Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Anthony Brown

(1509/10 - 1567)

JP, MP for Lostwithel (1545), Great Bedwyn (1547), Preston (1553), Scarborough (1554), Maldon (1554). Sergeant-at-law and Mary's sergeant (1555). Chief Justice of the Common Pleas (1558 - 1559) and Justice of the Common Pleas (1559 - 1567). A leading early Elizabethan recusant [Bindoff, Commons, sub 'Browne, Anthony II'; DNB].

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Sir Anthony Browne was instructed, in a letter of 19 August, to imprison those who criticised the 'Queenes order of religion' or did not attend mass and to report their names to the privy council. 1583, p. 1765. [Foxe's account was taken from APC V, p. 63, but Foxe misdated the incident to 1553; the Privy Council Register says 1554].

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He threatened to send William Hunter's father to prison if William did not surrender himself. He interrogated William Hunter, became enraged with Hunter and sent Hunter to Bishop Bonner. 1570, pp. 1713-14; 1576, pp. 1462-63; 1583, pp. 1536-37.

He complained about the lack of wood at William Hunter's execution. He told Hunter that he would no more pray for him than for a dog. 1570, p. 1715; 1576, p. 1464; 1583, p. 1538.

He had Robert Hunter imprisoned in the stocks and then interrogated. 1570, p. 1716; 1576, p. 1465; 1583, p. 1539.

He was one of the commissioners who examined Thomas Wattes on 26 April 1555. He sent him to Bishop Bonner on 27 April to be tried for heresy. 1563, pp. 1162-63 and 1165-66; 1570, pp. 1769-70; 1576, p. 1511; 1583, pp. 1594-95

He was present at the execution of Thomas Higbed. 1570, p. 1720; 1576, p. 1469; 1583, p. 1542.

Anthony Brown persecuted George Eagles. 1570, p. 2204, 1576, p. 1902, 1583, p. 2010.

Rumours were raised in Chelmsford that Justice Brown had falsely accused diverse honest men who had kept Eagles safe in their houses, in order to discredit Eagles. Someone named Reynold of Chelmsford witnessed this to be false report. 1570, p. 2204, 1576, p. 1902, 1583, p. 2010.

Sir Anthony Hungerford sought the advice of justice Brown on how he should act towards Richard White and John Hunt. 1563, p. 1702, 1570, p. 2256, 1576, p. 1948, 1583, p. 2055.

[NB: Anthony Browne named Sir Edward Saunders as one of the overseers of his will (Bindoff, Commons).]

[Not to be confused with Anthony Brown of Sussex.]

 
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Michael Dunning

Chancellor of Norwich (1554 - 1558?) [Fasti; DCL, 1555; Venn]

Michael Dunning is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

Robert Samuel was cruelly treated by Dr Hopton, bishop of Norwich, and/or Dr Dunnings, the chancellor [Foxe is not sure]. 1563, p. 1270, 1570, p. 1898, 1576, p. 1609, 1583, p. 1703.

Thomas Cobbe was examined by Dunning but condemned by the bishop of Norwich with Roger Coo, William Allen, James Abbes, and Robert Samuel. He was burned at Thetford in September 1556. 1563, p. 1271, 1570, p. 1884, 1576, pp. 1613-14 , 1583, p. 1708.

Dunning made a visitation to Ipswich in 1556. He examined Peter and Anne Moone. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

He interrupted the examination of Peter Moone and his wife to tell Hopton that several prisoners (whom he described as 'heretics and Anabaptists') had been brought from Boxford, Lavenham, and the cloth country.1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

As they went to leave after their examination, Dunning told Peter Moone and his wife that they had to see him, for he was sure that they were heretics. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

Edmund Poole was examined by Dunning, chancellor of Norwich, and Mings, the registrar of the town of Beccles.1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

Hopton and Dunning left Ipswich without reexamining Anne and Peter Moone. 1570, p. 2126, 1576, p. 1847, 1583, p. 1942.

After Thomas Spicer was examined and condemned by Dunning he was handed over to Sir John Silliard. 1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

John Denny was examined by Dunning, chancellor of Norwich, and Mings, the registrar of the town of Beccles.1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

A papist brought Simon Miller before Dunning, who spoke with him and then committed him to ward. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

During his examination, Miller's confession was discovered hidden in his shoe. Miller reaffirmed his confession before Dunning. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896, 1583, p. 2005.

Crashfield was first examined by Dunning. 1563, p. 1616, 1570, p. 2204, 1576, p. 1902, 1583, p. 2010.

Crashfield was again examined by Dunning and Brydges, at which time he was asked to speak with Dr Pore. 1563, p. 1617, 1570, p. 2205, 1576, p. 1903, 1583, p. 2011.

Crashfield was condemned by Dunning. 1563, p. 1617, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1903, 1583, p. 2011.

On 23 July 1557 Cicely Ormes was called before Dunning and Brydges, at which time she was condemned. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2023.

Ormes wrote to Dunning about her recantation. 1563, p. 1618, 1570, p. 2219, 1576, p. 1915, 1583, p. 2023.

Noyes was condemned by the bishop of Norwich before Dunning, Sir W. Woodhouse, Sir Thomas Woodhouse, George Heyden, Master Spense, W. Farrar (alderman), Master Thurston, Winesden and others. 1570, p. 2217, 1576, p. 1913, 1583, p. 2021.

Thomas Spurdance was examined before Michael Dunning, chancellor of Norwich. 1563, pp. 1634-36, 1570, pp. 2220-21, 1576, pp. 1916-17, 1583, p. 2024.

Michael Dunning died in Lincolnshire while sitting in a chair. . 1570, p. 2298, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2101.

 
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Mrs Swallow

Wife of William Swallow, bailiff of Chelmsford.

She married Swallow shortly after the death of George Eagles and was taken ill with the falling-sickness. 1570, p. 2204, 1576, p. 1902, 1583, p. 2010.

 
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Reynold

Of unknown occupation. Of Chelmsford.

Rumours were raised in Chelmsford that Justice Brown had falsely accused diverse honest men who had kept George Eagles safe in their houses, in order to discredit Eagles. Reynold of Chelmsford witnessed this to be false report. 1563, 1615, 1570, p. 2003, 1576, p. 1901, 1583, p. 2010.

 
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Richard Crashfield

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Tailor. Of Wymondham, Norfolk.

Crashfield wrote out his own account of his examinations. 1563, pp. 1616-17, 1570, pp. 2204-06., 1576, pp. 1902-03, 1583, pp. 1010-11.

Crashfield was first examined by Dunning. 1563, p. 1616, 1570, p. 2204, 1576, p. 1902, 1583, p. 2010.

Crashfield was examined by Dr Brydges. 1563, p. 1616, 1570, pp. 2204-05, 1576, pp. 1902-03., 1583, pp. 2010-11.

Crashfield was again examined by Dunning and Brydges, at which time he was asked to speak with Dr Pore. 1563, p. 1617, 1570, p. 2205, 1576, p. 1903, 1583, p. 2011.

Crashfield was condemned by Dunning. 1563, p. 1617, 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1903, 1583, p. 2011.

He was brought by the sheriffs and officers to his execution on 5 August 1557. 1570, p. 2206, 1576, p. 1903, 1583, p. 2011. [Note that 1563 (p. 1615) has the execution taking place on 15 March].

 
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Richard Potto

(d. 1558)

Inn-keeper of the Cock Inn, Chelmsford.

Richard Potto tried to persuade George Eagles to ask the queen's forgiveness. 1570, p. 2203, 1576, p. 1901, 1583, p. 2009.

When Eagles was on the ladder, Potto again troubled him, begging him to ask forgiveness, but the sheriff pushed him away. 1563, 1615, 1570, p. 2003, 1576, p. 1901, 1583, p. 2010.

After the death of George Eagles, Potto fell into dispute with some of his neighbours and then fell ill early in Elizabeth's reign. He lay in his bed, foaming at the mouth, unable to speak or comprehend anything for three or four days, after which he died. 1563, 1615, 1570, p. 2003, 2303, 1576, p. 1901, 1583, p. 2010.

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William Swallow

Bailiff of Chelmsford.

After his indictment, George Eagles was taken to the new inn, called the Crown, in Chelmsford, by William Swallow. 1570, p. 2203, 1576, p. 1901, 1583, p. 2009.

William Swallow, a bailiff of Chelmsford, took George Eagles to his place of execution on a sled, laid his neck across it, and proceeded to hack at Eagles with a blunt cleaver, hitting him many times on the shoulders, chin, mangling him, and then cut out his heart. Eagles' body was then quartered, his bowels burned, and the body parts put on fish-stalls before Swallow's door, until horses were ready to take the quarters away - one each to Colchester, Harwich, Chelmsford, and St Osyth's. His head was placed on a pole in Chelmsford market until the wind blew it down and eventually somebody buried in the churchyard at night. 1570, p. 2204, 1576, p. 1902, 1583, p. 2010.

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Swallow became ill after the death of Eagles. His hair fell out, his eyes closed so that he could hardly see, and his finger- and toe-nails fell off. 1570, p. 2204, 1576, p. 1902, 1583, p. 2010.

Swallow married shortly after the death of Eagles. His wife was taken ill with the falling-sickness. 1570, p. 2204, 1576, p. 1902, 1583, p. 2010.

Note that in 1563, p. 1704, the death of Swallow is referred to but his name is not given in the text. He is only described here as the 'bewrayer of George Eagles'.

 
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Harwich
Harwich
NGR: TM 260 325

A borough having separate jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Tendring, county of Essex. 42 miles north-east by east from Chelmsford. The borough comprises the parishes of Dovercourt and St. Nicholas, both in the Archdeaconry of Colchester and Diocese of London. The living of Dovercourt is a vicarage, with the perpetual curacy of St. Nicholas annexed to it.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Norwich
NGR: TG 230 070

A city and county of itself, locally in the hundred of Humbleyard, county of Norfolk, of which it is the capital. 108 miles north-east by north from London. The city comprises 33 parishes, and the liberty of the city a further four. Of these 37, three are rectories, 12 are discharged rectories, three are vicarages, one is a discharged vicarage, and 18 are perpetual curacies. St Andrew, St Helen, St James, St Paul and Lakenham are within the peculiar jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter; the rest are in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Norwich, of which the city is the seat.

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Further information:

Andrews church (now St Andrews Hall) is at the junction of St Andrews Street and Elm Hill.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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St. Rouses
S. Roufes, S. Rouses
NGR:

Unidentified

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Wymondham [Wimondham, Wymoundham]
NGR: TG 115 015

A parish in the hundred of Forhoe, county of Norfolk. 9 miles west-south-west from Norwich, comprising the market town of Wymondham, which forms the in-soken, and six divisions which form the out-soken. The living is a discharged vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Norfolk, diocese of Norwich, and in the patronage of the Bishop of Ely

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Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

The reason for the use of this work of reference is that it presents the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take this reference as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2034 [2010]

Queene Mary. the Martyrdome of George Eagles Martyr. Richard Crashfield.

MarginaliaAnno 1557. August.This thing done, he was caryed to the new Inne, called the signe of the Crowne in Chelmsforde, by the beastly Bayliffes, which some of them were they that before dyd the best to take him, and being in the Inne, one MarginaliaRichard Potto Inholder at the Cocke in Chelmsford.Richard Potto the elder, an Inholder, dwelling at the signe of the Cocke in the same towne, did muche trouble him in perswading him to cōfesse he had offended the Queene in his prayer which he was condemned for, and to aske her forgeuenes.

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To whome he sayd hee had not offended her Grace in that behalfe. So in processe of time he was layd vppon a Sled with an Hurdle on it, and drawne to the place of execution being fast bounde, hauing in his hand a Psalme booke, of the whiche he read very deuoutly all the way wt a loud voyce till he came there: and being on the Ladder, this foresayd Potto did much trouble him wt the matter aforesayd, when he would haue vttered other thinges, tyll such time as the Sheriffe commaunded Potto to hold his peace and trouble him no more.

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So he made his confession and stood very constant stil then he was turned of the ladder. With him were cast certayn theeues also, and þe next day when they wer brought out to be executed with him, there happened a thing that did much set forth and declare the innocency and godlines of this man. For being ledde betweene two theeues to the place where he should suffer, when as hee exhorted bothe them & all other, to stand steadfastly to the truth, one of these turned the counsel he gaue, into a iesting matter, and made but a floute of it.

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Why should we doubt to obtayne heauen, sayth he, for as much as this holy man shal go before vs, as captayne and leader vnto vs in the way. We shall flee thether strayt as soonr as he hath once made vs the entry.

In this, George Eagles and that other did greatly reproue him, who on þe other side gaue good heed to Georges exhortation, earnestly bewayling his owne wickednes, & calling to Christ for mercy. But the more that the first was bid to be still and to leaue off his scoffing, the more peruerse did he continue in hys foolishnes and his wicked behauiour. At length he came to the Gallowes, where they shoulde bee hanged, but George was caryed to an other place there by to suffer. Betweene the two it was þe godlyers chaunce to go the foremost, who beyng vpon þe ladder, after he had exhorted the people to beware and take heede to thēselues, how they did transgresse þe commaundementes of God, and then hadde committed his soule in to Gods handes, he ended his life after a godly and quyet maner.

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MarginaliaAn example to be noted of a thiefe reiecting and deriding wholesome and Godly preaching.The mockers turn commeth next, which would haue sayd likewise somewhat, but his tongue did so fumble and falter in his head, that hee was not able to speake a word. Fayne would he haue vttered his mind, but he coulde not bring it out. Then did the vnder Sheriffe bid him say the Lordes prayer, which he coulde not say neyther, but stutteringly, as a man would saye, one word to day, and an other to morowe. Then one did begin to say it, and so bad him say after. 

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 396, line 22

The Edition of 1563 goes on: "doyng by him as a man would use chyldren, whiche because they can not take meate themselves, chammeth it or it be put into their mouthes" (p. 1615).

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Such as were there and saw it, were very much astonyed: especially those that did beholde the iust punishment of God, agaynst him that had mocked so earnest a matter. George Eagles in the meane tyme, after hee had hanged a small time, hauing a great check with the halter, immediately one of the Bayliffes cut the halter a sunder, & hee fell to the ground being still aliue, although much amased wt the checke he had of the ladder.

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MarginaliaW. Swallow tormētour of George Eagles.The one William Swallow of Chelmsford a Bayliffe did draw him to the Sledde, þt he was drawn thether on, and layd his necke thereon, and with a Cleauer, such as is occupyed in many mens kitchins, and blunt, did hackle off his head, and sometime hit his necke, and sometyme his chinne, and did fowly māgle him, and so opened him. Notwithstanding this blessed Martyr of Christe abode steadfast and constant in the very midst of his tormentes, till such time as this tormentor William Swallowe dyd plucke the hart out of his body. The bodye being deuided in foure partes, and his bowels burnt, was brought to þe foresayd Swallowes dore, and there layd vppon the fishe stalles before his dore, till they had made ready a horse to cary his quarters, one to Colchester, and the reste to Harwich, Chelmsford and S. Rouses. 

Commentary  *  Close

Compare the accounts of the treatment of Eagles' corpse in the 1563 and 1570 editions and note Foxe's concern to be as detailed as possible in describing the degradation, which increased the comparison of Eagles to that of Christ.

 
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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 396, line 13 from the bottom

{Cattley/Pratt alters 'S. Rouses' to 'St. Osyth's' in the text.} In the Latin this is "ad S. Roufium" or "Rousium" or "Roustum," for the type is not clear; in 1563 and 1570 "S. Roufes;" in 1576 and all following Editions "S. Rouses;" which is supposed to mean St. Osyth's on the coast of Essex. Addenda:The conjecture that St. Rouses means St. Osyth's is confirmed by a passage in Thomas Mountain's Autobiography: "This vyage [from Colchester to Holland] was tryshe [thrice] attemptyd and always was put bake; and at the laste tyme we were caste a land at sent towsys, wheras I durste not longe tary, bycawse of my lord Darsy, who laye there, havynge a strayte comysyon sent unto hym from quene Marye, to make dyllygent searche for one beynge callyd Trowge over the worlde, and for all souche lyke begars as he was." Mr. Nichols has misread it "sent Towhys" instead of "sent towsys." This colloquial form of "St. Osythe's" is obtained by repeating the final t of "sent" at the beginning of the next word: thus a few lines lower Mountain repeats n, "an noneste man." So, "Tooley Street" is an abbreviation or corruption of "Saint Ooley's or Olave's Street." "S. Rouses" was another colloquial form of "St. Osyth'e;" or Foxe may have mistaken the t in touses for an r, which Mountain's writing suggests as probable.

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His head was set vpp at Cbelmsforde on the Market Crosse on a long pole, and there stoode till the winde dyd blowe it downe, and lying certayne dayes in the streete tumbled about, one caused it to be buryed in the Churchyarde in the night. MarginaliaGods iust punishment vpon a cruell persecutor.Also a wonderfull work of God was it that he shewed on this wicked Bayliffe Swalow, who within short space after this was so punished, that all the heare went welnere of his head, hys eyes were as it were

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closed vp and could scant see, the nayles of his fingers and toes went cleane off. He was in such case of his bodye, as though he had bene a leper, and now in his last age almost a very begger, MarginaliaW. Swallowes wyfe punished with the falling sicknes.and his wife which he a little after maried God hath punished with the falling sickenes, or a disease like vnto that: which may be a warning or glasse for al mē and women to look in, that be enemies to Gods true seruauntes.

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MarginaliaGods iudgemēt vpon Richard Potto an other persecutor of George Eagles.No lesse token of his marueilous iudgement did God shewe vppon the foresayde Richard Potto, whiche did so much trouble this George Eagles in the Inne, and at the place of execution, as is aboue specified. He liued til the beginning of Queene Elizabethes raygne, al which time he little ioyed, & on a time being in a great chaufe wyth two or three of his neighbors in his own house, feeling himself not well, he said to one of hys seruantes: Goe with me in to the chamber & when hee came there, he fell downe on a low bed, as heauy as it had bene lead, & laye there fomyng at the mouth, & coulde neuer speake after, neyther yet vnderstand what was sayd to him, as by al meanes was tried by his neighbors with signes to him made, but laye as senceles as it had bene a very dumb beast, and within three or foure dayes dyed. God graunt that this token sente of God, with many moe like, may bee a warning to vs euer hereafter, while we shall liue vnto the worlds end.

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Besides this, God hathe wonderfully shewed hys worke. For at a time when they layd great wayte for thys George Eagles: so that it was thought that it was vnpossible but that he should be taken being so beset, his frends did put him in a Prentice apparill, that is to say, watchet hose,  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 397, line 12 from the bottom

Pale blue, according to Nares, under "Watchet." Chaucer writes, waget, and Skinner thinks it may be wad-chet, the colour of wad or woad. Fr. guesde.
"But he their sonne full fresh and jolly was
All deck'd in a robe of watchet hew."
Spencer, F. Q. v. can. 11, st. 27. Richardson's Dict.

as their maner is, and an old cloke, and set him on a packe of woll, as though he had ridden to carry woll to þe spinners, so he rode amongst the midst of his aduersaries and escaped them al for that time. An other troubler of the sayd George Eagles was also Iustice Browne, who enioyed not his cruelty many yeares after. &c.

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Also when hee was at the Sessions at Chelmsforde, there was a rumor raysed that hee had accused diuers honest men that dyd keepe him in theyr houses, and was conuersaunt with him, and all to discredite him, which rumor was very false and vtterly vntrue. Witnes one Reynold, with diuers other dwelling in Chelmsford.

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¶ The martirdome and examination of Richard Crashfield of Wymoundham, condemned to death for the testimonye of Iesus Christ. 
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Richard Crashfield

The account of Crashfield was based almost entirely on Crashfield's account of his examinations. This account appeared in the 1563 edition and remained unchanged in subsequent editions.

MarginaliaAugust. 5.ABout this time suffered at Norwiche, a godly man & a constant martyr of Christ, called Richard Crashfield whose examination before the Chauncellor, named Dunnynges, as he penned them with hys owne hand, so haue we faythfully recorded the same.

MarginaliaThe examinatiō of Rich. Crashfield before Dūning Chauncellor of Norwich.How say you Syrha, sayd the Chancellor, to the ceremonyes of the Church?

Then sayd I: what ceremonies?

He sayd vnto me: Do you not beleue that all the ceremonies of the church were good and godly?

My aunswere was: I do beleue so many as are groūded in the testament of Iesus Christ.

Tush, sayd he, do you beleeue in the MarginaliaSacrament of the Aultar.Sacrament of the aultar?

I sayd, I knew not what it was.

Then sayd he: Do you not beleeue that Christe tooke bread, gaue thankes, brake it, and sayde: Take, eate, thys is my body.

Yes verily, sayd I, and euen as Christ did speake, so did he performe the worke.

Tush, sayd he, doe you not beleeue this, that after the wordes be spoken by the prieste, there is the substaunce of Christes body, flesh and bloud? How say you, doe you not beleue this? Speake man.

I doe beleeue that Christes body was broken for me vppon the Crosse, and his bloud shed for my redemption, wherof the bread and the wyne is a perpetuall memory, þe pledge of hys mercy, the ring and seale of hys promise, and a perpetuall memory for the faythfull, vnto the ende of the world. So then I was commaunded into prison vntil the next day.

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¶ An other examination of Richard Crashfield.

MarginaliaAn other examination of Richard Crashfield.THe daye following I was brought foorth. Then the Chauncellor sayd vnto me: Richard, how say you? Are you otherwise minded then you were yesterdaye? Hee rehearsing all the wordes that we hadde afore, sayde: are not

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