Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
George Looson

Of Coddenham, Suffolk.

George Looson, along with John Haman, arrested Thomas Spurdance, who had fled Cornfield for not attending mass. 1563, p. 1677.

 
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John Hallingdale

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Of London.

John Hallingdale was examined before Bonner on 5 November 1557. 1563, p. 1638, 1570, p. 2222, 1576, p. 1918, 1583, p. 2025.

Articles against him were ministered and answers given. 1563, pp. 1638, 1640-42, 1570, p. 2222, 1576, pp. 1918-19, 1583, pp. 2025-26.

During his examination, John Hallingdale said that Cranmer, Latimer, Ridley and Hooper were not heretics. 1563, p. 1638, 1570, p. 2222, 1576, p. 1919, 1583, p. 2026.

He was condemned on 6 November 1557. 1563, p. 1638, 1570, p. 2222, 1576, p. 1919, 1583, p. 2026.

He was burned at Smithfield on 18 November 1557. 1563, p. 1638, 1570, p. 2222, 1576, p. 1919, 1583, p. 2026.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Haman [alias Barker]

Of Coddenham, Suffolk.

John Haman, along with George Looson, arrested Thomas Spurdance, who had fled Cornfield for not attending mass. 1563, p. 1677.

 
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Richard Gibson

(d. 1557)

Prisoner in the Compter in the Poultry. Martyr. Of London.

Richard Gibson was sent for by a promoter called Robin Caly. 1563, p. 1640, 1570, p. 2224, 1576, p. 1920, 1583, p. 2026.

Caly acted impiously and cruelly towards Gibson as he transferred him from prison. 1563, p. 1641, 1570, p. 2224, 1576, p. 1920, 1583, p. 2026.

Gibson was imprisoned in the Compter in the Poultry from May to November 1557. 1563, p. 1640, 1570, p. 2224, 1576, p. 1920, 1583, p. 2026.

Articles were brought against him, he gave answers and his articles were proponed. 1563, pp. 1640-42, 1644-45 1570, pp. 2223-24, 1576, pp. 1919-20, 1583, pp. 2026-28 [2028 incorrectly numbered as 2034].

Witnesses against Richard Gibson were William Wood, John Babington, Thomas Hawes, Thomas Cornish, Richard Lawkenor, Nicholas Grove, and Owen Claydon. 1563, p. 1642.

The interrogatories against Gibson are given. 1563, pp. 1642-43, 1570, pp. 2222-23, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [2028 incorrectly numbered as 2034].

Gibson was condemned on 6 November 1557. 1563, p. 1643, 1570, p. 2223, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [2028 incorrectly numbered as 2034].

He was burned at Smithfield on 18 November 1557. 1563, p. 1643, 1570, p. 2223, 1576, p. 1921, 1583, p. 2028 [2028 incorrectly numbered as 2034].

[Richard Gibson was imprisoned in the Poultry (1563, p. 1640). Bradford spoke of Gibson as being thousands of pounds in debt. (ECL 260, fo.204r). Foxe states that Gibson was a prisoner for two years (1563, p. 1640); this would mean that Gibson was imprisoned in 1555. Gibson, on 27 October 1556, spoke of 'my long imprisonment' (BL, Harley 425, fo.122r, printed in Strype, EM, III, 2, p. 46).

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In February 1555, Bradford listed 'John' Gibson among the freewillers he admonished to receive the truth of predestination (BL, Add. Ms.19400, fo.33r). Later that spring, Bradford spoke of having talks with Gibson and hoping for his conversion (ECL 260, fo.204r).

On 25 April 1556, John Careless stated, during his examination, that Gibson had worked, along with Henry Hart and John Kemp, to convert William Tyms and six other martyrs to freewill theology (1563, p. 1630).

On 22 June 1556, Gibson write a letter to a group of freewillers, including John Jackson, Stephen Gratwick and Henry Wickham, defending himself against charges of apostacy and also maintaining that the elect were predestined to salvation. (ECL 260, fo.72r).

In October 1556, Gibson made a very cautiously worded recantation to Bonner (BL, Harley 425, fo.122r; printed in Strype, EM, III, 2, pp. 46-47). Gibson, probably at this time, answered articles Bonner submitted to him; at first very cagily (Strype, ibid., pp. 47-52) but then, doubtless under increased pressure, Gibson made fully orthodox answers to Bonner's articles (Harley 425, fo. 99r; printed in Strype, loc.op. cit., pp. 53-56). Gibson must, however, have recanted the recantation, for he remained in prison.

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On 6 April 1557 he taunted with nine interrogatories of his own, denouncing catholic teaching and practice while also admonishing Bonner on the proper conduct of a bishop (1563, pp. 1644-45). (This was probably an indication that Bonner had continued to pressure Gibson through the winter of 1556/57.) Bonner then ministered another set of articles to Gibson on 8 May 1557 (1563, pp. 1640-41).

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Gibson was examined on 5 and 6 November 1557 and was condemned on 6 November (1563, pp. 1641-43). He was burned on 18 November 1557 (1563, p. 1644).

Note that his maternal grandfather was Sir William Bryly, the lord mayor of London in 1524/25. Richard Gibson's father, also named Richard, was a royal sergeant-at-arms, master of the Merchant Taylors, swordbearer and bailiff of Southwark and an MP for New Romney in 1529 (Bindoff under Richard Gibson (by 1480 - 1534).

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Henry Machyn identifies Richard Gibson as the son of 'segantt Gybson, sergantt of armes, and of the reywelles (revels) and of the kinges tentes' (The Diary of Henry Machyn, ed. JG Nichols, Camden Society, Original Series 42 (London, 1848), pp. 157-58).]

 
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William Sparrow

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Of London.

William Sparrow gave answers to the articles against him. 1563, p. 1638, 1570, p. 2223, 1576, pp. 1918-19, 1583, p. 2026.

He was condemned on 6 November 1557. 1563, p. 1638, 1570, p. 2223, 1576, p. 1918, 1583, p. 2026.

He was burned at Smithfield on 18 November 1557. 1563, p. 2222, 1570, p. 2222, 1576, p. 1918, 1583, p. 2026.

 
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Bury St. Edmunds
Berry, Burie, Bury, Burye, S. Edmondsbury, Saint Edmundes Bury, Sainte Edmundes Burye, S. Edmunds Bury, S. Edmundsbury
NGR: TL 853 649

A borough and market town, having exclusive jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Thingoe, county of Suffolk. 26.5 miles north-west by north from Ipswich. The monastery at the dissolution was worth £2336 16s. per annum. Bury comprises the parishes of St. Mary and St. James. The living of each is a donative in the patronage of the mayor and corporation.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Codnam
Codnam
NGR:

Unidentified

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2049 [2025]

Queene Mary. John Hallingdale, Will. Sparow, Rich. Gybson, Martyrs.

MarginaliaAnno 1557. October.euen so is the Pope the head of the Church of Christ. And as the Bees in the hiue haue a maister Bee when they are gone out, to bring them home againe to the hiue: euen so the Pope when we be gone astray and wandered from the fold, from the hiue, &c. then is ordeined our head by succession of Peter, to bring vs home againe to the true church: as thou now my good fellow hast wandred long out of the way like a scattered sheepe, &c. Heare therefore that Belwether, the maister bell, &c. & come home with vs to thy mother the true church againe.

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Vnto whom I aunswered: My Lord, all this is but naturall reason, & no scripture: but since ye cannot prooue the Pope to be authorised by scripture, ye aunswer not me as I thought ye would.

Ha, sayd he, I see well ye be stout, and will not be answered: therfore ye shall be compelled by law whether ye will or no.

My Lord sayd I, so did your forefathers intreat Christ and his Apostles. MarginaliaThe Phariseys lawe.They had a law, and by their lawe they put hym to death: and so likewyse, you haue a law which is tyrannie, & by that would ye inforce me to beleue as you doe. But the Lord I trust will assist me agaynst all your beggerly ceremonies, and make your foolishnesse knowen to all the world one day.

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Then sayd he, when were ye at church & went in procession, and did the ceremonies of the church?

And I sayd, neuer since I was borne.

No sayd he? How old are you?

And I sayd, I thinke about xl.Why said he, how did you vse your selfe at Church xx. yeres ago?

I sayd, as you do now.

And euen now, said he, you sayd you did not the Ceremonies since you were borne.

No more I did sayd I, since I was borne a newe: as Christ sayd vnto Nicodemus, except ye be borne a newe, ye cannot enter into the kingdom of heauen.

Then sayd a D. that sate by, he is a very Anabaptist: for that is their opinion playne.

No sir, you say falsely, sayd I, for I am no Anabaptist: for they denye Children to bee Baptised, and so doe not I.

Well sayd the B. why doest thou not go to the church, and do the ceremonies?

And I sayd: because they be contrary to Gods worde and lawes, as you your selfe haue taught: but nowe you say it is good agayne: and I thinke if there were a returne to morrow, you would say that is false again which you hold now. Therfore I may well say there is no truth in you.

Then sayd the B. thou art a stubborne fellow, and an heretike, and a Traitor.

No sayde I, I am no Traitour, for I haue done I thinke, better seruice to the crowne imperiall of England, then you.

If you had done so good seruice (said he) you would be obedient to the lawes of the Realme.

So I am, sayd I. There is no man alyue (I thanke God) to accuse me iustly that euer I was disobedient to any ciuill lawes. But you must consider my Lord, that I haue a soule and a body, MarginaliaObedience to Princes, how farre.& my soule is none of þe Queenes, but my body and my goods are the Queenes. And I must geue God my soule, and all that belongeth vnto it: that is, I must do the law and commandements of God, and whosoeuer commandeth lawes contrary to Gods laws, I may not do them for losing of my soule, but rather obey God then man.

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And he sayd: why doest thou not these lawes thē? are they not agreeable to Gods law?

And I sayd, no, you cannot prooue them to bee Gods lawes.

Yes sayth he, that I can.

Then sayd I, if you can prooue me by the word of God that you should haue any grauen Images made to set in your churches for lay mens bookes, or to worship God by them, or that you should haue any Ceremonies in your church as you haue, prooue them by the word of God, and I will do them.

MarginaliaImages.Then sayde hee, It is a good and decent order to furnishe the Church: as when you shall goe to dinner, you haue a clothe vppon the table to furnish the Table before the meate shall come vppon it: so are these ceremonies a comely decent order to be in the Church among Christian people.

These sayd I are inuentions and imaginations out of your owne braine, without any worde of God to prooue them. For God sayth: looke what you thinke good in your owne eyes, if I commaund the contrary, it is abhomina-

ble in my sight. And these ceremonies are agaynst Gods lawes. For S. Paul sayth, they be weake and beggerly, & rebuketh the Galathians for doyng of them.

Well, sayd he: If you will not do them, seyng they bee the lawes of the realme, you are an heretike and disobedient: and therefore come home agayne and confesse your fault with vs, that you haue bene in errour, &c. Wyll you doe so?

And I sayd no, I haue bene in no error: for the spirituall lawes were neuer trulier set forth, then in my maister K, Edwards tyme, and I trust vnto God I shall neuer forsake them whiles I lyue.

Then came a Gentleman to me and sayd: are ye wiser then all men? and haue ye more knowledge then all men? will you cast away your soule willingly? my Lord and other men also, woulde fayne you woulde saue your selfe: therfore chuse some man where you will, eyther spirituall or temporall, and take a day: my Lord wyll geue it you.

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Then sayd I, if I saue my lyfe, I shall loose it, and if I loose my lyfe for Christes sake, I shall finde it in lyfe euerlasting. And if I take a day, whē the day commeth, I must say then, euen as I do now, except I will lye, and therfore that needeth not.

Well, then haue him away sayd the Bishop.

This aboue named Thomas Spurdance was one of Queene Maries seruauntes, and was taken by two of his fellowes, the sayd Queenes seruauntes named MarginaliaTho. Spurdance by whom he was apprehended.Iohn Haman, otherwise called Barker, and George Looson, 

Commentary  *  Close

His name is given as George Lawson in 1563, pp. 1677-78. ElizabethLawson, wife of William Lawson, also of Coddenham, was sentenced along with Spurdance (BL, Harley MS 421, fos. 177r-178v). On Elizabeth Lawson see 1563, p. 1677; 1570, pp. 2274-75; 1576, pp. 1953-54 and 1583, pp. 2270-71.

both dwelling in Codnam in the Countie of Suffolke, who caried hym to one maister Gosnall, dwellyng in the sayd Codnam, and by hym he was sent to Bury, where he remayned in prison, and afterward burned in the moneth of Nouember.

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¶ The story and Martyrdome of three constant witnesses of Christ. 
Commentary  *  Close
Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson

The entire account of these three martyrs was first printed in the 1563 edition. In the 1570 edition Foxe pruned this account back, apparently to save paper rather than from religious or political motives. It was reprinted without change in subsequent editions.

MarginaliaNouember. 18. MarginaliaThe story & Martyrdome of Iohn Hallingdale, William Sparrow, Richard Gibson.NOt long after the Martyrdome of the two good women at Colchester, aboue named, were three faythfull witnesses of the Lordes Testament, tormented and put to death in Smithfield at London, the 18. of Nouemb.  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 433, middle

There is a reference to this martyrdom in an unexpected quarter - Mr. P. Collier's Hist. of English Dram. Poetry, i. 63 - extracted from a MS. in the Cotton Library:-
"The 13 day of November was sant Erkenwold evyn, the 4 and 5 of K. and Quen: whent out of Nugatt unto Smythfeld to be bernyd 3 men: on was Gybsun, the sun of Serjent Gybsun, Serjant of arms, and of the revylls and of the kyngs tentes; and 2 more, the whyche here be ther names - Gybsun, Hald and Sparow, thes 3 men."
The 14th of November having been appointed to be kept sacred to the memory of Bishop Erkenwald, the day on which these martyrs suffered may be more accurately given in the above extract than Foxe. See Weever's Funeral Monuments, p. 359.

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in the yeare aforesayd, whose names hereafter follow.

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Iohn Hallyngdale.
William Sparow.
Richard Gybson.

Which three were produced before Boner B. of London, the v. day of Nouem. 1557. and had by hym and his Officers certaine Articles ministred, the summe whereof hereafter followeth.

Articles ministred by Boner vnto Iohn Hallingdale.

MarginaliaArticles agaynst Iohn Hallingdale,FIrst, that the sayd Iohn Hallyngdale is of the Diocesse of London, and so subiect to the iurisdiction of the Bishop of London.

Secondly, that the sayd Iohn before the tyme of the raigne of K. Edward the 6 late K. of England, was of the same fayth and religion that was then obserued, beleeued, taught, & set forth in the realme of England.

Thirdly, that duryng the raigne of the sayd K. Edward the 6. the said Iohn Hallingdale, vppon occasion of the preachyng of certaine ministers in that tyme, did not abide in his former fayth and religion, but did depart from it, and so did and doth continue till this present day, and so determineth to do (as he sayeth) tyll his lyues ende.

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Fourthly, that the sayd Iohn Hallyngdale hath thought, beleeued and spoken diuers tymes, that the fayth, religion, and ecclesiasticall seruice receiued, obserued & vsed now in this realme of England, is not good and laudable, but agaynst Gods commādement and word, especially concernyng the Masse and the seuē Sacraments: and that he the sayd Iohn, wil not in any wyse conforme hymselfe to the same, but speake and thinke agaynst it duryng his naturall lyfe.

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Fiftly, that the sayd 

Commentary  *  Close

Foxe edited non-essential details from this article in the 1570 edition.

Iohn 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 433, line 5 from the bottom

This fifth article is given more at length in Edition 1563, p. 1638:-
"hath thought, beleved, and spoken, and so doth thinke, beleve, and content to speake, that he being out pryson, and at his own libertie, is not bound to come to his owne parishe churche to heare mattins, masse, and even-song there, or any divine service song or sayde there, as it is now used here in England, and that therefore he hath not come to his own parishe churche of S. Leonards aforesayd, especially these two yeares last past, but..."
In article 6 also: "man child, *(the place he will not name, nor yet the minister, nor the godfathers or godmother, or midwife, or other that was present, saving his own selfe, whom he saith was there present) he the said John caused."

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absenteth himselfe continually frō his owne Parish church of S. Leonards, neyther hearing Mattins, Masse, nor Euensong, nor yet confessing his sinnes to the Priest, or receiuyng the Sacrament of the aultar at his hands, or in vsing other Ceremonies as they are nowe vsed in this Churche and realme of England: and as he remembreth, he neuer came but once in the parish church of S. Leonard, and careth not (as hee sayth) if he neuer come there any more, the seruice beyng as it is there, and so many abuses being there, as he saith there are, espe-

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cially
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