Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesLatin/Greek TranslationsCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Alice Brook

Catholic. Of Worcester.

Alice Johnson wanted to trap John Davis into being arrested for owning heretical books. She consulted with Thomas Parton and Alice Brook and with certain canons, including Johnson, chancellor to Heath. It was decided that Alice Brook's son, Oliver (a school fellow of Davis), would feign friendship with him and so gain access to Davis's writings. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2073.

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Alice Johnson (alias Collins)

Wife of Richard; charged in 1528, imprisoned 1534 at Fulham, starved; sent to Colchester, escaped [Fines]

Richard Johnson and Alice his wife had been persecuted for a long time in Salisbury. They were charged before John Stokesley in 1531 with possessing Wyclif's Wicket. 1570, p. 1190; 1576, p. 1019; 1583, p. 1047.

Richard Johnson and his wife were imprisoned at Fulham with Edward Freese. 1563, p. 494; 1570, p. 1168; 1576, p. 999; 1583, p. 1026.

 
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Anne Lacy

Widow. Of Nottinghamshire. Sister of Henry Lacy (by 1491 - 1564/65), MP, JP. [Bindoff]

Anne Lacy was driven to hide her Bible and other books in a dunghill. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2073.

Her brother was a justice but was of little help to her. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2073.

Queen Mary died before Lacy could be prosecuted. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1966, 1583, p. 2073.

 
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Barbour

Constable of Tibenham Long-row, Norfolk.

Mrs Crossman was persecuted for her denial of catholic doctrine. Barbour, constable of the town, searched unsuccessfully for her and her child in her house. 1563, p. 1699, 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2073.

 
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Henry Jolliffe

(d. 1573)

BD (1537 - 1538) [Cambridge]. Proctor of the University of Cambridge (1536 - 1537). Canon of Worcester (1542 - 1559). Dean of Bristol (1554 - 1559). Deprived of all ecclesiastical livings under Elizabeth. Fled to Louvain where he died. (DNB )

John Davis was visited by Henry Jolliffe and N. Yewer (both canons), who had in their possession his writings against the Six Articles and a ballad by him, to see if he admitted writing them, which he did. 1570, p. 2277, 1583, p. 2073.

[He and Robert Johnson refused to subscribe to the Articles of Religion propounded by John Hooper, bishop of Gloucester in 1552. He and Johnson held a public disputation with Hooper and with Harley.]

 
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John Davis

(b. 1535?)

Dwelling in the house of his uncle, Johnson, apothecary. Of Worcester.

In 1546 Davis, who often read an English Testament, was complained of by Alice Johnson, his mistress. 1570, p. 2277, 1583, p. 2073.

Alice Johnson consulted with Thomas Parton and Alice Brook (wife of Nicholas Brook, organ maker) and with certain canons, including Robert Johnson, chancellor to Heath. It was decided that Alice Brook's son, Oliver (a school fellow of Davis) feign friendship with him and so gain access to his writings. 1570, p. 2277, 1583, p. 2073.

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Oliver gained access to Davis's English books and writings against the Six Articles, which were then brought before the canons and Robert Johnson. 1570, p. 2277, 1583, p. 2073.

Thomas Parton apprehended Davis. 1570, p. 2277, 1583, p. 2073.

Davis was sent to prison, where he lay for around six weeks. 1570, p. 2277, 1583, p. 2073.

Richard Hawborough visited Davis in an attempt to persuade him to avoid burning. He burned one of Davis's fingers for some considerable time. 1570, p. 2277, 1583, p. 2073.

Davis was removed to the Peephole prison where the low bailiff, Robert Youle, bound his legs with heavy bolts. 1570, p. 2277, 1583, p. 2073.

Davis was often threatened while he was in prison by a madman who had a knife. 1570, p. 2277, 1583, p. 2073.

Davis's parents were too frightened to visit him in prison. 1570, p. 2277, 1583, p. 2073.

Davis was visited by Henry Jolliffe and N. Yewer (both canons), who had in their possession his writings against the Six Articles and a ballad by him, to see if he admitted writing them, which he did. 1570, p. 2277, 1583, p. 2073.

He was condemned by Robert Johnson. 1570, p. 2277, 1583, p. 2073.

His judges were Portman and Marven who, when they witnessed the boy's sorry state when he was held before them, agreed with John Bourne that the boy had suffered enough. 1570, p. 2277, 1583, p. 2073.

Bourne and his wife took Davis home and anointed his wounds but put him away when they realised he would not submit to their doctrine. They were afraid he might have an effect on their son Anthony. 1570, p. 2277, 1583, p. 2073.

Davis survived to become a minister under Elizabeth. 1570, p. 2277, 1583, p. 2073.

 
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Johnson

An apothecary. Of Worcester. Uncle of John Davis.

John Davis lived in the house of his uncle, Johnson. In 1546 Davis, who often read an English Testament, was complained of by Alice Johnson, his mistress. 1570, p. 2277, 1583, p. 2073.

When Thomas Parton came to apprehend Davis, his uncle was forced against his will to bind Davis's arms behind him. 1570, p. 2277, 1583, p. 2073.

 
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Mrs Crossman

Of Tibenham Long-row, Norfolk.

Mrs Crossman was persecuted for her denial of catholic doctrine. Barbour, constable of the town, searched unsuccessfully for her and her child in her house. 1563, p. 1699, 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2073.

Mary died before Crossman could be persecuted further. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2074.

 
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Mrs Roberts

Gentlewoman. Of Hawkhurst, Sussex.

Richard Woodman, after his condemnation, wrote a letter to Mistress Roberts of Hawkhurst.1563, pp. 1571-72, 1570, pp. 2194-95, 1576, pp. 1893-95, 1583, pp. 2002-03.

Sir John Guilford tried to force Mrs Roberts to go to church. 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2073.

Guildford sent his wife to persuade her to go to church. He later sent his servants and officers to hound her. 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2073.

Mrs Roberts fell ill after the hounding of Guildford and his assistants. 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2073.

When Guildford's servant climbed the stairs in Mrs Roberts' house to try to force her into church, his gout returned, making him unable to climb further and so pressure her. He did not return to persecute her. 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2073.

 
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N. Yewer

Canon of Worcester

John Davis was visited by Henry Jolliffe and N. Yewer (both canons), who had in their possession his writings against the Six Articles and a ballad by him, to see if he admitted writing them, which he did. 1570, p. 2277, 1583, p. 2073.

 
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Nicholas Brook

Organ maker. Of Worcester.

Husband of Alice Brook and father of Oliver Brook.

Nicholas Brook's wife used their own son in a plan to feign friendship with John Davis and so gain access to Davis's writings. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2073.

 
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Nicholas Heath

(1501? - 1578)

Bishop of Worcester (1543 - 1551, 1553 - 1555). Archbishop of York (1555 - 1560). Lord Chancellor (1556 - 1559). Descended from the Heaths of Apsley, Tamworth. [DNB]

Heath was deprived as bishop of Worcester under Edward VI; he was reinstated by Mary. 1563, p. 1053; 1570, p. 1678; 1576, p. 1432; 1583, p. 1505.

He was one of the commissioners who interrogated Robert Ferrar on 4 February 1555. 1563, p. 1732; 1570, pp. 1722-23; 1576, p. 1471; 1583, pp. 1553-54.

On 23 February 1555 the archbishop of York (Nicholas Heath) and the bishop of Chichester (George Day) went to the Counter to speak with Bradford. Heath was gentle towards Bradford when they met. Heath told Bradford that they had not been sent to him but that they had come out of love and charity. Heath knew Bradford better than Day did. 1563, pp. 1204-08, 1570, pp. 1794-97, 1576, pp. 1532-34, 1583, pp. 1615-17.

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A discussion about salvation and other things took place between Bradford and Heath and Day, which lasted three hours. 1563, pp. 1204-08.

Heath and Day left Bradford because the bishop of Durham was waiting at Master York's house. 1563, p. 1208.

Ridley was kind to Heath during Edward VI's reign. 1563, p. 1285, 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, p. 1717.

Philpot's fourth examination was in John Harpsfield's house before Bonner, Bath, Worcester [Heath] and Gloucester. 1563, pp. 1393-98, 1570, pp. 1965-68, 1576, pp. 1692-95, 1583, pp. 1799-1803.

Philpot's twelfth examination on 4 December 1555 was before Bonner, Worcester and Bangor. 1563, pp. 1434-37, 1570, pp. 1992-96, 1576, pp. 1715-17, 1583, pp. 1822-24.

During Philpot's twelfth examination, Worcester told Philpot that Durham and Chichester would be coming to speak with him. 1563, pp. 1434-37, 1570, pp. 1992-96, 1576, pp. 1715-17, 1583, pp. 1822-24.

Philpot spoke with Worcester, Wright and Chadsey later the same day. 1570, pp. 1993-94, 1576, p. 1717, 1583, pp. 1823-24.

Philpot's thirteenth examination was before York [Heath], Chichester and others. 1570, p. 1996, 1576, pp. 1717-19, 1583, pp. 1824-26.

The last examination of Philpot was on 16 December 1555 before Bonner and other bishops, including York. 1563, p. 1441, 1570, pp. 1997-98, 1576, p. 1719, 1583, p. 1827.

After Cromwell was apprehended, Bishops Heath and Skip forsook Cranmer and stood against him. 1570, p. 2040, 1576, p. 1759, 1583, pp. 1865-66.

Heath questioned Cranmer about his bill against the mass. 1570, p. 2047, 1576, pp. 1764-64, 1583, p. 1871.

Drakes, Tyms, Spurge, Cavell and Ambrose petitioned Heath over their long imprisonment. 1563, p. 1504, 1570, p. 2073, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

The receipt of a writ about Thomas Spicer, John Denny and Edmund Poole from Heath was delayed. 1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2093, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1912.

Robert Farrer was examined before the bishops of Durham and Worcester, Sir Robert Rochester, Sir Richard Southwell and Gilbert Bourne. 1563, p. 1732, 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2136.

On 15 December 1557 a letter was sent by the archbishop of York, the earl of Shrewsbury, Edward Hastings, Anthony Montague, John Bourne and Henry Jernegam (members of the privy council) to Bishop Bonner along with the examinations of John Rough. They sent Rough to Newgate. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2226, 1576, pp. 1921-22., 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

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Nicholas Heath was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

He was imprisoned in the Tower after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1993, 1583, p. 2101.

 
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Oliver Brook

Son of Alice and Nicholas Brook. Of Worcester.

Oliver Brook's mother insisted he feign friendship with John Davis and so gain access to Davis's writings. She hoped that this would cause Davis to be arrested for owning heretical books. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2073.

 
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Richard Howborough

Richard Hawborough visited John Davis in prison in an attempt to persuade him to avoid burning. He burned one of Davis's fingers for some considerable time before being convinced that Davis felt no pain. 1570, p. 2277, 1583, p. 2073.

 
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Richard Woodman

(at least 1524 - 1557)

Ironmaker. Martyr. Of Warbleton, Sussex. Imprisoned with John Philpot.

Woodman is mentioned by Story at Philpot's first examination as a 'fellow' of Philpot, loving scripture. 1563, p. 1390; 1570, p. 1962; 1576, p. 1689; 1583, p. 1796.

Woodman was apprehended for challenging Fairebank [once a married priest, of Warbleton] for preaching differently under Mary from what he had preached under Edward VI. 1570, p. 2171, 1576, p. 1875, 1583, pp. 1983-84.

He was brought before John Ashbornham, Master Tonston, Master Culpepper, and Master Roberts [all JPs for Sussex] who sent him to the King's Bench. 1563, p. 1573, 1570, p. 2171, 1576, p. 1875, 1583, p. 1984.

He remained in the King's Bench for over 18 months (from June 1557), from whence he was transferred by Story to Bonner's coalhouse, where he remained for one month before examination. 1563, p. 1573, 1570, p. 2171, 1576, p. 1875, 1583, p. 1984.

He answered courageously at his examinations. 1563, p. 1573, 1570, p. 2171, 1576, p. 1875, 1583, p. 1984.

He was released from Bonner on 18 December only to be re-apprehended, thanks to his father, brother, kinsfolk and friends. 1563, p. 1573, 1570, p. 2171, 1576, p. 1875, 1583, p. 1984.

He remained in the coalhouse for another eight weeks. 1563, p. 1573, 1570, p. 2171, 1576, p. 1875, 1583, p. 1984.

He was examined a further six times, making a total of 32 examinations before he was condemned. 1563, p. 1573, 1570, p. 2171, 1576, p. 1875, 1583, p. 1984.

Foxe records Woodman's account of his appearance before the sheriffs on 15 March 1556 and before the bishop of Chichester at Blackfriars, followed by his examinations. 1563, pp. 1574-76, 1570, pp. 2171-74, 1576, pp. 1875-77, 1583, pp. 1984-85.

Woodman's own brother delivered him to the authorities. 1563, p. 1574, 1570, p. 2171, 1576, p. 1875, 1583, p. 1984.

Woodman was married with children. 1563, p. 1574, 1570, p. 2171, 1576, p. 1875, 1583, p. 1984.

Woodman's neighbours were Cardillar and James Gage. 1563, p. 1574, 1570, p. 2171, 1576, p. 1875, 1583, p. 1984.

Gage and his men arrived at Woodman's house late at night to seize him, having already seized two of his children. 1563, p. 1574, 1570, p. 2171, 1576, p. 1875, 1583, p. 1984.

Woodman hid in a secret place in his house, after which his wife let the men who were searching for him enter. 1563, p. 1574, 1570, p. 2171, 1576, p. 1875, 1583, p. 1984.

Woodman was found. He tried to escape but fell into a hole and was captured by 'Parker the Wild'. 1563, p. 1574, 1570, p. 2171, 1576, p. 1875, 1583, p. 1984.

John Fauconer berated Woodman, saying that he was no angel (an accusation had been made by parishioners that he had said he was an angel). 1563, p. 1574, 1570, p. 2171, 1576, p. 1875, 1583, p. 1984.

Woodman's brother-in-law George Beching was worried that Woodman might have thought that he had betrayed him, but Woodman told him that he did not suspect him. 1563, p. 1574, 1570, p. 2171, 1576, p. 1875, 1583, p. 1984.

A pewterer from Lewes turned against Woodman. 1563, p. 1574, 1570, p. 2171, 1576, p. 1875, 1583, p. 1984.

Woodman's first examination before Christopherson, Story, Cooke and others took place on 14 April 1557. 1563, pp. 1573-79, 1570, p. 2174-78, 1576, pp. 1877-81, 1583, pp. 1986-89.

After his first examination, Woodman was taken by the sheriffs to Cooke's house, from whence he was taken to the sheriff's prison in Southwark. 1563, pp. 1579-82, 1570, p. 2178, 1576, p. 1881, 1583, p. 1992.

Woodman's second examination before Christopherson and two of his chaplains, as well as Story, took place on 27 April 1557. 1563, pp. 1582-87, 1570, pp. 2178-82, 1576, pp. 1881-84, 1583, pp. 2089-92.

Woodman's third examination was before Alban Langdale and Master James Gage at Montague's house, beside St Mary Overy's, Southwark, on 12 May 1557. Gage, the sheriff, was also present. 1563, pp. 1582-87, 1570, p. 2182-88, 1576, pp. 1884-89, 1583, pp. 1992-97.

Woodman's fourth examination took place before White (Winchester), Griffith (Rochester), a certain doctor and others on 25 May 1557. 1563, pp. 1596-99, 1570, pp. 2188-90, 1576, pp. 1889-90, 1583, pp. 1997-99.

Woodman's fifth examination took place before Winchester, Nicholas Harpsfield, Langdale, a fat-headed priest, and many others at St Mary Overy's church on 15 June 1557. 1563, pp. 1599-1601, 1570, pp. 2190-92, 1576, pp. 1890-92, 1583, pp. 1999-2000.

The sixth and last examination of Woodman took place before Chichester, Roper, Nicholas Harpsfield, the fat priest, Winchester and others. 1563, 1599-1601, 1570, p. 2192-94, 1576, p. 1892-93, 1583, pp. 2000-02.

Woodman wrote a letter to Mistress Roberts of Hawkhurst. 1563, pp. 1571-72, 1570, pp. 2194-95, 1576, pp. 1893-95, 1583, pp. 2002-03.

He was burned at Lewes on 22 June 1557. 1563, p. 1602, 1570, p. 2195, 1576, p. 1895, 1583, p. 2003.

 
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Robert Johnson

(d. 1558)

Prebend of Rochester (1541), Worcester (1544 - 1548), Hereford (1551 - 1558), York (1556 - 1558). Chancellor of Worcester diocese(1544 - 1558) (DNB)

In 1546 Davis, who often read an English Testament, was complained of by Alice Johnson, his mistress. 1570, p. 2277, 1583, p. 2073.

Alice Johnson consulted with Thomas Parton and Alice Brook (wife of Nicholas Brook, organ maker) and with certain canons, including Robert Johnson, chancellor to Heath. It was decided that Alice Brook's son, Oliver (a school fellow of Davis) feign friendship with him and so gain access to his writings. 1570, p. 2277, 1583, p. 2073.

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Oliver gained access to Davis's English books and writings against the Six Articles, which were then brought before the canons and Robert Johnson. 1570, p. 2277, 1583, p. 2073.

He was condemned by Robert Johnson, but his judges agreed with John Bourne that John Davis had suffered enough. 1570, p. 2277, 1583, p. 2073.

[He and Henry Joliffe refused to subscribe to the Articles of Religion propounded by John Hooper, bishop of Gloucester in 1552. He and Jolliffe held a public disputation with Hooper and with Harley.]

 
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Robert Yould [also Youle or Yowle]

Low bailiff of Worcester (1546); high bailiff (1548, 1552, 1559).

John Davis was removed to the Peephole prison where the low bailiff, Robert Youle, bound his legs with heavy bolts. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2073.

[Characterised by John Davis as a 'joly Catholik' (J. G. Nicholls, Narratives, p. 66)]

 
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Sir John Bourne

(1518 - 1575)

Secretary of State to Mary; uncle to Bishop Gilbert Bourne of Bath and Wells, [DNB, sub Bourne, Gilbert; Bindoff].

Sir John Bourne led a debate, or rather dinner conversation, with John Feckenham, against Nicholas Ridley while the latter was imprisoned in the Tower (1563, pp. 928-31; 1570, pp. 1589-91; 1576, p 1356-58; and 1583, p. 1426-28).

He was one of the commissioners who interrogated Rowland Taylor on 22 January 1555 (1563, pp. 1071-73; 1570, pp. 1696-97; 1576, p. 1450; 1583, pp. 1521-22).

He was one of the examiners of John Rogers on 28 January 1555 (1563, pp. 1026-28; 1570, pp. 1659-60; 1576, pp. 1416-17; 1583, pp. 1486-87).

He was one of the commissioners who interrogated Robert Ferrar on 4 February 1555 (1563, p. 1732; 1570, pp. 1722-23; 1576, p. 1471; 1583, pp. 1553-54).

He was ordered by the privy council to examine Sir Thomas Benger, Cary, John Dee and John Field on 5 and 7 May 1555 (1583, p. 1581).

Bradford was brought to speak to Bonner by the under-marshal of the King's Bench. Talk took place between the lord chancellor, Bonner and John Bradford on 22 January 1555, during which the bishop of Durham, Sir Richard Southwell, Sir Robert Rochester, and Secretary Bourne questioned Bradford's eucharistic doctrine. 1563, pp. 1185-88, 1570, pp. 1782-84, 1576, pp. 1522-23, 1583, pp. 1605-06.

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Secretary Bourne declared that Bradford had caused much trouble with letters, as had been reported to him by the earl of Derby. 1563, p. 1186, 1570, p. 1783, 1576, p. 1523, 1583, p. 1606.

Bourne asked Bradford if the letters were seditious, but Bradford claimed they were not. 1563, p. 1187, 1570, p. 1783, 1576, p. 1523, 1583, p. 1606.

Sir John Bourne is described by Foxe as the chief stirrer in such cases as that of Bartlett Green's. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1851.

A letter to Bonner by the privy council regarding Green's treason was written on 11 November 1555, but not delivered until 17 November. It was signed Winchester, Penbroke, Thomas Ely, William Haward, John Bourne, Thomas Wharton. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. , 1583, pp. 1851-52.

Lord Williams, Lord Chandos, Sir Thomas Bridges and Sir John Browne arrived in Oxford, prior to Cranmer's martyrdom. 1563, p. 1498, 1570, p. 2063, 1576, p. 1780, 1583, p. 1885.

Sir John Bourne was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

On 15 December 1557 a letter was sent by the archbishop of York, the earl of Shrewsbury, Edward Hastings, Anthony Montague, John Bourne and Henry Jernegam (members of the privy council) to Bishop Bonner along with the examinations of John Rough. They sent Rough to Newgate. 1563, p. 1646, 1570, p. 2226, 1576, pp. 1921-22., 1583, p. 2028 [incorrectly numbered as 2034].

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His judges were Portman and Marven who, when they witnessed John Davis's sorry state when he was held before them, agreed with John Bourne that the boy had suffered enough. 1570, p. 2277, 1583, p. 2073.

Bourne and his wife took Davis home and anointed his wounds but put him away when they realised he would not submit to their doctrine. They were afraid he might have an effect on their son Anthony. 1570, p. 2277, 1583, p. 2073.

 
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Sir John Guildford

(1508 - 1565)

Bailiff of Winchelsea and farmer of Higham, Sussex (1534 - 1565). JP Kent (1537 - 1538), sheriff (1552 - 1553). Chamberlain, household of Anne of Cleves (1546). (DNB and Bindoff)

Edward Benden talked with others of the parish of Staplehurst and then had his wife sent to Sir John Guildford, who sent her to back to prison. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1980.

Sir John Guilford tried to force Mrs Roberts to go to church. 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2073.

Guildford sent his wife to persuade her to go to church. He later sent his servants and officers to hound her. 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2073.

Mrs Roberts fell ill after the hounding of Guildford and his assistants. 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2073.

 
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Thomas Parton

Of Worcester.

Alice Johnson consulted with Thomas Parton and Alice Brook (wife of Nicholas Brook, organ maker) and with certain canons, including Johnson, chancellor to Heath, about John Davis's reading of an English testament. It was decided that Alice Brook's son, Oliver (a school fellow of Davis) feign friendship with him and so gain access to Davis's writings. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2073.

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[Shopkeeper. (See Nichols, Days of the Reformation, p. 61.)]

 
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William Taylour

John Davis was often threatened while he was in prison by a madman who had a knife. 1570, p. 2277, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2073.

[William Taylour was a madman confined in Worcester prison with John Davis in 1546. (See JG Nicholls, Narratives, p. 67.)]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Hawkhurst
Haukehurst, Haukhurst,Hawkhurst
NGR: TQ 757 306

A parish partly in the hundred of Henhurst, rape of Hastings, county of Sussex, but chiefly in the eastern division of the hundred of Barnfield, lathe of Scray, county of Kent. 5 miles south-south-west from Cranbrook. The living is a perpetual curacy in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Canterbury.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Stoke by Clare

Suffolk

OS grid ref: TL 745 435

 
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Tibenham
Tibnam Longrowe
NGR: TM 135 899

A parish in the hundred of Deepwade, county of Norfolk. 5 miles west-south-west from St. Mary Scratton. The living is a discharged vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Norfolk and Diocese of Norwich.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Worcester
NGR: NGR: SO 855 554

A city and county of itself, having exclusive jurisdiction, locally in the county of Worcester, of which it is the capital. Seat of the Bishopric of Worcester. 111 miles north west by west from London. The City comprises the parishes of St Alban, All Saints, St Andrew, St Clement, St Helen, St Martin, St Nicholas, St Peter and St Swithin. All in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Worcester. St Alban is a discharged rectory in the patronage of the Bishop; All Saints is a discharged rectory in the patronage of the Crown; St Andrew is a discharged vicarage in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter; St Clement is a discharged rectory in the same patronage; St Helen is a discharged rectory in the patronage of the Bishop; St Nicholas is a discharged rectory in the patronage of the Bishop; St Martin is a rectory in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter; St Peter is a vicarage in the same patronage; and St Swithin is a discharged rectory in the same patronage.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2097 [2073]

Queene Mary. Diuers saued by Gods prouidence from the fire, in Queene Maries daye.
MarginaliaAnno 1558.¶ Iohn Dauis, of the age of twelue yeares and vnder. 
Commentary  *  Close

This account is taken from Davis's own, much longer account of this episode, which he sent to Foxe and which survives among Foxe's papers (BL, Harley MS 425, fos. 69v-70r).

MarginaliaIohn Dauis a childe vnder the age of 12. yeares cast to be burned for the 6. articles and yet by Gods prouidence preserued.AN Dom. 1546. and the last yeare of King Henry the 8. Iohn Dauis,  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Addenda: ref page 554

This account is condensed from that of John Davis himself... It seems that Mr. Canon "Yewer" was Richard, and "Yould" should be Youle:these are corrected in the Index.

a child of xij. yeares & vnder, who dwellyng in the house of M. Iohnson Apothecarie, in þe toune of Worcester, his vncle, vsing sometymes to read of the testament and other good English bookes, was complained of by Alice Iohnson his maistresse, which Alice beyng an obstinate person, consulted with one Tho. Parton, & one Alice, wyfe to Nich. Brooke Organemaker, with certaine of the Canons, and M. Iohnson Chancellor to D. Heath their Bish. The meanes wherby he was entrapped, was wrought by the foresayd Alice Brooke, who procured Olyuer her sonne, schoolefellow with the sayd Iohn Dauis, to faine friendship with hym, and vnder pretence to be instructed, to see his English bookes, and especially to gette some thyng of his writyng against the vj. Articles. Which beyng had, was soone brought to the Canons of þe church, and the Chauncellor. Wherupon, Tho. Parton, whether beyng sent, or of his owne mynd, came to apprehend him, and his Vncle was forced agaynst his will, to bynde the poore boyes armes behynd him: and so hee was brought to the Officers of the towne, where he lay from the 14. of August, till the last of September. Then was he commāded to the Free mans prison, where one Rich. Howborough commyng to perswade him from burnyng, willed hym to prooue first with a candle, who then holdyng hys finger, and the other the candle vnder it a good space, yet (as the partie hymselfe to me assureth) felte no burnyng therof, neither would the other that held the candle beleue hym a great while, til he had looked, and saw no skorching of the candle at all appeared.

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Then was the child remooued from thence to an inner prison called Peepehole, where the lowe Bailiffe called Rob. Yould, layd vpon hym a paire of bolts, so þt he could not lift vp his small legs, but leanyng on a staffe, slipt thē forward vpon the ground, the coldnesse of which irons, he feeleth yet in his anckles, and shall so long as he lyueth, with these bolts, his lying was vpon the cold ground, hauyng not one locke of strawe, nor cloth to couer him, saue onely two sheepe skins, neither durst father nor mother, or any of his friends come at hym. Besides this and many great threates of the papists, there was a mad man put to hym in the prison, with a knife about hym, wherewyth he oft tymes in his frantike rage, profered to thrust hym in.

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After this came to him one Iolyfe,  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 554, line 3 from the bottom

This was doubtless Henry Joliff, "Educated at Cambridge, where he was sometime one of the Proctors. Afterwards being beneficed in Worcestershire he was prebend of Worcester and Rector of Bishop's Hampton. In 1554 he was made Dean of Bristol. He was concerned in Robert Johnson's answer to Bp. Hooper" (Dodd's Church History, i. 522), entitled "Responsio ven. Sacerdotum H. Joliffi et Rob. Johnsoni sub protest. ad Articulos Joh. Hopperi, Anverpiæ 1564. See Biographical Notice to Hooper's Latin Writings (Parker Soc.) p. xix, and Strype's Cranmer, II. 18, and notes, Eccles. Hist. Soc. Edition.

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and N. Yewer, two Canons, which had his writings against the sixe Articles, and his Ballet called Come downe for all your shauen crowne: to see whether he would stād to that he had written. Which done, with many great raging wordes, not long after sate M. Iohnson the Chancellour in the Guild hall vpon the poore lad. Where first were brought in hys accusers and sworne, then were sworn also 24. men which went on his Quest, and found hym guiltie, but hee neuer came before the Chancellor. Vpon this he was sent to the common Gaole among thieues and murtherers, there to tary the commyng of the iudges, and so to be had straight to execution. But the mighty mercy of the Lord, who helpeth the desolate & miserable when all other helpe is past, so prouided for this silly condemned lad, that the purpose of all his hard harted enemies was disappointed. For before the Iudges came, God tooke away Henry the 8. out of this lyfe. By reason whereof, the force of the lawe was then staied, howbeit, he was neuerthelesse arraigned, beyng holden vp in a mans armes at the Barre before the Iudges, who wer Portman and Maruen. Which when they perceiued that they could not burne him, would haue hym presently whipped. But M. Iohn Bourne Esquire declared to the Iudges how hee had whipping enough. After that hee had lyen a weeke more in prison, had hym home to hys house, his wyfe annoynted his legs her selfe with ointment, which then were stiffe and nummed with irons, till at length when M. Bourne and his wyfe sawe they could not winne hym to the beliefe of their Sacrament, they put him away, least he should infect their sonne Anthony as they thought with heresie.

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Thus Iohn Dauis of the age aforesayde, in what damage he was for the Gospell ye see, and howe the Lorde preserued hym, ye vnderstand. He endured in prisone from the 14. day of August, till within seuen dayes of Easter, who is yet alyue, and a profitable Minister this day in the Church of England: Blessed bee the Lord, qui facit mirabilia solus. 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Foxe text narrative.
Foxe text Latin

qui facit mirabilia solus.

Foxe text translation

Not translated.

Translation (Wade 2004)

who alone makes miracles.

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¶ Maistresse Roberts. 
Commentary  *  Close

The Sussex martyr Richard Woodman wrote a letter to Mrs Roberts.

MarginaliaThe Miraculous deliuerance of Mistres Robertes. MarginaliaThis Gentlewoman was a great succourer of the persecuted that came to her house, and specyally of good Woodman, whom ye heard of before, and to whom he wrote a letter, pag. 1893.FVrthermore to both these may also be associate another Gentlewoman to make the third, named maistres Robertes,  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 555, fn 1

This gentlewoman was a great succourer of the persecuted that came to her house, and specially of good Woodman, whom ye heard of before; and to her he wrote a letter.

yet liuyng and dwellyng (as I vnderstand) in the towne of Haukehurst in Sussex. She beyng earnestly addicted to the truth of Christes Gospell, and no lesse constaunt in that whiche shee had learned therein, so kepte her selfe duryng all the brunte of Queene Maries tyme, that she neuer came to their popish seruice, nor would pollute her conscience with hearyng their Idolatrous masse. There dwelt the same tyme not farre of, a Iustice called MarginaliaSyr Iohn Gilford a troubler of Mistres Robertes.sir Iohn Gilford, who beyng as feruent on the contrary side, to set forward the proceedyngs of Q. Mary, thought to prooue masteries with this Gentlewoman, in forcyng her to the Church. And first sendyng his wyfe, he attempted her by faire wordes and gentle perswasions to conforme her selfe to the Princes lawes, and to come as other christian people did, to the Church. Notwithstanding, she constantly persisting in the sinceritie of the truth, woulde by no perswasions be won to do therein against her conscience: and so kept at home a certayne space, till agayne the second tyme, Maister Gilford thinkyng not to geue her ouer so, sent his Officers and seruauntes to her, by force ond power to hale her out of her house to the church, and so dyd. Where by the way she for griefe of conscience swounded, and so of necessitie was brought home againe, and fallyng into an Ague, was for that tyme dispensed withall.

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The third tyme yet the vnquiete spirite of M. Gilford beyng not content, after the tyme that she recouered helth againe, would needes come his owne person to compell her, wild she, nild she, to come to Church. But (as þe Prouerbe goeth) who can let that God would haue done? MarginaliaSyr Iohn Gilford stopped of his purpose, by Gods working.For when M. Gilford had purposed as pleased hym, the Lord so disposed for his seruaunt, that as the sayde M. Gilford was commyng vp the staires toward her chamber, sodainly hys olde disease the Goute so tooke hym and terribly tormented hym, that he could goe no further: And so he that purposed to cary her to the church against her wil, was fayne hymselfe to be caried home to his house to hys payne, protestyng and swearyng that hee woulde neuer from henceforth trouble that Gentlewoman more, and no more he dyd.

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¶ Maistresse Anne Lacie.

MarginaliaMistres Anne Lacy.IN this number of good Gentlewomen beyng in trouble and danger for Gods word, is not to be omitted the memory of one maistresse Anne Lacie widowe in Notinghā shiere, who was in great danger in Queene Maries time in so much that the processe was forth against her, and she ready to haue bene apprehended, beyng so neerely pursued, that she was driuen to hide her Bible and other bookes in a dunghill. M. Lacy her brother was then Iustice of peace: but to whom (as I haue heard) she was but smally beholden. Neuertheles where kindred faileth, yet gods grace neuer fayleth such as sticke to hym: for in this mean tyme, as the processe came out against her, Queene Mary dyed, and so she escaped.

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¶ Crosmans wyfe.

MarginaliaCrosmans wyfe.ONe Crosmans wyfe of Tibnam longrowe in Norfolke, in Queen Maries tyme for not going to church was sought for at her house by one MarginaliaBarbour of Tibnam Constable, persecutor.Barbour of the sayde towne, then Constable of the hundreth: who whē he came to her house, shee beyng at home with a childe sucking in her armes, MarginaliaExample of Gods gratious prouidence.stept into a corner on the one side of the chimney, and they seeking the chambers, the child neuer cryed, (although before they came it did) as long as they were there, & so by this meanes the Lord preserued her.

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The congregation at Stoke in Suffolke. 
Commentary  *  Close

This account was first printed in Rerum, pp. 636-37.

MarginaliaThe story of a congregation at Stoke in Suffolke.THere were some likewise which auoyded the violent rage of the aduersaries by meanes onely of their number, and mutuall concord in godlinesse, wherein they dyd so holde together that without muche adoe none well could be troubled: whereof we haue example in a certain towne of Suffolke called Stoke. After the three sharpe yeares of Queene Maries persecution beyng past, yet notwithstandyng the inhabitantes of the towne aforesaid specially the women, came not to their Church to receyue after the Popish maner, the Sacrament. Who, if they had bene but fewe, they could by no meanes haue escaped imprisonment. But because there were so many, the Papists thought it not best to lay handes vpon them. Onely they

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