Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Elizabeth Holland

Serving maid to Master Kempton. Wife of Roger Holland. Of London.

Elizabeth professed the gospel to Roger Holland when he was still young. 1570, p. 2237, 1576, p. 1932, 1583, p. 2040.

She made Holland promise to cast away papistry and attend lectures at All Hallows and sermons at St Paul's, as well as buy a Testament and service book. She gave him some money. 1570, p. 2237, 1576, p. 1932, 1583, p. 2040.

She married Roger Holland. 1570, p. 2237, 1576, p. 1932, 1583, p. 2040.

She had a child who was baptised by Master Rose. 1570, p. 2237, 1576, p. 1932, 1583, p. 2040.

She was arrested and treated badly by Bonner's henchmen. 1570, p. 2237, 1576, p. 1932, 1583, p. 2040.

 
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John Harpsfield

(1516 - 1578)

Chaplain to Bishop Bonner. Archdeacon of London (1554 - 1559); dean of Norwich (1558 - 1559). Brother of Nicholas Harpsfield. [DNB; Fasti]

Harpsfield preached a sermon at the commencement of the 1553 convocation (1570, p. 1571; 1576, p. 1340; and 1583, p. 1410).

He sparred with Philpot in the debates at the 1553 convocation. (See 1563, pp. 909, 912 and 914-15; 1570, pp. 1573-74 and 1576-78; 1576, pp. 1342 and 1345-46 and 1583, pp. 1412 and 1416-17).

He was one of the catholic disputants at the Oxford disputations of 1554; he debated with Cranmer and Ridley (1563, pp. 932-34, 938, 955, 967-69 and 978; 1570, pp. 1591-93 and 1605-6; 1576, pp. 1358-59 and 1370-71; 1583, pp. 1428, 1430 and 1440-41).

Harpsfield disputed on the eucharist for his D.D. on 19 April 1554; Cranmer disputed with him (1563, pp. 986-91; 1570, pp. 1627-32; 1576, pp. 1389-92; 1583, pp. 1459-63).

He gave a Latin oration in St Paul's before King Philip (1570, p. 1643; 1576, p. 1402; 1583, p. 1473).

He witnessed Bonner's burning Tomkins' hand with a candle, and he urged Bonner to cease the torture (1570, pp. 1710-11; 1576, p. 1460; 1583, p.1534).

Together with William Chedsey and John Feckenham, Harpsfield attempted to persuade John Hooper to recant after his condemnation on 29 January 1555. The attempt was unsuccessful but it caused false rumors of Hooper's recantation to spread (1563, p. 1057; 1570, p. 1680; 1576, p. 1434; 1583, p. 1507).

Harpsfield witnessed the degradation of John Rogers and John Hooper on 4 February 1555 (1563, p. 1058; 1570, p. 1681; 1576, p. 1435; 1583, p. 1508).

He was one of those who presided over the examination of Thomas Tomkins on 9 February 1555 (1570, p. 1712; 1576, p. 1461; 1583, p. 1535).

Harpsfield was one of those who examined Thomas Causton and Thomas Higbed on 18 February 1555 (1563, p. 1104). Bonner ordered him to deliver a rebuttal to the confession of faith of Thomas Causton and Thomas Higbed (1563, p. 1107; 1570, p. 1719; 1576, p. 1468; 1583, p. 1541).

He conversed with Thomas Hawkes in June 1554, arguing the necessity of infant baptism. 1563, pp. 1151-52;1570, pp. 1760-61; 1576, p. 1551 [recte 1503]; 1583, pp. 1587-88

He escorted Thomas Hawkes to the Gatehouse at Westminster on 1 July 1554. 1563, p. 1156; 1570, p. 1765;1576, p. 1765; 1583, p. 1590

John Harpsfield conferred with the bishop of Durham about John Bradford. 1563, p. 1191, 1570, p. 1787, 1576, p. 1526, 1583, p. 1609.

On 16 February 1555 John Harpsfield and two others went to see Bradford in prison, to defend the line of bishops in the catholic church. Bradford refuted the argument. 1563, pp. 1202-03, 1570, pp. 1792-93, 1576, pp. 1530-31, 1583, pp. 1614-15.

Smith was examined by Bonner and Harpsfield, among others, met with Harwood in the garden, and was re-examined. Smith was then left in the garden until Harwood was examined, after which Smith was examined again. 1563, pp. 1252-55, 1570, pp. 1870-72, 1576, pp. 1601-03, 1583, pp. 1691-92.

Robert Smith was examined by John Dee, Harpsfield and Bonner on eucharistic doctrine. 1563, p. 1252, 1570, p. 1870, 1576, p. 1601, 1583, p. 1691.

Philpot's fourth examination was in John Harpsfield's house before Bonner, Bath, Worcester and Gloucester. 1563, pp. 1393-98, 1570, pp. 1965-68, 1576, pp. 1692-95, 1583, pp. 1799-1803.

[In a letter that was never delivered] Green told Philpot of his presentment on 17 November before Bonner and two bishops, Master Dean, Roper, Welch, John Harpsfield, and two or three others. Dr Dale, Master George Mordant and Master Dee were also there. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

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Philpot's eighth examination was before Bonner, John Harpsfield, St David's, Mordant and others. 1563, pp. 1419-20, 1570, pp. 1982-83, 1576, pp. 1705-06, 1583, p. 1814.

During Philpot's ninth examination, Bonner called for John Harpsfield, who attended the session to examine Philpot, and Chadsey, who had however left for Westminster. 1563, pp. 1420-24, 1570, pp. 1983-85, 1576, pp. 1707-09, 1583, pp. 1815-16.

Philpot's eleventh examination, on St Andrew's day, was before Durham, Chichester, Bath, Bonner, the prolocutor, Christopherson, Chadsey, Morgan of Oxford, Hussey of the Arches, Weston, John Harpsfield, Cosin, and Johnson. 1563, pp. 1425-34, 1570, pp. 1986-92, 1576, pp. 1710-15, 1583, pp. 1817-22.

Later on the day of his thirteenth examination, Philpot spoke with John Harpsfield, Bonner and Chadsey. 1570, pp. 1996-97, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, pp. 1823-24.

John Harpsfield urged Thomas Whittle to recant and composed a bill of submission for Whittle to sign. 1563, pp. 1454-55, 1570, p. 2017, 1576, p. 1737, 1583, pp. 1845-46.

John Harpsfield wrote a letter to Bonner about Whittle's suscription. It mentioned one of Penbroke's men who wanted license to erect a school. Harpsfield hoped for Penbroke's sake that it be requested, and he and M Johnson (Register) were working to that effect. 1563, pp. 1455-56, 1570, pp. 2017-18, 1576, p. 1738, 1583, pp. 1846-47. [In all editions after 1563, the heading incorrectly gives the author of the letter as Nicholas Harpsfield.]

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Robert Farrer talked with Laurence Sheriff in the Rose tavern and suggested to Sheriff that Elizabeth had been involved in Wyatt's rebellion. Sheriff complained to Bonner about Farrer before Mordaunt, Sir John Baker, Darbyshire, Story, Harpsfield, and others. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 2097.

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Bonner sent Thomas Hinshaw before John Harpsfield and Henry Cole. 1563, p. 1690, 1570, p. 2242, 1576, p. 1937, 1583, p. 2043.

Bonner attended evensong with John Harpsfield prior to causing several boys to be beaten in 1558. 1563, p. 1692, 1570, p. 2264, 1576, p. 1955, 1583, p. 2061.

Bonner and Harpsfield laughed at and mocked Edward Benet for his beliefs. 1576, p. 1968 [incorrectly numbered 1632], 1583, p. 2075.

Harpsfield was committed to the Fleet after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

 
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John Redman

(1499 - 1551)

DD (1537). Master of Trinity College, Cambridge (1546 - 1551). Relative of Cuthbert Tunstall. (DNB)

Dr Redman was an enemy of Latimer at Cambridge. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, pp. 1735-36.

Foxe includes a copy in English and Latin of the letter Latimer received from Dr Redman, who revoked him for the doctrine he taught. Latimer's brief response is also included. 1563, p. 1308, 1570, pp. 1905-06, 1576, p. 1632 [English only], 1583, p. 1736.

Foxe includes Redman's epitaph or funeral verses on the death of Martn Bucer. 1563, p. 1558, 1570, p. 2152 [cross reference to 1563 only], 1576, p. 1859 [cross reference to 1563 only], 1583, p. 1968.

Redman was present for the judgement against Bucer and Phagius on 17 January 1557. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2147, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1956.

When the commission found no witnesses to support Bucer and Phagius, they called aside Drs Young, Sedgwick, Bullock, Taylor, Maptide, Hunter, Parker, Redman, as well as Brown, Gogman, Rud, Johnson, Mitch, Raven and Carre. They were all commanded to give witness against Bucer and Phagius. 1563, p. 1538, 1570, p. 2147, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1956.

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Master Kempton

Of the Black Boy in Watling Street.

Roger Holland was apprentice to Master Kempton at the Black Boy in Watling Street. He caused trouble for his master because of his riotous and wanton behaviour. 1570, p. 2237, 1576, p. 1932, 1583, p. 2040.

Holland was assisted in his early protestantism by a maid in the house called Elizabeth who advised him on what he should do and whom he later married. 1570, p. 2237, 1576, p. 1932, 1583, p. 2040.

 
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Nicholas Harpsfield

(1519? - 1575)

Archdeacon of Canterbury; vicar-general of London. Author of the most important contemporary attack on the Acts and Monuments. Younger brother of John Harpsfield [DNB]

Nicholas Harpsfield discussed the sacrament and ceremonies with Thomas Hawkes on 30 June 1554, but soon gave up hope of changing Hawke's opinions. 1563, p. 1156; 1570, p. 1764; 1576, p. 1507; 1583, p. 1590

Harpsfield took depositions regarding John Tooley's heretical speech from the gallows. 1563, p. 1144

He examined Thomas Wattes on 4 May 1555 and he urged Wattes to recant. Wattes refused, telling Harpsfield that his efforts were in vain. 1563, p. 1165; 1570, p. 1771; 1576, p. 1512; 1583, 1596

Nicholas Harpsfield is described by Foxe as one who was occupied with dispatching the godly during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

On 28 May Nicholas Harpsfield had the mayor's sergeant bring John Bland before him, and Master Collins (comissary), in Thornden's house. Talk took place between Harspfield, Collins and Bland. 1563, pp. 1220-21, 1570, pp. 1845-46, 1576, pp. 1579-80, 1583, p. 1667.

On 21 May Bland appeared in the chapter house before Nicholas Harspfield. 1563, pp. 1221-23, 1570 p. 1846, 1576 p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Bland asked that Richard Thornden, bishop of Dover, and Robert Collins, commissary, be present at the disputation over the sacrament between Nicholas Harspfield and Bland. 1563, p. 1222, 1570, p. 1846, 1576, p. 1580, 1583, p. 1668.

Nicholas Sheterden discussed eucharistic doctrine with the archdeacon Nicholas Harpsfield and Robert Collins. 1563, pp. 1231-32, 1570, p. 1853, 1576, pp. 1585-86, 1583, pp. 1673-74.

William Cokar was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Richard Colliar was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

William Hopper was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

Henry Lawrence was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1249, 1570, p. 1867, 1576, p. 1598, 1583, p. 1688.

William Sterne was examined before Nicholas Harpsfield, Richard Thornden, Faucet, and Robert Collins; he gave answers and was condemned. 1563, p. 1250, 1570, p. 1868, 1576, p. 1599, 1583, p. 1688.

George Brodbridge was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August for having refused to say confession to a priest. 1563, p. 1273. The examination is referred to in 1570, p. 1884, 1576, p. 1614, 1583, p. 1708.

Anthony Burwarde was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

Robert Streater was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

James Tutrye was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden on 3 August. 1563, p. 1273.

John Webbe was examined by Nicholas Harpsfield and Thornden. 1563, pp. 1386-87, 1570, pp. 1959-60, 1576, p. 1687, 1583, p. 1794.

Harpsfield is described as a great persecutor. 1563, p. 1546, 1570, p. 2039, 1576, p. 1860, 1583, p. 1954.

Thomas Alsey met with John Kingston to discuss the delivery of forty-six shillings and eight pence to Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2156, 1576, p. 1864, 1583, p. 1975 [incorrectly numbered 1971].

Martin Bradbridge was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Nicholas Final was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Hay was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Thomas Hudson was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Stephen Kempe was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Lowick was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 2155, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

John Philpot of Tenterden was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Matthew Plaise was examined by Thornden, Nicholas Harpsfield and Collins. 1570, pp. 2169-71, 1576, pp. 1873-75, 1583, pp. 1982-83.

Harpsfield took part in Richard Woodman's fifth and sixth examinations. 1563, pp. 1599-1601, 1570, pp. 2190-94, 1576, pp. 1890-93, 1583, pp. 1999-2002.

William Prowting was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1604, 1570, p. 2198, 1576, p. 1897, 1583, p. 2005.

Thomas Stephens was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1570, p. 2154, 1576, p. 2155, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

William Waterman was condemned by Richard Thornden and Nicholas Harpsfield. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1861, 1583, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1970].

Nicholas Harpsfield urged on the condemnation of five martyrs at Canterbury so that they could be burned before the death of Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1673, 1570, p. 2253, 1576, p. 1946, 1583, p. 2053.

Harpsfield was committed to the Fleet after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2102.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Rose

'M. Rose' was arrested, along with a congregation of 30 people for whom he was celebrating communion, in the churchyard of St Mary-le-Bow, on 1 January 1555 (1570, p. 1652; 1576, p. 1409; 1583, p. 1480; cf. 1563, p. 1020).

On 3 January 1554, Rose was brought before Stephen Gardiner, informally examined, and then sent to the Tower (1570, p. 1652; 1576, p. 1409; 1583, p. 1480).

Rose's secret conventicle was discussed in Parliament in 1555. They had prayed that God turn Mary's heart from idolatry or shorten her days. Parliament decreed that certain 'evill prayers' would be treason (1570, p. 1654; 1576, p. 1411; 1583, pp. 1481-82).

A letter was sent to Hooper describing the arrest of Rose and his congregation; the letter is dated 3 January 1555 (1563, p. 1020).

Hooper wrote an answer to this letter (1563, p. 1020; LM, p. 120; 1570, p. 1654; 1576, p. 1411; 1583, p. 1482).

Hooper also sent a letter of encouragement to the members of Rose's congregation imprisoned in the Counter in Bread Street (1563, pp. 1021-22; , pp. 121-23; 1570, pp. 1654-55; 1576, pp. 1411-12; 1583, pp. 1482-83).

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Chedsey

(1510 - 1574?)

Of Somersetshire. Chaplain to Bishop Bonner. Archdeacon of Middlesex (1554 - 1559). President of Corpus Christi College, Oxford (1558 - 1559). [DNB; Fasti; Foster]

After the death of Edward VI Chedsey recanted and mutated his doctrine to his own purpose, as in his dispute with Peter Martyr.

Chedsey preached at Paul's Cross on 27 August 1553 (1570, p. 1635; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1465).

He argued with John Philpot in defence of transubstantiation in the 1553 convocation (1563, pp. 910-11; 1570, pp. 1574-75; 1576, p. 1342-3; and 1583, pp. 1413-14).

He was one of the catholic disputants in the Oxford disputations of 1554. He debated with Cranmer on the morning of Monday 16 April (1563, pp. 932-33, 939-43, 946-48, 951 and 954-55; 1570, pp. 1594-96, 1599-1600, 1602 and 1604-5; 1576, pp 1360-62, 1364-65, 1367 and 1369-70; 1583, pp. 1430-32, 1435-1436, 1437 and 1439-40).

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When Chedsey addressed the lord mayor of London, he mentioned two letters- one from the queen and another from the privy council. The council letter was about procession and prayer at the agreement of peace between England and France. The signatories were: Francis Shrewsberye, Penbroke, Thomas Cheyny, William Peter, Thomas Wharton and Richard Southwell. Foxe suggests that he had seen the letter. 1563, p. 1217.

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He published a declaration at Paul's Cross in May 1555. 1563, p. , 1570, p. , 1576, p. , 1583, p. .

Chedsey tried to persuade Hooper to recant after his condemnation on 29 January 1555. He was unsuccessful but false rumors circulated that Hooper had recanted. 1563, p. 1057; 1570, p. 1680; 1576, p. 1434; 1583, p. 1507.

He witnessed Bishop Bonner's burning Thomas Tomkins' hand with a candle. 1570, p. 1710; 1576, p. 1460; 1583, p. 1534.

In late June 1554, Chedsey discussed vernacular services and the adoration of the cross with Thomas Hawkes. The next day Chedsey preached in Bonner's chapel, extolling the saving power of the eucharist. 1563, pp. 1154-55; 1570, pp. 1763-64; 1576, p. 1506; 1583, p. 1589

Philpot's sixth examination was before the Lord Chamberlain to Queen Mary, Ferrars, Lord Rich, Lord St John, Lord Windsor, Lord Shandoys, Sir John Bridges, Chadsey and Bonner. 1563, pp. 1405-12, 1570, pp. 1972-78, 1576, pp. 1698-1702, 1583, pp. 1805-10.

Philpot's seventh examination on 19 November 1555 was before Bonner, Rochester, chancellor of Lichfield, Chadsey and John Dee. 1563, pp. 1412-16, 1570, pp. 1978-80, 1576, pp. 1702-05, 1583, pp. 1810-12.

During Philpot's ninth examination, Bonner called for John Harpsfield, who attended the session, to examine Philpot and Chadsey, who had however left for Westminster. 1563, pp. 1420-24, 1570, pp. 1983-85, 1576, pp. 1707-09, 1583, pp. 1815-16.

Philpot's eleventh examination, on St Andrew's day, was before Durham, Chichester, Bath, Bonner, the prolocutor, Christopherson, Chadsey, Morgan of Oxford, Hussey of the Arches, Weston, John Harpsfield, Cosin, and Johnson. 1563, pp. 1425-34, 1570, pp. 1986-92, 1576, pp. 1710-15, 1583, pp. 1817-22.

Philpot spoke with Worcester, Wright and Chadsey later the same day as his twelfth examination. 1570, pp. 1993-94, 1576, p. 1717, 1583, pp. 1823-24.

Later on the day of his thirteenth examination, Philpot spoke with John Harpsfield, Bonner and Chadsey. 1570, pp. 1996-97, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, pp. 1823-24.

The last examination of Philpot was on 16 December 1555 before Bonner and other bishops, including York, Chichester, Bath, John Harpsfield, Chadsey, Bonner, into which entered William Garret, knight, the lord mayor and the sheriff (Thomas Leigh) of London and Sir Martin Bowes, knight. 1563, p. 1441, 1570, pp. 1997-98, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, p. 1827.

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Chedsey testified in the presence of Master Moseley and the lieutenant of the Tower that Bartlett Green had denied transubstantiation. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

A declaration was made at Paul's Cross by William Chedsey at Bonner's commandment. 1563, p. 1217.

Benold was examined before Chedsey, John Kingston, John Boswell, the two bailiffs of Colchester (Robert Brown and Robert Mainard) and several others on 23 June 1557. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

Elizabeth Folkes was examined before Chedsey, John Kingston, John Boswell, the two bailiffs of Colchester (Robert Brown and Robert Mainard) and several others on 23 June 1557. Chedsey wept when the sentence of condemnation was read against her. 1563, p. 1610, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2008.

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When Alexander Wimshurst arrived at St Paul's, he saw Chedsey, his old acquaintance at Oxford, and said to him that he would rather be examined by Martin than by anyone else. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

William Wood was examined by Chedsey, Kenall and Robinson on 19 October 1554 in St Nicholas's church, Rochester. 1570, p. 2281, 1576, pp. 1969-70, 1583, p. 2077.

Chedsey was committed to the Fleet after the death of Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

He sent a letter to Bonner dated 21 April 1558 [BL, Ms. Harley 416, fos.74r-v. Foxe describes the letter on 1570, p. 2301 et seq.]

[Foxe frequently refers to him as 'Chadsey'.]

2063 [2039]

Queene Mary. The burning of 7. godly Martyrs in Smithfield. Roger Holland.

MarginaliaAnno 1558. Iune.hee was no heretike, nor didde holde any heresie, neither any opinion contrary to the catholike faith, and so would offer him selfe to be iudged therein. Whereuppon he likewise persisting in the same, the sentence was pronounced against him, condemning him to be burnt.

MarginaliaThe condemnation of Henry Ponde.Next to hym was condemned wyth the like sentence, Henry Pond, because he would not submit him self to the Romish church, saying to Boner, that he had done or spoken nothing wherof he was or would be sorie, but that he did holde the truth of God and no heresie. &c.

MarginaliaThe condemnation of Iohn Floyd.After whome next followed Iohn Floyde, who likewise denied to be of the popes church, and saide his minde of the Latine seruice, that the prayers made to Saintes is idolatrie, and that the Seruice in Latine is profitable to none, but only to such as vnderstand the Latine. Moreouer, being charged by Boner of heresie, and sayinge, that what soeuer he and such other now a daies do, all is heresie: for this hee was condemned with the same butcherlye sentence, and so by the secular power was sent away.

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MarginaliaThe condemnation of Robert Southam, Mathew Ricarby, and Roger Holland.Then Robert Southam, after him Mathew Ricarby and last of all Roger Holland were seuerally produced.

Thus Roger Holland with his fellowes (as ye heard) standing to their answeres, and refusing to acknowledge the doctrine of the Romish church, who were alltogether condemned, the sentence being red against them, and so al vij. by secular magistrates being sent awaye to Newgate the 17. of Iune, not long after about the 27. day of the said moneth were hadde to Smithfield, and there ended theyr liues in the glorious cause of Christes gospel. Whose par-

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MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of Henry Ponde, Raynold Eastland, Robert Southam, Mathew Ricarby, Iohn Floyd, Iohn Holyday, Roger Holland, in Smithfield. Anno. 1558. Iune. 27.The burning of vij. godly Martyrs in Smithfield.
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Another example of the quest for full illustration overriding full provision (Day had no cut for seven in one pyre).

ticular examinations came not to our hands: sauing only the examinations of Roger Holland, whych here followe in order and maner as wee receiued them by the information of certaine, who were present at the same.

The examinations and condemnation of Roger Holland. 
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This short biography of Holland first appeared in the 1570 edition and it is based on Holland's account of his examinations and the testimony of someone who knew him. Elizabeth Holland, Roger's wife, is likely to have had a copy of Holland's examinations and she certainly knew him. But the uncertainty as to the identity of the kinsman who left her an important legacy rules her out as Foxe'ssource. But the source was clearly close to Elizabeth as well as Roger Holland.

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MarginaliaThe first examination of Roger Holland.THis Roger Holland a marchant Taylor of London, was first prentise with one maister Kempton at the blacke boy in Watling streete, where hee serued his prentiship wt much trouble vnto his maister in breaking hym from his licencious libertie whych he had before ben trained and brought vp in, geuing himselfe to riote, as dauncing, fence, gaming, banketting, and wanton companie: and besides all this, being a stubborne & an obstinate papist, farre vnlike to come to any suche ende as God called him vnto: the which was as followeth.

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His maister, notwithstanding this his leudnesse, putting him in trust wt his accomptes, he had receiued for him certaine money, to the summe of 30. poundes, and falling into ill companie, lost the saide money euery grote at dice, being past all hope which way to answer it, and therefore he purposed to conuey him selfe away beyond the seas, either into Fraunce or into Flaunders.

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Now hauing determined with himselfe thus to do, he called betimes in the morning to a seruaunt in the house, an auncient and discrete maide, whose name was Elizabeth, which professed the Gospel, with a life agreeing vnto the same, and at al times much rebuking the wilful and obstinate Papistrie, as also the licencious liuing of thys Roger Holland. To whome he sayd: Elizabeth I would I hadde followed thy gentle perswasions and frendly rebukes:which if I hadde done, I hadde neuer come to this shame and miserye which I am nowe fallen into: for this night haue I lost 30, pound of my masters mony, which to pay him and to make vp mine accomptes, I am not able. But thus muche I pray you desire my mistresse, that shee would intreat my master to take this bil of my hand, that I am thus much indebted vnto him, and if I be euer able, I wil see him paied, desiring him that þe matter may passe with silēce, and that none of my kinred nor frendes neuer vnderstand this my leud part. For if it should come vnto my fathers eares, it woulde bring his graye heares ouer soone vnto his graue: and so was he departing.

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The maide considering that it mighte be his vtter vndoing: stay said she, and hauing a peece of money lying by her, geuē vnto her by the death of a kinsman of hers, who (as it was thought, was doctour Redman)shee brought vnto him 30. pounde, saying: MarginaliaA godly example of a mayde, setting more by the soule of a Christen brother then by her money.Roger, heere is thus muche money: I will let thee haue it, and I will keepe this Bill. But since I do thus much for thee, to helpe thee, & to saue thy honestie, thou shalt promise me to refuse all leude and wilde companie, al swearing and ribaldrie talke, and if euer I know thee to play one 12. pēce, at either dice or cardes, then I will shewe this thy bill vnto my maister. And furthermore thou shalt promise me to resort euery day to the lecture at Alhallowes, and the sermon at Pauls euery Sondaye, and to cast away all thy bookes of papistrie and vaine ballets, and get thee the Testament and the Booke of seruice, and read the scriptures with reuerēce and fear, calling vnto God still for his grace to directe thee in hys truth. And pray vnto God feruētly, desiring hym to pardon thy former offences, and not to remember the sinnes of thy youth: and euer be afraid to breake his lawes or offend his maiestie. Then shall God keepe thee and sende thee thy hearts desire.

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MarginaliaRoger Holland brought to the loue of the GospellAfter this time, wtin one halfe yeare God had wrought such a change in this man, that he was become an earnest professor of the truth, and detested al papistrie & euil company: so that he was in admiration to all them that hadde knowen him and seene his former life and wickednesse.

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MarginaliaRoger Holland conuerteth his Parents to the Gospell.Then he repaired into Lankeshiere vnto hys Father, and brought diuers good bookes with him, and bestowed them vppon his frendes, so that his father and others began to taste of the Gospell, and detest the Masse, idolatrie, and superstition: and in the ende his father gaue hym a stocke of money to begin the world withall, to the summe of fiftie pound.

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Then he repaired to London againe, and came to the maide that lent him the money to pay his master withall, and sayd vnto her: MarginaliaRoger Holland repayeth the mayde her money agayne, and maryeth her.Elizabeth, here is thy money I borrowed of thee, and for the frendship, good will, and the good counsel I haue receiued at thy hands, to recompence thee I am not able, otherwise then to make thee my wife: and soone after they were maried, which was in the first yeare of Queene Marie. MarginaliaHollandes childe Christened in his house.And hauing a childe by her, hee caused maister Rose 

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Thomas Rose; see 1576, pp. 1977-79 and 1583, pp. 2083-85.

to baptise his said childe in his owne house. Notwithstanding he was bewrayed vnto the ennemies, and hee being gone into the countrey to conuey the childe away, that the papists shoulde not haue it in their anoynting handes, Boner caused his goodes to be seased vppon, and most cruelly vsed his wife.

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After this he remained closely in the Citie, and in the Countrey in the congregations of the faithfull, vntill the last yeare of Queene Marie. MarginaliaRoger Holland brought to Newgate.Then hee with the vj. other aforesaid, were taken in or not farre from s. Iohns wood, and so brought to Newgate vppon May day in the morning. An. 1558.

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Then being called before the bishop, D. Chedsey, both the Harpsfieldes, & certaine other, after many other faire and craftie perswasions of doctor Chedsey, to allure hym to theyr Babylonicall churche: thus the Bishop beganne with him.

Holland. I for my part do wish well vnto thee, & the more for thy frendes sake. And as doctour Standish telleth me, you and he were both borne in one parish, & he knoweth your father to be a verye honest Catholicke Gentleman. And maister Doctour tolde me that he talked wyth you a yeare a goe, and founde you very wilfully addicte to your owne conceit. Diuers of the Citie also haue shewed me of you, that you haue bene a great procurer of mens seruāts to be of your religion, & to come to your congregations:

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