Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageLatin/Greek Translations
Names and Places on this Page
James GageSir Edward GageDoverPortsmouth
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
James Gage

Brother of Sir Edward Gage.

Woodman's neighbours were Cardillar and James Gage. 1563, p. 1574, 1570, p. 2171, 1576, p. 1875, 1583, p. 1984.

Woodman's third examination took place before Alban Langdale and Master James Gage at Montague's house, beside St Mary Overy's, Southwark, on 12 May 1557. 1570, pp. 2182-88, 1576, pp. 1884-89, 1583, pp. 1992-97.

[Son of John Gage.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Edward Gage

Sheriff of Sussex and Surrey (1556 -1557). Brother of James Gage.

Edward Gage apprehended Derick Carver, Thomas Iveson, William Veisy, and John Launder at prayer in Carver's house during late October 1554. 1563, p. 1239. 1570, p. 1860, 1576, p. 1592, 1583, p. 1680.

Sir Edward Gage sent his men to arrest Richard Woodman in Warbleton, Sussex. 1570, pp. 2171, 2188, 1576, pp. 1875, 1889, 1583, pp. 1983-84, 1997.

John Trew was persecuted by Sir Edward Gage and imprisoned, pilloried and had his ears cut off. 1563, p. 1681.

[Son of John Gage.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Dover
Douer
NGR: TR 320 414

One of the Cinq Ports, a borough and a market town, having separate jurisdiction; locally in the Lathe of St Augustine, eastern division of the County of Kent. 16 miles south east by south from Canterbury. Dover formerly consisted of the parishes of St James the Apostle, St John, St Martin the Greater, St Martin the Less, St Mary the Virgin, St Nicholas and St Peter - all subsequently merged into St James and St Mary. The living of St Mary is a perpetual curacy in the peculiar jurisdiction of the Archbishop of Canterbury, and in the patronage of the parishioners. The living of St James is a discharged rectory in the jurisdiction and patronage of the Archbishop

[Back to Top]

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

[Back to Top]
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Portsmouth
Portesmouth
NGR: SU 655 010

A seaport, borough, market town and parish, having separate jurisdiction. Locally in the hundred of Portsdown, Portsdown division of the county of Hampshire. 18 miles southeast by east from Southampton. A principal naval and military base. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Winchester. There is also a garrison chapel

[Back to Top]

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

[Back to Top]
2009 [1985]

Queene Mary. The apprehension and taking of Richard Woodman, Martyr.

MarginaliaAnno 1557. Iune.go with you (said I) vnlesse you will cary me by force, and if you will do so, at your owne aduentures. MarginaliaWoodman refuseth to goe with them vnlesse they shewe their warrant.And so I rose from the boord and stepped into my chamber, meanyng to goe from them if I could possible, seeyng God had made the way so open for me. I ment to play Peters part with them, but God would not it should be so, but sent a feare amongst them, that as soone as I was gone into my chāber, ere euer I could come out againe, they were gone out of my house.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaGods great worke, how the persecurors which came to take Woodman, went away without him.When I saw that, I knew it was Gods doyng to set me at liberty once againe. Yet I was compelled to speake to them, and said: If you haue a warrant, I desire you for Gods sake to shew it me, and I wil go with you, with all my hart: if not, I desire you to depart in Gods peace and the kings: for surely I will not go with you without the order of the law: for I haue bene too simple in such things already. For before I was sent to prison first, I went to the Iustices to two Sessions, without any warrant or cōmandement, but had word by one of their men, & I went gently to them, & they sent me to prison, and kept me there almost a yere and thre quarters, without all right or equitie, as it is openly known, not hearing my cause iustly debated. And it semeth to me that I should be thus euil hādled, and therefore I will not go to none of them all henceforth without the extremitie of the law.

[Back to Top]

Then one of them answered me, and said: we haue not the warrant here, but it is at home at my house: the worst is you can but make vs fetch it. Then I said: Fetch it, if you wil, but if you come in my house before you haue it, at your owne aduenture. MarginaliaWoodman escapeth the handes of his takers.So I shut my doore, and went my way out of the other doore. So they got helpe to watch my house, while one of them fet the Constable and many moe, thinking to haue had me in my house, and to haue takē me in my house, & caried me away with a licence: but I was gone before as god would haue it. MarginaliaWoodmans house agayne searched for him,Notwithstanding they sought euery corner of my house, but could not preuaile, I mistrusted they would search it again that night, and kept me abroad, and in deed there came seuen of his men & the Constable, and searched my house.

[Back to Top]

And when they sawe that they could not meete wt me, they were redy to rent their coats, that I had scaped them so, knowing they should haue such a checke of their maister. When I heard that they had sought so for me againe, I perceiuyng that they were greedy of their pray, came home, and my wyfe told me all thyngs.

[Back to Top]

Then I supposed that they would lay all the countrey for me, and the sea coast, because I should not go ouer, and thē I thought that they would not mistrust that I would dare bee nigh home. So I tolde my wyfe that I woulde make my lodgyng in a woode not past a flight shotte from my house, as I did in deede, MarginaliaWoodman lodged sixe weekes in a woode.euen vnder a tree, and there had my Bible, my penne and myne inke, and other necessaries, and there continued a sixe or seuen weekes, my wife bringing me meate daily as I had neede. Yea I thought my selfe blessed of God, that I was counted worthy to lye in the woodes for the name of Christ. Then there came word into the countrey, that I was seene and spoken too in Flaunders: whereupon they left laying awaite for me for MarginaliaAll the country and Sea coastes layd for woodman.they had layd all the Countrey for me, and the sea coast from Portesmouth to Douer, euē as God put in my mind they would.

[Back to Top]

So when all was husht, I went abroad among our friends & brethren, and at length I went beyond the Sea both into Flanders and in Fraunce: but I thought euery day seuen yere or euer I were at home agayne. So I came home againe as soone as it was possible. I was there but three weeks, but as soone as I was come home, and it once knowen among Baals priests, they could not abide it, but procured out warrantes agaynst me, causing my house to bee searched sometymes twise in a weeke. This continued from Saint Iames tide to the first Sonday in Lent. Otherwhile I went priuily, otherwhile openly, otherwhile I went from home a fortnight or three weeks, otherwhile I was at home a month or fiue weekes together, liuing there most commonly and openly, doing such woorkes as I had to doe: and yet all mine enemies coulde lay no hands on me, till the houre was ful come: and then by the voice of the country, and by manifest proofes, MarginaliaWoodman deliuered by his owne brother into his enemyes handes.mine owne brother as concerning the flesh, deliuered mee into theyr hands, by that he knew that I was at home.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaAuri sacra fames quid non Mortalia cogis pectora? Virgil. 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Foxe marginal note, citing Virgil, Aeneid, 3. 56-7.
Foxe text Latin

Auri sacra fames quid non Mortalia cogis pectora.

Foxe text translation

Not translated.

Translation (Wade 2004)

Why, sacred longing for gold, do you not constrain the hearts of men?

Actual text of Virgil, Aeneid, 3. 57-8


quid non mortalia pectora cogis,
auri sacra fames!

[Accurate citation of words, line order reversed, but note that the citation is repeated with the correct word order at Page 2009, Column 2, Marginal Note]

For my father & he had as much of my goodes in theyr hands, as I might haue 56. pound for by the yeare cleare, and therunto praied. It was a Lordship and a honor, and halfe a honor that I had deliuered into their hands, to pay my debts, and the rest to remaine to my wife and childrē. But they had reported that it woulde not pay my debtes: which grieued me sore. For it was two hundred pounds better then the debtes came to. Which cause me to speake

[Back to Top]

to some of my frendes, that they would speake to them to come to some reckening with me, and to take all such money againe of me, as they were charged with, and to deliuer me such wrytings and wryts, as they had of mine, againe, or to whom I would appoynt them.

So it was agreed betwixt my Father and mee, that I should haue it againe, and the day was apoynted, that the reckening shoulde be made and sent to me that same daye that I was taken, my brother supposing that I shoulde haue put him out of most of al his occupying, that he was in: for it was all mine in a manner that he occupied, as all the countrey can and doe well knowe. MarginaliaBrother bewrayeth the brother.Whereon (as it is reported) he told one Gradillar my next neighbor, and he told some of M. Gages men, or to M. Gage himselfe: and so he sent to his brother, and hys brother sent 12. of his mē (he being Sheriffe) in the night before I was taken, and laye in the bushes not farre from my house, till about 9. of the clocke, euen the houre that was appoynted amongest themselues: for about the same time they thought to haue had me within my house.

[Back to Top]

They had taken a man of mine and two of my childrē that were abroad in the land: and kept them with them til theyr houre was appoynted to come in, & then a litle girle one of my children, saw them come together, & came running in, & cried: mother, mother, yonder cōmeth 20. men. I sitting in my bedde and making of shoe thonges, heard the woordes, and suspecting straight way that I was betrayed, I stirred out of my bed & whipt on my hose, thinking to haue gone out of the doores or euer they had bene come. My wife being amased at the childes words, looked out at the doore, and they were hard by. Then she clapped to the doore and barred it fast, euen as I came oute of my chamber into the Hall, and so barred the other: MarginaliaWoodmans house agayne beset, and searched.So the house was beset round straightway, and they badde open the doores, or els they would breake them in peces. Then I had no shift, but either I must shew my selfe openly, or make some other remedy.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaWoodman put to his shiftes.So there was a place in my house þt was neuer found which was at the lest, I dare say 20. times, and somtimes almost of 20. men searched at once, both by night & by day. Into which place I went: And assoone as I was in, my wife opened the doore: wherby incontinent they came, and asked for me: and MarginaliaThe part of a trusty wife to her husband.she sayd I was not at home. Then they asked her wherefore shee shutte the dore, if I were not at home. Shee sayd, because shee had bene made afrayde diuers times, with such as came to search vs, and therefore shee shut the doore. For it is reported (sayth she) that who soeuer can take my husband, shall hang him or burne him strait way: and therfore I doubt they will serue me or my children so: for I thinke they may doe so vnto vs as well as to him, shee sayd. Well, sayd they, we know he is in the house, and we must searche it, for we be the sheriffes men: let vs haue a candle. It is tolde vs, there be many secrete places in your house. So shee lighted a candle, & they sought vp and downe in euery corner that they coulde finde, and had geuen ouer, and many of them were gone out of my house into the churchyard, and were talking with my father, and with some that he had brought with him.

[Back to Top]

Now when they could not find me, one of them MarginaliaThis belyke was his brother. went to him þt gaue them word that I was at home, and sayde, we can not finde him. Then hee asked them whether they had soughte ouer a windowe that was in the Hall (as it was knowen afterwarde) for that same place I had tolde hym of my selfe. For many times when I came home, I would send for him to beare me company: yet as it chanced I had not tolde him the way into it. Then they began to searche a newe. One looked vp ouer the windowe, and spied a little loft, with three or foure chestes, and the waye went in betwixt two of the chestes, but there could no mā perceiue it. Then hee asked my wife which was the way into it. Here is a place that we haue not sought yet. Then she thought they wold see it by one meanes or other. She sayde, the way was into it out of a chamber they were in euen now. So shee sent them vp, and cried, Away, away. Then I knewe there was no remedye, but make the best shift for my selfe that I could. The place was boarded ouer and fast nailed, and if I had come out that way that I went in, I must needes come amongst them al in the hall. MarginaliaWoodman at length after long seeking found out.Then I had no shift, but set my shoulders to the boardes that were nailed to the rafters to keepe out the raine, and brake them in peeces, which made a great noyse, and they that were in the other chamber, seeking for the waye into it, heard the noise, and looked out of a window, and spyed me, and made an outcry. But yet I gotte oute, and leaped downe, hauing no shoes on.

[Back to Top]

So I tooke downe a lane that was ful of sharp synders, and they came running after, with a great crie, with theyr swordes drawne, crying, Strike him, strike hym.

Which
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield