Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Alice Hurst

Sister of John and Jeffrey Hurst. Of Shakersley, Lancashire.

John Hurst was bound with his mother in the sum of £100 to betray the whereabouts of his brother Jeffrey and sister Alice. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

[See Christopher Haigh, Reformation and Resistance in Tudor Lancashire (Cambridge, 1975), pp. 172, 187, 192.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Edmund Hurst

(at least 1506 - 1556)

Labourer. Martyr. Of St. James's parish, Colchester.

On 6 June 1556 Darbyshire, Bonner's chancellor, read articles against Edmund Hurst (essentially the same as those against Thomas Whittle). He gave answers. 1563, pp. 1523-24, 1570, p. 2095, 1576, p. 1808, 1583, p. 1914-16.

Hurst signed a letter written with his fellow sufferers that berated Feckenham for preaching against them on 14 June 1556. 1563, pp. 1526-27, 1570, p. 2097, 1576, pp. 1809-10, 1583, p. 1916.

He was imprisoned at Newgate and burned at Stratford-le-Bow 27 on June 1556. 1563, p. 1525, 1570, p. 2097, 1576, p. 1808, 1583, p. 1916.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
George Eckersly

Protestant. Of Lancashire.

George Eckersly, along with Jeffrey Hurst, Henry Brown and Simon Smith, was asked to perform the duty of ensuring that the queen's proceedings took place. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Henry Brown

Protestant. Of Pennington, Lancashire.

Henry Brown, along with Jeffrey Hurst, Simon Smith and George Eckersly, was asked to perform the duty of ensuring that Queen Elizabeth's proceedings took place. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

He had a little boy in 1564. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

When his son was given two beads by Glave's wife, Brown threw them in the fire and complained to her about them. She then complained to the justice, Lelond, who chastised him and threatened him with prison. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Hurst

Brother of Jeffrey and Alice Hurst.

John Hurst was bound with his mother in the sum of £100 to betray the whereabouts of his brother Jeffrey and sister Alice. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

He asked Parkinson for one of his father's books. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

[See Christopher Haigh, Reformation and Resistance in Tudor Lancashire (Cambridge, 1975), p. 187.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Mistress Shakerley

Of Shakerley, Lancashire.

Mistress Shakerley was Jeffrey Hurst's mother's landlady. Thomas Lelond waited for her arrival before sending his priest, one of his men, and one of Mistress Shakerley's men to search the house for books. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

[This woman's name is also the name of the village in which she lived. It is possible this was a transcription error made by Foxe.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Mrs Glaves

Of Pennington, Lancashire.

When Henry Brown's son was given two beads by Glave's wife, Brown threw them in the fire and complained to her about them. She then complained to the Lelond, justice, who chastised him and threatened him with prison. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Mrs Hurst

Mother of Jeffrey Hurst. Of Shakersley, Lancashire.

Thomas Lelond spoke with Mrs Hurst during the search of her house for her son's possessions. He called her an old fool and threatened her with prison. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

Lelond asked Mrs Hurst where her son Jeffrey and daughter Alice were. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

Lelond had John Hurst bound with his mother in the sum of £100 to betray the whereabouts of his brother Jefrrey and sister Alice. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

[See Christopher Haigh, Reformation and Resistance in Tudor Lancashire (Cambridge, 1975), p. 208.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Ralph Parkinson

Minister. Of Shakersley, Lancashire.

Ralph Parkinson was sent by Thomas Lelond to search Jeffrey Hurst's home for books. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

Parkinson discussed Hurst's books with Lelond. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Simon Smith

Protestant. Of Lancashire.

Simon Smith, along with Jeffrey Hurst, Henry Brown and George Eckersly, was asked to perform the duty of ensuring that Queen Elizabeth's proceedings took place. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Lelond

JP. Of Lancashire. [See Christopher Haigh, Reformation and Resistance in Tudor Lancashire (Cambridge, 1975), pp. 187, 192.]

The Hurst house was searched under the direction of Thomas Lelond, justice, and Hurst's books were found, including Tindal's translation of the New Testament. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

Thomas Lelond spoke with Mrs Hurst during the search of her house for her son's possessions. He called her an old fool and threatened her with prison. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

Lelond had John Hurst bound with his mother in the sum of £100 to betray the whereabouts of his brother Jefrrey and sister Alice. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

Jeffrey Hurst was examined by Lelond. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2077.

Thomas Lelond continued to hold office in Elizabeth's time, when he rarely attended church. He blamed his lack of attendance on the fact that he was old. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

He kept Parkinson near to him and said that he could minister to him outside of church. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

When he did go to church the bells on the collar of his dog made a great din. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

Foxe recounts his habits at church. 1570, p. 2280, 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

Lelond died suddenly in his chair whilst talking with friends. 1570, p. 2280, 2300 1576, p. 1968, 1583, p. 2075.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Lancaster
Lancaster
NGR: SD 475 615

A borough and parish, having separate jurisdiction, partly in the hundred of Lonsdale, south of the sands, and partly in the hundred of Amounderness, both county palatine of Lancaster. 240 miles north-north-west from London. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Richmond and Diocese of Chester

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Morlese, Lancs
Morlese, Morlesse, Lancs
NGR:

Unidentified

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Pinington
Pinington
NGR:

Unidentified

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Shakerley
Shakerley
NGR: SD 693 022

A hamlet within the parochial district of Tyldesley in the hundred of west Derby, county palatine of Lancaster. 2.5 miles east-north-east from Leigh. The living (of Tyldesley) is a perpetual curacy in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Chester

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2100 [2076]

Queene Mary. Dyuers saued by Gods prouidence from burning in Qneene Maryes dayes.

MarginaliaAnno 1558.was layd in wayt for, and called hereticke, and Lollard, & so for feare of further daunger, he was compelled to leaue his wife and his child, and all, MarginaliaIeffrey Hurst leaueth wyfe, children, & house for persecution.and fled into Yorkeshyre, & there beyng not knowne did lead his life, returning sometimes by night to his house to comfort his wife, and bringing with him some preacher or other, who vsed to preach vnto them so long as the time would serue, and so departed by night agayne. MarginaliaPreachers vsing to Ieffrey Hurstes house and to Preach.The names of the Preachers were: M. Reneses, M. Best, M. Brodbanke, M. Russell, & euery time they came thither they were about 20. or 24. sometimes, but 16. at least, who had there also somtimes a Cōmuniō. And thus in much feare did he with other lead his life, till the last yeare of the reigne of Queene Mary. Thē it chaunced that the sayde Ieffrey Hurst, after the death of his father, came home, and kept himself close for vij. or viij. weekes.

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There dwelt not farre of at Morlesse, a certayne Iustice of peace and of quorum, named MarginaliaM. Thomas Lelond Iustice of peace at Morlese in Lancashire, a cruell persecutor.M. Thomas Lelond, who hearing of him, appoynted a time to come to hys Fathers house where he then dwelt, to rifle the house for bookes, and to search for him also, and so did. Ieffrey and hys company hauing knowledge of his comming, tooke the books which were in the house, as the Bible, the Communion booke, the new testament of Tindals translation, and diuers others, and threw them all vnderneath a tubbe or fat, MarginaliaIeffrey Hurst conueyed vnder a Drifat.conueying also the sayd Ieffrey vnder the same, with a greate deale of strawe vnderneath him: for as it chaunced they had the more time, because that whē the Iustice came almoste to the doore, he stayed and woulde not enter the house till he had sent for Hurstes mothers Landlady: MarginaliaMistres Slakerlay Hurstes Landlady.M. Shakerley, and then with her consent to go forwards. In the meane time, Ieffrey by such as were with him, was willed to lay in his window the testamēt of Tindals trāslation, and a litle booke conteining the third part of the bible, with þe booke of Ecclesiasticus, to try what they would say vnto them.

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This done, Mistres Shakerley came. Vnto whō eftsoones the Iustice declareth the cause of his comming and how he was sory to attempt any such thing agaynst any of her tenauntes for her sake, but notwithstanding he muste needes execute his office. And agayne you must (sayde he) note this, that a skabbed sheepe is able to infect a great nūber: and especially hauing, as he hath, so many brethren, & sisters, he is able to marre them all, if he be not looked vnto in time. And thus concluding, MarginaliaM. Lelond entreth to search Hurstes house.M. Lelond entred into the house, & being come in, set himselfe in a chayre in the midle of the house, and sending MarginaliaRafe Parkinson a Popishe persecuting Priest.Syr Rafe Parkinson his Priest, and one of his men, and one of Mistres Shakerleys men about the house, to searche and rifle the chestes for bookes (whiche so did) in the meane time he talked with Hurstes mother, being of the age almost of lx. yeares: And chiding with her that she would suffer her sonne so to order and behaue himselfe like an heretick, said: thou olde foole I know my selfe that this new learning shall come agayne: but for how long? euen for three moneths or foure monethes and no longer. MarginaliaThe Papists follow false Prophesies, of the Gospell to come againe after 4. Monethes and more.But I will lay thee olde foole in Lancaster dūgeon for this geare, and well worthy.

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Now as concerning the searchers, they foūd nothyng but latin books, as Grammer, and such like. These be not they that we looke for (sayde they) we must see further, and so looked into Hurstes chamber where they found the foresayd books. Then syr Rafe taking vp the testament, looked on it, and smiled. His Mayster seing that, sayd: nowe Syr Rafe, what haue we there? MarginaliaThe new Testament of Tyndalls translation made heresieForsooth, sayth he, a testament of Tindals translation, plaine heresy, and none worse then it. Then is all theyr goodes, sayth he, lost to the Queene & theyr bodyes to prison, and was wonderfully hasty: notwithstanding through Mistres Shakerley, for a space hee was content to see farther.

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Then the Priest looked on the other booke: What saye ye to that Syr Rafe, is that as euill as the other? No sayde he, but it is not good that they should haue such Englishe Bookes to looke on: for this and suche others, maye doe much harme. MarginaliaSearche made for Hurst and his sister Alice.Then he asked the Mother where her eldest sonne was, and her daughter Alyce? She aunswered she could not tell: they were not with her of long time before. And he swore by Gods bodye, MarginaliaThe olde mother threatned to goe to Lancaster Castle.hee woulde make her tell where they were, or he would lay her in Lancaster Dungeon, and yet he would haue them, notwithstandyng too, MarginaliaHurstes mother and brother bound in a 100. pound for his forth comming.To be shorte, for feare he hadde hys Brother Iohn Hurst and hys Mother bounde in an hundreth pounde to bring the partyes before him within xiiij. dayes, and so departed he, and the Priest put both the bookes in his bosome, and caryed them away with him. Then Iohn Hurst went after them, desiring that he mighte haue the booke which the Priest found no fault with: but he (sayd they) should aunswere to them both, and which so euer was the better, was not good.

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As this past on, when the time was come that Ieffrey Hurst and his sister shoulde be examined, MarginaliaMaster Lelonds maker.the Iustice sent for them betimes in the morning, & had prepared a masse to beginne withall, MarginaliaTalke betweene Ieffrey Hurst and the Iustice.asking Ieffrey Hurst if he would first go and see his maker, and thē he would talke further with him. To whom then Ieffrey answered and sayd: MarginaliaIeffrey Hurst denyeth to come to Masse.Syr my Maker is in heauen, and I am assured in goyng to your Masse I shall finde no edification thereby, and therefore I pray you hold me excused.

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Well, well, sayd he, I perceiue I shall finde you an hereticke, by God: but I will go to Masse, & I will not lose it for all your pratling. Then into his Chappell he went, and when masse was done, MarginaliaExamination after Masse.he sent for them, and caused his Priest to read a scrole vnto them as concerning the 7. Sacraments, & euer as he spake of the body & bloud of Christ, he put of his cappe, and sayd: loe ye may see: you will deny these thinges and care not for your Prince: but you shall feele it ere I haue done with you, & all the faculty of you, with other talke more betwene them, I know not what: MarginaliaIeffrey Hurst & Alice his sister, let go vnder suertyesbut in the end they were licensed to depart vnder suretyes to appeare agayne before him within 3. weekes, and then to go to Lancaster. Howbeit in the meane while it so pleased God, that within foure dayes of the day appoynted, MarginaliaIeffrey Hurst by the death of Q. Mary, released.it was noysed that the Queene was deade, and within xiiij. dayes after, the sayd Ieffrey Hurst fet home his 2. bookes, and nothing was sayd vnto him.

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MarginaliaIeffrey Hurst in Queene Elizabethes tyme put in authoritye to see the proceeding of Religion.It folowed after this that Gods word begon to take place, and the Queenes visitors came down into that coūtry, who did choose foure men in the parish: to wit, Simōd Smith, Ieffrey Hurst, Henry Browne, George Eccersly, which foure were Protestantes, to see the Queenes procedinges to take place: which according to theyr power dyd the same, notwithstanding it did little preuayle: & therfore the sayd Ieffrey being sore greued with the office, fell sick, in which sickenes it pleased God to call him, making a very godly end, God haue the prayse for it.

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MarginaliaThomas Lelond the Popishe Iustice, would not come to the Church in Queene Elizabethes tyme, & yet continued Iustice still.Nowe to returne to the foresayde Thomas Lelond agayne, he continuing in his office still, did very few tymes come to the Church, but sayd he was aged and might not labor, and there kept with him Syr Rafe Parkinson hys Priest, which could (as it was said) minister the Communion vnto the people, and sing Masse to his mayster: Yea and (as the same reported) did a pretyer feate then all that: MarginaliaA Catholicke father of the Popishe church.for he begat two children by a seruant in a house, hys mayster knowing it, and saying nothing, for that he would not lose his good masse Priest.

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MarginaliaNote a Catholicke knaue of a Popish Iustice.Furthermore, this was noted in the same Iustice Lelondes behauiour at seruice tyme, that he had a little dog which he would play with, all seruice time, and the same Dogge had a coller full of Bels, so that the noyse of them did molest and trouble others as well as himselfe, from hearing the seruice. Also in the same Iustice it was noted & obserued, that as he sate in his Chappell at seruice time, his maner was on a willow barke to knitte knottes, for that he could not be suffered to haue his beades, and to put the same vpō a string also. Witnes hereof Edward Hurst, with others. 

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This is a good example of a relative of a victim relating an incident of the Marian persecution to Foxe.

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MarginaliaThe trouble and escape of Henry Browne out of his enemyes handes.Furthermore, as concerning Henry Browne one of the 4. chosen men aboue mencioned, this is also to be added, that the sayd Henry Browne dwelling in the towne of Pinington in the same Parish an. 1564. had a litle boy, who as he was playing in the Towne, MarginaliaGlaues wyfe maintayner of Popery. and a persecutour.one Glaues wyfe gaue vnto the boye a payre of Beades made of woode, to play him withall. The little boy being glad therof to haye suche a trim thing, went home & shewed his father of thē. His Father seing the Beades, tooke them and burned thē, and when he had so done, went forth and asked who had geuen vnto his litle boy that payre of Beades.

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That did I, sayd Glaues wife.

Well sayd he, I haue burned them.

Hast thou so, sayd she? and thrust him from her. They shalbe the dearest Beades that euer thou sawest, & incōtinent went & cōplayned vnto the said Iustice, how Brown had burned her beades.

MarginaliaIustice Lelond writeth to the Constables to apprehende Henry Browne.This matter the Iustice tooke sore to snuffe, and was very angry, and did direct his letter vnto the constables of the same Towne, by his owne hand subscribed: the title of which superscription on the backeside was this: To the Cōstables of Pinington geue this.

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MarginaliaHenry Browne troubled for burning of Beades in Queene Elizabethes tyme.This done the Constables according to this their charge did bring him afore the Iustice at tyme appointed, and when the Iustece came to talke with him, he was in suche a chafe, that he called him theefe, and sayde that he had robbed his neighbour in burning of her beades, and that there was ringes and other Iuels on them, and that he might as well haue picked her purse: wherefore I will lay thee (sayd he) in Lancaster for this geare.

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Whilest they were thus talking, there came all hys

seruauntes
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