Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageLatin/Greek TranslationsCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Katherine Brandon

Duchess of Suffolk. (DNB)

Latimer preached in Stamford before the Duchess of Suffolk, in London in convocation and in the garden before King Edward at court. 1563, p. 1353, 1570, p. 1908, 1576, p. 1635, 1583, p. 1739.

Katherine Brandon was believed by Gardiner to be one of his greatest enemies.1570, p. 2283, 1576, p. 1971, 1583, p. 2078.

Gardiner sought revenge against Katherine first through her husband, Richard Bertie, by insisting that the sheriff of Lincolnshire bring Bertie before him. 1570, p. 2283, 1576, p. 1971, 1583, p. 2078.

Stampford gave a friendly report of Bertie. 1570, p. 2283, 1576, p. 1971, 1583, p. 2078.

Boner urged Bertie to make Katherine repent and then released him of his bond. 1570, p. 2284, 1576, p. 1971, 1583, p. 2078.

Katherine was the executor to the former duke of Suffolk's estate. 1570, p. 2284, 1576, p. 1971, 1583, p. 2078.

Bertie devised a plan to send Katherine overseas. 1570, p. 2284, 1576, p. 1971, 1583, p. 2078.

The emperor Charles V was owed money from the duke of Suffolk's estate. 1570, p. 2284, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

Bertie went overseas before his wife, who followed him shortly afterwards. 1570, p. 2284, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

Robert Cranwell, an elderly gentleman, travelled with Katherine and her daughter and others of her household when they went overseas. 1570, p. 2284, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

Foxe recounts her journey overseas. 1570, p. 2284, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

Gosling, a merchant of London, learned of Katherine Brandon's departure, and he was a friend of Cranwell's. He housed her as Mrs White and her daughter as his own daughter. 1570, p. 2284, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

She arrived in the duke of Cleves' dominion, where Francis Pernsell (Francis de Rivers) was minister. 1570, p. 2285, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

Master Perusell secured the protection of the magistrates for Bertie and Katherine. 1570, p. 2285, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

John Mason warned Bertie and Katherine that Lord Paget was on his way under a false pretence and that the duke of Brunswick was nearby in the service of the house of Austria against the French king. 1570, p. 2285, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

Bertie and Katherine departed for Windsheim, under Palgrave's dominion. 1570, p. 2285, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

The king of Poland offered Katherine Brandon and her husband assistance during their exile, at the request of John a Lasco. 1570, p. 2285, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

They devised with Barlow, former bishop of Chichester, to travel with him. 1570, p. 2286, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Lord Henry Wriothesley

(1505 - 1550)

Earl of Southampton. (DNB)

Lord Wriothesley was brought up with Richard Bertie. 1570, p. 2283, 1576, p. 1971, 1583, p. 2078.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richard Bertie

(1517 - 1582)

Of Grimsthorpe and Stamford, Lincolnshire. BA (1537). JP Kesteven and Holland, Lincolnshire (by 1564), Lindsey (1573). Sheriff of Lincolnshire (1564 - 1565) (Hasler).

Gardiner sought revenge against Katherine Brandon first through her husband Richard Bertie, by insisting that the sheriff of Lincolnshire bring Richard before him. 1570, p. 2283, 1576, p. 1971, 1583, p. 2078.

The sheriff took only a bond from Bertie of £2000 for his appearance before him. 1570, p. 2283, 1576, p. 1971, 1583, p. 2078.

Bertie appeared before Bonner and his sergeant Stampford. 1570, p. 2283, 1576, p. 1971, 1583, p. 2078.

Lord Wriothesley, late earl of Southampton, was brought up with Bertie. 1570, p. 2283, 1576, p. 1971, 1583, p. 2078.

Stampford gave a friendly report of Bertie. 1570, p. 2283, 1576, p. 1971, 1583, p. 2078.

Bertie was examined. 1570, p. 2283, 1576, p. 1971, 1583, p. 2078.

Boner urged Bertie to make Katherine repent and then released him of his bond. 1570, p. 2284, 1576, p. 1971, 1583, p. 2078.

Bertie devised a plan to send Katherine overseas. 1570, p. 2284, 1576, p. 1971, 1583, p. 2078.

Bertie was allowed to travel overseas. 1570, p. 2284, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

Bertie went overseas before his wife, who followed him shortly afterwards. 1570, p. 2284, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

Bertie took steps to secure his wife's safety until they could be reunited. 1570, p. 2285, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

Foxe recounts Bertie's journey to meet his wife. 1570, p. 2285, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

Master Perusell secured the protection of the magistrates for Bertie and Katherine. 1570, p. 2285, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

John Mason warned Bertie and Katherine that Lord Paget was on his way under a false pretence and that the duke of Brunswick was nearby in the service of the house of Austria against the French king. 1570, p. 2285, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

Bertie and his family departed for Windsheim, under Palgrave's dominion. 1570, p. 2285, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

The king of Poland offered them assistance, at the request of John a Lasco. 1570, p. 2285, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

They devised with Barlow, former bishop of Chichester, to accompany him. 1570, p. 2286, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

Bertie wrote letters to the earl of Erpach. 1570, p. 2286, 1576, p. 1972, 1583, p. 2078.

[Married Katherine, daughter of William, 11th Lord Willoughby, widow of Charles Brandon, first duke of Suffolk, in 1553.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Sir Francis Askew

Sheriff of Lincolnshire (1553 - 1554)

Gardiner sought revenge against Katherine Brandon first through her husband Richard Bertie, by insisting that the sheriff of Lincolnshire bring Richard before him. 1570, p. 2283, 1576, p. 1971, 1583, p. 2078.

The sheriff took only a bond from Bertie of ?2000 for his appearance before him. 1570, p. 2283, 1576, p. 1971, 1583, p. 2078.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Stampford

Bishop Bonner's sergeant.

Richard Bertie appeared before Bonner and his sergeant Stampford. 1570, p. 2283, 1576, p. 1971, 1583, p. 2078.

Stampford gave a friendly report of Bertie. 1570, p. 2283, 1576, p. 1971, 1583, p. 2078.

2102 [2078]

Queene Mary. Diuers deliuered by Gods prouidence from the fire in Queene Maries time.

MarginaliaAnno 1558.yng out of the Church and saluted him reuerently, declaring vnto him that he was moued of a good zeale & intent, somewhat to say vnto him. MarginaliaIohn Faber Bishop of Vienna persecutour.Faber was contented to talke with him.

MarginaliaObsequium amicos, Veritas odium parit. 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Foxe marginal note
Foxe text Latin

Obsequium amicos, Veritas odium parit.

Foxe text translation

Not translated.

Translation (Wade 2004)

Obedience produces friends, Truth produces hatred.

MarginaliaFaber gently admonished of Grinæus for his Sermon.Then Grinæus sayde vnto him that he was very sorry that a man of such learning and authority shoulde openly mayntein such errors as were both contumelious against God, & also might be refuted by the manifest testimonies of the Scripture. Irenæus writeth (sayd he) that Polycarpus was wont to stop his eares whensoeuer he heard any erroneous & wicked doctrine. With what mind then (thinke you) woulde Polycarpus haue heard you argue and reason what it is that the mouse eateth, when shee gnaweth the consecrated host? Who would not bewayle such ignorance and blindnes of the Church? With this Faber brake of hys talke, as he was about to saye more, and asked his name. This man dissembling nothing, gently tolde him that his name was Grinæus.

[Back to Top]

This Faber (as many well knew) was alwayes tymerous and fearefull in the company of learned men. Wherfore he fearing the learning, eloquence, and feruent zeale of Grinæus, specially in such a matter as this was, fayned as though he had bene sent for by the king, and that he had no leysure now to reason vpon this matter. He pretended that he was very desirous of acquayntaunce and longer talke with Grinæus, intreating him, that bothe for hys owne priuate cause, and also for the common wealth, he would come agayne the next day vnto him, and so shewed him his lodgyng, and appoynted him an houre when hee should come. Grinæus thinking that he had spoken vnfaynedly, promised so to do.

[Back to Top]

When he was departed frō Faber, he came straight way vnto vs, and was scarsly set at the table (for it was supper time) reciting a part of his talk with Faber vnto me and others there present, MarginaliaGodly warning sēt by an old man to Grinæus.when as I sitting with my company, was sodeinly called out of the Parler by a certayne auncient fatherly man, who shewing a singular grauitye in hys countenance, wordes, and behauior, spake vnto me & said, that the Sergeantes would by and by come vnto our lodging, being sent by the kinges commaundement, to carye Grinæus to Prison, whom Faber had MarginaliaGrinæus, accused, and pursued.accused to the Kynge, commaunding that Grinæus should straight wayes depart out of the towne, & exhorted me that we shoulde in no case delay the time: and so bidding me farewell, departed. But what olde man this was, neither did I know then nor afterward could vnderstand. I returning agayne vnto my company, bad them rise, and told them what the olde man had sayd vnto me.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaGrinæus warned to flye, escapeth.By and by, we taking Grinæus in the midst of vs, caryed him through the street to the Riuer of Rhene, whereas after he had stayd vpon the hether bank a while, vntil Grinæus with his companiō were caried ouer in a small boat, returning agayne to our lodging, we vnderstoode that the Sergeants had bene there, when we were but a little way gone out of the house. Now in what great daunger Grinæus should haue bene, if he had bene caried to prison, by this cruelty of Faber euery many easily may coniecture. MarginaliaGods mercyfull prouidence in defeating the cruell purpose of persecutors.Wherefore we indged that the most cruell entent and purpose of him, was disapoynted by Gods mercifull prouidence. And as I can not say, what olde man it was that gaue me that warning, euen so likewise the Sergeants made such quick speede, that except Grinæus had bene couered and defended by Aungels through the maruellous prouidence of God, he could neuer haue escaped.

[Back to Top]

Cōcerning the truth of this matter, there be many good men yet aliue, which both knowe the same, and also were present at the doing thereof. Therfore let vs geue thankes vnto God, which hath geuen vs his Angels to be our keepers and defenders, wherby with more quiet mindes, we may fulfill and do the office of our vocation.

[Back to Top]

With such like examples of Gods mighty and mercyful custody the church of Christ in all ages doth aboūd, as by manifold experiences may appeare as well among the Germanes, as also in all other places and ages, but in no place more, nor in time more plentifull, then in this persecuting time of Queene Mary in this our Realme of England: as partly hath bene already historyed, and parte yet remayneth (the Lorde willing) moreouer hereunto to bee added.

[Back to Top]
Lady Katherine Duches of Suffolcke. 
Commentary  *  Close

The flight of the dowager duchess of Suffolk into exile was mentioned in the 1563 edition, although it confusingly described her as 'Lady Francis', who was Katherine Brandon's stepdaughter (p. 1680).

MarginaliaThe olde hatred of Stephen Gardiner Byshop of Winchester agaynst the Duchesse of Suffolke.STephen Gardiner Bishop of Winchester, surmising the Ladye Katherine Baronesse of Willoughby and Cresby and Duchesse Dowager of Suffolcke, to be one of his auncient enemies, because he knew he had

deserued no betteer of her, deuised in the holy time of the first Lent in Queene Maries reigne, a holy practise of reuēge, first by touching her in the person of her husbād M. Richard Berty Esquyre, MarginaliaM. Rich. Bertie husband to the Duchesse, attached by the Byshop of Wynchester. for whom he sent an attachment (hauing the great seale at his deuotion) to the Sheriffe of Lincolnshyre with a speciall Letter commaunding moste straitly the same Sheriffe, to attache the sayd Richard immediatly, and without baile to bring him vp to London to his great Lordship. M. Berty her husband being cleare in conscience, and from offence toward the queene, could not coniecture any cause of this straunge prcesse, vnlesse it were some quarell for Religion, which he thought coulde not be so sore as the processe pretended.

[Back to Top]

The Sheriffe notwithstanding the commaundement, aduentured onely to take the bonde of M. Bertye with 2. sureties, in a thousand poūd for his appearance to be made before the Byshop on good Friday folowing, at which day M. Berty appeared, MarginaliaM. Bertie appeareth before B. Gardiner. the Bishop then lying at his house by S. Mary Oueryes. Of whose presence when the Byshop vnderstood by a gentleman of his chamber, in a great rage he came out of his gallery into his dining chamber, where he found a prease of suters, saying he woulde not that daye heare any, but came forth only to know of M. Berty, how he being a subiect durste so arrogantly set at light two former processes of the Queenes.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaTalke betweene B. Gardiner and M. Bertie.M. Berty aunswered, that albeit my Lordes wordes might seme to the rest somewhat sharpe towards him, yet he conceiued greate comfort of thē. For whereas he before thought it extremity to be attached, hauing vsed no obstinacy or contumacy, now he gathered of those wordes, that my Lord meant not otherwise but to haue vsed some ordinary processe: albeit in deed none came to his handes.

[Back to Top]

Yea Mary, quoth the Byshoppe, I haue sent you two subpenas, to appeare immediatly, and I am sure you receiued them, for I committed the truste of them to no worsse man but to Mayster Solicitour, and I shall make you an example to all Lyncolnshyre for your obstinacy.

M. Berty denying the receipt of any, humbly prayed his Lordship to suspend his displeasure & the punishment till he had good trial therof, & then, if it pleased him, to double the payne for the fault, if any were.

MarginaliaThe deuotion of B. Gardiner to good Friday.Well, quoth the Byshoppe, I haue appoynted my selfe this day (according to the holiness of the same) for deuotion, and I will not further trouble me with you: but I enioyn you in a thousand poūd not to depart without leaue, and to be here againe to morow at 7. of the clocke. M. Berty well obserued the houre, and no iote fayled: At whiche time the B. had with him M. Seriant Stampford, to whō he moued certayn questions of the sayd M. Berty, because M. Serieaunt was towardes the Lorde Wriothesley late Earle of Southhampton, and Chauncellour of England, with whom the said M. Berty was brought vp. M. Seriant made very frendly report of M. Berty of hys owne knowledge for the time of theyr conuersation together. Wherupon the Bishop caused M. Berty to be brought in, and first making a false trayne (as God would, without fire) before he woulde descend to the quarrell of Religion, he assaulted him in this maner.

[Back to Top]

Winch. MarginaliaM. Bertie attached for debt of 4000. poundes due to the Queene.The Queenes pleasure is (quoth the Byshoppe) that you shall make present payment of 4000. pound due to her father by Duke Charles, late husband to the Duchesse your wife, whose executor she was.

Bert. Pleaseth your Lordshippe (quoth M. Berty) that debt is estalled, and is according to that estallement, truly aunswered.

Winch. Tush (quoth theByshop) the Queene will not be bounde to estallementes, in the time of MarginaliaKette Captayne of the rebells in Northfolke in K. Edwardes tyme.Kettes gouernement, for so I esteme the late gouernement.

Bert. The estallement (quoth M. Berty) was appoynted by king Henry the 8. besides the same, was by speciall cōmissioners confirmed in king Edwardes tyme, and the Lord treasurer being an executor also to the Duke Charles soly and wholly, tooke vpon him before the sayd Commissioners, to discharge the same.

[Back to Top]

Winch. If it be true that you saye (quoth the Byshoppe) I will shew you fauor. But of an other thing M. Berty, I will admonish you, as meaning you well. I heare euill of your Religion: yet I hardly can thinke euil of you, whose mother I know to be as Godlye and Catholicke, as any within this Lande, your selfe brought vp with a mayster, whose education if I should disallow, I might be charged as author of his errour. Besides, partly I know you my selfe, and vnderstande of my frendes, enough to make me your frend: wherefore I will not doubt of you, but I pray you if I may aske the question of my Ladye your wife, is she now as ready to set vp the Masse, as she was lately to pull it downe, when she caused in her progresse, MarginaliaA Dogge clothed in a Rochet vnder the name of B. Gardiner.a dog in a Rochet to be caried, & called by name? or doth she think her

[Back to Top]
lambs
YYYYy.iij.
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield