. 1570, pp. 2134-35, 1576, pp. 1856-57, 1583, pp. 1950-51.

Talk took place between Sir John Baker, Collins and Edmund Allin. 1570, pp. 2165-66, 1576, pp. 1870-71, 1583, pp. 1979-80.

Matthew Plaise was examined by Thornden, Nicholas Harpsfield and Collins. 1570, pp. 2169-71, 1576, pp. 1873-75, 1583, pp. 1982-83.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Ashford
Ashford, Ashforde
NGR: TR 010 428

A parish in the hundred of Chart and Longbridge, lathe of Scray, county of Kent. 20 miles south-east by east from Maidstone. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Canterbury.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Stone [Stone in Oxney]
NGR: TQ 940 276

A parish in the hundred of Oxney, lathe of Shepway, county of Kent. 6.5 miles south-east from Tenterden. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Canterbury.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2006 [1982]

Q. Mary. The examination and answeres of Mathew Plaise.

MarginaliaAnno 1557. Iune.keepe Pacience and Charitie, meaning her two children. MarginaliaThe Bishop will neither keepe Patience nor Charitye.Nay, quoth the Bishop, by the faith of my bodye, I will meddle with neither of them both.

The troubles and examinations of Mathew Plase. 
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Matthew Plaise

Plaise is not mentioned in the 1563 edition. The only information which Foxe ever had about him was a copy of his account of his examinations which Foxe first printed in the 1570 edition.

VNto these holy martyrs of Kent aboue specified, wher of seuen suffered at Maidstone, and seuen at Canterb. I thought not vnmeete heere also to be adioyned the examination of MarginaliaMathew Plase.Mathew Plase, a Weauer of the same Countie of Kent, and a faithful christian. Who being apprehended and imprisoned likewise for the testimonie of a good conscience, in the Castell of Canterbury, was brought to examination before the Bishop of Douer, and Harpsfield the Archdeacon, as here is to be red and seene.

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The examination and answeres of Mathewe Plase Weauer, of the Parish of Stone in the Countie of Kent, before Thornton Bishop of Douer, Harpesfield Archdeacon, Collins Commissarie, & other Inquisitours. An. 1557.

MarginaliaExaminatiō of Mathew Plase before the B. of Douer, Harpsfield Archdeacon and Collins Commissary. &c.FIrst when I came before the bishop, he asked me whether I were not of that Dioces, and where I dwelt, for that was my first Article.

Ans. I aunsweared, I was of the Parishe of Stone in Kent, and subiect vnto the King & Queene of England.

Bish. Then he sayd, I was indicted by xij. men, at Ashford at the Sessions, for heresie.

Auns. I sayd, that was sooner sayd then prooued.

Bish. Then he sayde, it was the truthe that he had spoken to me, for he had whereby to prooue it.

Auns. Then I desired him to let me heare it, and I would answere to it.

Bish. But he sayd he would not so do, but I should aunswere to my Article, yea or nay.

Auns. I said, he could not: for I was not at Ashforde, and therfore he had nothing to lay to my charge. But nowe I perceiue you goe about to lay a net to haue my bloud.

Arch. After many woordes betwixt the bishop and me, the Archdeacon said: peace, peace, we do not desire thy bloud, but we are glad to heare that thou art no hereticke, wyth many flattering woordes, and said: yet I was suspected of heresie, and if I woulde be content to confesse howe I did beleeue as concerning those Articles, they woulde gladly teache me.

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Auns. But I sayd, I did not so thinke, for I talked wyth one of your doctors, and after long talke, he would nedes know how I did beleeue in the Sacrament, and I recited vnto him the text, and because I would not make him an exposition, he would teach me nothing: yet I praied hym for my learning to wryte his minde, & if it were the truth, I would beleeue him: and this I did desire him for þe loue of God, but it would not be.

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Arch. Then sayd he, it was not so, he durst sweare vpon a booke.

Auns. I sayd, it would be so prooued.

Arch. Then he stoode vp with a long processe, and sayd: he would tell me the truth, and was sure that the same Doctour did beleeue as he did.

Auns. I asked him how he knew that, seing S. Paul doth say, that no man knoweth what is in man but the spirite which dwelleth in him: but if you wist what Christ meant by these woords, MarginaliaOse. 6. Math. 12.I require mercy and not sacrifice, you wold not kill innocents.

Bishop. The Bishop began with me againe, and charged me in the king and Queenes name, and the Lord Cardinals, to answere yea or nay, to the Articles that followed.

Auns. Then I commanded him in his name that should come in flaming fire with his mighty Aungels to render vengeance to the disobedient, and to all those that beleued not the gospell of our Lord Iesus Christ, which should be punished with euerlasting damnation, þt he should speake nothing but the truth grounded vpon Christ and hys Apostles, and then I would answer him, or els not.

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Bish. Then he was very angry, and sayd: if I would not answer he would condemne me in dede: vnlesse I would answer euery Article.

Auns. Wel said I, if you do, you shalbe giltie of my bloud, and prooue your selfe a murtherer.

Arch. Then the archdeacon tooke the articles in his hand, & red the seconde Article, which was, that I was a Christian man, and did beleeue in theyr mother MarginaliaThe Catholick church.the Catholicke church, and the determination thereof.

Auns. I sayd, I was a Christian man in deede, and therefore they had nothing against me.

Arch. Thē said he, what saiest thou to þe catholicke church,

which hath so long cōtinued, except it were 9. or 10. yeres, that this heresie hath sprong vp here in this realme.

Auns. I sayde, no man can accuse me of any thing spoken against the catholicke church of Christ.

Bish. Then saide þe bish. doest thou not beleue the Creede?

Ans. Yes verely I beleue my Creede, & all that is written in the Testamēt of Christ, with the rest of the Scriptures.

Bish. Then sayth he: thou doest confesse that there is a Catholicke church, I am glad of that: but tell me, MarginaliaThis article of the K. & Quene is no article of his Catholicke Creede.is the King and Queene of that Church or not?

Ans. Wel said I, now I perceiue, you go about to be both mine accuser, & also my iudge, contrary to all right. MarginaliaAnd yet he sayd before that he went not aboute to seeke his bloud. I confesse Christ hath a Church vpon earth, which is built vpon the Apostles & Prophets, Christ being the head therof, and as touching the King and Quene, I answere, I haue nothing to do with no mās faith but with my owne: neither came I hether to iudge, for I iudge not my selfe, but the Lord must iudge me.

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Bishop. Then sayd he: Is there no part of that church here in England?

Auns. Well I perceiue, you would faine haue some thing to lay to my charge. I will tell you where. Christ sayeth, whereas two or three be gathered together in his name, there is he in the middest among them.

Then the archdeacon stoode vp with his mockes, to put me out of comfort, & said to the people: MarginaliaIudgement without truth.that I had no wit, but þt I thought all they were deceiued so long time, and that halfe a dosen of vs should haue the truth in a corner, & that al they should be deceiued, with such like taunts and mockes: but would not suffer me to speake one woord.

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Arch. Then he red the Article of the Sacrament, and said, I did denie the reall presence to be in the Sacrament after it was once consecrated, and that I sayde, Christes body was in heauen & no where els, and that the bread was nothing but a signe, token, or remembrance.

Ans. Then I said: you haue to shew where and what my woordes were: and heereof we talked a great while.

Bish. At the last the bishop was so angrie, that he charged me in the Kinges, Queenes, and Cardinals name before the Maior and his brethren, taking them to witnesse, if I did not say yea or nay, he would condemne me.

Ans. Then I saide: seeing you haue nothing to accuse me of, wherefore should I so answer?

Arch. Then the archd. said, I was gilty: and sayd I was like a thefe at the barre, which would not cōfesse his fault because his accusers were not present: with a great many wordes, & would not let me open my mouth against him.

Ans. Then I sawe where about they went, graunting to answere them by the woorde, or els I thinke they woulde haue cōdemned me for holding of my peace: and this was my beginning: MarginaliaMathew Plaise confesseth his minde of the Sacrament.I beleue that Christ tooke bread, and when he had geuen thankes, he brake it, and gaue it to his disciples, and sayde: Take, eate, this is my body which is geuen for you, this doe in remembrance of me.

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Arch. Doest thou beleeue þt Christ meant euen as he sayd?

Ans. I sayd, Christ was no dissembler, but he spake the very truthe.

Arch. Thou hast very well sayd: we will make the best of thy words. Then he praised me with many words, going about to prooue it his body reall and substantiall, and said: Christ called himself bread: and this to proue, when Christ saide. This is my body: the breade was his body, saide he, in dede, real & substantial, not so long & so big as it hong on þe Crosse, as the MarginaliaCapernaicall doctrine.Capernaites did thinke: but we eate it, as mās weake nature can eate Christ. Therfore when he sayd: This is my body, the bread was his body in very dede.

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Ans. Then I asked him, what Christ meant by these wordes. Which is geuen for you?

Arch. He saide: Christ spake that by the bread also, but it was not written in Mathew, but Luke had those words.

Ans. Then I asked him, if Christes bodye were made of bread, that was geuē for our redemption, or whether the bread was crucified for vs, or not?

Arch. Then he sayd: no by saint Mary, I say not so.

Ans. You haue said the truth in dede, & euen as I beleue.

Arch. Then he stoode vp with a great many of words, and sayd: that I did think it but bare bread stil, as other bread is: but he was sure MarginaliaChrist called it his body: Ergo, he made it his body. MarginaliaIt followeth not: For a thing may be called, & yet no nature chaunged.Christe called it his body, and then it was his body in deede, for he would beleeue Christ.

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Ans. When he had spoken his pleasure by me, thinking to haue condēned me by their law, I said: he had not iudged right of mee, for I hadde not so spoken, but did beleue the wordes of Christ as well as he, and as much as he coulde prooue by the woorde.

Arch. Then he would heare what I did say it was.

Ans. I said, I did beleeue it was that he gaue them.

Arch. Then he asked me, what it was that he gaue them.

Auns. I sayd, that which he brake.

Arch.
OOOOo.iij.
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