Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Elizabeth Sands

(d. 1585)

Lady in waiting to Elizabeth during Mary's reign. Daughter of Anthony Sands of Throwley, Kent. [See Halser, Commons and BL Add. Ms.34563, fos. 17v, 20r, 21v, 23v.]

Elizabeth Sands refused to attend mass and so was banished by her father and risked jeopardy of further trial. 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2082.

She fled overseas and remained in exile in Geneva and Basle until the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2083.

Elizabeth Sands married Sir Morrice Berkley in 1562. 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2082.

[No relation to Edwin Sands.]

 
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Francis Mallet

(d. 1570)

Master of St Katherine's. Canon of Westminster (1554 - 1556). Dean of Lincoln (1554 - 1570) (Fasti).

In 1556, Dr Mallet asked Gertrude Crokhay why she would not let in St Nicholas. 1563, p. 1740, 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2145.

 
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Gertrude Crokhay

Wife of Robert Crokhay. Of St Katherine's, London.

Dr Mallet (now dean of Lincoln) asked Gertrude Crokhay why she would not let in St Nicholas. 1563, p. 1740, 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2144.

She answered for a child that was baptised by Thomas Saunders in a secret protestant baptism. 1563, p. 1740, 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2144.

She fled to Gelderland to the lands of her first husband, who was Gelder born. These lands were to come to her children. 1563, p. 1740, 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2144.

Coming home via Antwerp, Crokhay met with John Johnson, a Dutch shipper (alias John de Villa), who accused her of being an anabaptist. 1563, p. 1740, 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2144.

Crokhay was taken to prison in Antwerp.1563, p. 1740, 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2144.

Johnson lied and said that Crokhay's husband owed him money for a ship.1563, p. 1741, 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2144.

Crokhay witnessed the drowning of several of her fellow prisoners, and fear of the same fate made her ill, an illness from which she eventually she died. 1563, p. 1741, 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2144.

She denied, in Dutch, being an anabaptist and was eventually delivered out of prison and returned to England. 1563, p. 1741, 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2144.

When she was very ill, attempts were made by Drs Mallet and West to get her to recant and receive the church's rites, but she refused. She died on 13 April. 1583, p. 2144.

 
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Hugh Latimer

(1485 - 1555)

Bishop of Worcester (1535 - 1539). Martyr. Of Thirkeson, Leicester. [DNB]

Foxe relates Latimer's formative years. 1563, p. 1297, 1570, pp. 1903-04, 1576, p. 1630, 1583, p. 1730.

Hugh Latimer, the martyr, was the son of Hugh Latimer of Thirkeson, Leicestershire. 1563, p. 1297, 1570, p. 1903, 1576, p. 1630, 1583, p. 1730.

Latimer declaimed the work of Melancthon. 1563, p. 1297, 1570, p. 1903, 1576, p. 1630, 1583, p. 1734.

Foxe records a sermon Latimer preached at Cambridge in 1529. 1563, pp. 1298-1304, 1583, pp. 1731-35.

Foxe records another of Latimer's sermons, the subject of which was Turks. 1563, pp. 1304-07, 1583, pp. 1735-36.

Foxe records Latimer's sermon on how to play with certain cards. 1563, pp. 1298-1304, 1583, pp. 1731-34.

Buckenham, prior of the Black friars or Lady friars, attempted to show Latimer why scripture should not be in English by use of his cards. 1570, pp. 1903-04, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1734.

Dr Venetus, a Grey friar, berated Latimer in his sermons. 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1734.

Latimer's adversaries are listed: bishop of Ely (preached against him in King's College), Dr Watson (Master of Christ's College), Dr Norton (Master of Clare), Dr Philo (Master of Michael House), Dr Metcalfe (Master of St John), Dr Blith (of the King's Hall), Dr Bullock (Master of Queen's College), Dr Palmes (Master of St. Nicholas hostel), Bayne, Rud and Greenwood of St John's, Brikenden of St John's also, and said to have been a scholar of Latimer's. 1563, p. 1307, 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

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Henry VIII appointed Richard Stokesley (Bishop of London), Stephen Gardiner (Bishop of Winchester), Richard Sampson (Bishop of Chichester), William Repps (Bishop of Norwich), Thomas Goodrich (Bishop of Ely), Hugh Latimer (Bishop of Worcester), Nicholas Shaxton (Bishop of Salisbury) and William Barlow (Bishop of St David's) to compose a book of ecclesiastical institutions called the Bishops' Book. 1563, p. 1472.

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Dr West preached against Latimer at Barwell Abbey. 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

Barnes, prior of the Augustine friars, licensed Latimer to preach to the friars. 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

Articles were gathered out of Barnes' sermon against Master Tyrell, fellow of King's Hall, 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

Latimer would walk and talk on 'Heretykes hyll' with Bilney. 1563, pp. 1307-08, 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

Latimer went with Bilney to visit prisoners in the Tower in Cambridge. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1735.

Latimer and Bilney spoke to a woman in prison who was accused of killing her own child. Latimer spoke to Henry VIII after a sermon he gave at Windsor and tried to get the woman pardoned. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1735.

The woman gave birth to another child and Latimer became godfather, Mistress Cheek godmother. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1735.

Latimer and Bilney gave the woman spiritual counselling and eventually she was pardoned. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1735.

Dr Redman was an enemy of Latimer at Cambridge. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, pp. 1735-36.

Foxe includes a copy in English and in Latin of a letter Latimer received from Dr Redman, who revoked him for the doctrine he taught, along with Latimer's brief response. 1563, p. 1308, 1570, pp. 1905-06, 1576, p. 1632 [English only], 1583, p. 1736.

Latimer subscribed to articles after three years' teaching and preaching at Cambridge. 1563, p. 1309, 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1737.

Dr Buttes, the king's physician, housed Latimer while he was preaching in London. 1563, p. 1309, 1570, pp. 1905-06, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1738.

Latimer had been offered the benefice of West Kinton, Wiltshire, through the suit of Dr Buttes and Lord Cromwell. 1563, p. 1309, 1570, pp. 1905-06, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1738.

Latimer had been made bishop of Worcester, assisted by Cromwell and Buttes. 1570, p. 1907, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1738.

Latimer refuted Dr Powell's articles. 1563, pp. 1309-11, 1570, p. 1906, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1738.

Enemies of Latimer were Powell of Salisbury, Wilson of Cambridge, Hubberdin and Sherwood. 1563, p. 1311, 1570, p. 1906, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1738.

Latimer was called to appear before William Wareham (archbishop of Canterbury) and John Stokesley (bishop of London) on 29 January 1531. 1570, p. 1906, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1738.

The wording in Tonstall's register seems to suggest that Latimer did subscribe. 1563, p. 1334, 1570, p.1907 , 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1739.

Latimer was advanced to the post of bishop by Buttes and Cromwell. 1563, p. 1349, 1570, p. 1907, 1576, p. 1633., 1583, p. 1739.

Latimer told Morrice that the mayor had appointed him to preach at Easter. 1563, p. 1314, 1570, p. 1910, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1739.

Latimer prayed for Dr Wilson and his countrymen who disliked Latimer. 1563, p. 1317, 1570, p. 1912, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1739.

A friend of Latimer's told him that Wilson had gone to Beverley in Holdernesse and then on progress. 1563, p. 1317, 1570, p. 1912, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1739.

Latimer resigned his bishopric at the same time as Bishop Shaxton of Salisbury. 1563, p. 1353, 1570, p. 1907, 1576, p. 1634, 1583, p. 1740.

Articles were brought against Latimer. 1570, pp. 1926-28, 1576, pp. 1652-53, 1583, p. 1732.

Latimer was injured by a falling tree. He went to London for a remedy but was imprisoned in the Tower by the bishops in Edward's reign. 1563, p. 1353, 1570, p. 1908, 1576, p. 1635, 1583, p. 1738.

A justice in the diocese of Worcester bought land for his brother or for himself and and tried to have a poor man in the diocese damned. This man appealed to Latimer, who wrote to the gentleman about this. The gentleman later mended his ways and died prior to 1563. 1563, p .1353, 1570, p. 1908, 1576, pp. 1634-35, 1583, p. 1739.

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Latimer preached in Stamford before the duchess of Suffolk in London in convocation and in the garden before King Edward at court. 1563, p. 1353, 1570, p. 1908, 1576, p. 1635, 1583, p. 1739.

He prophecied that plagues would come in Queen Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1354, 1570, p. 1909, 1576, p. 1635, 1583, p. 1740.

He believed that preaching the gospel would cost him his life and that was why Winchester was imprisoned. 1563, p. 1354, 1570, p. 1909, 1576, p. 1635, 1583, p. 1740.

Articles were imputed to Latimer by Powell of Salisbury. 1563, p. 1654, 1570, p. 1906, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1739.

Hubberdin railed against Latimer and also railed against Luther, Melancthon, Zwingli, Frith, and Tyndale. Hubberdin danced in the pulpit. 1570, p. 1912, 1576, p. 1639, 1583, p. 1748.

On 4 September 1553, the privy council ordered Latimer to appear before them (1583, p. 1497 [recte 1409]; APC IV, p. 340).

On 13 September, Latimer appeared before the privy council and was committed to the Tower as a 'close prisoner' (1583, p. 1497 [recte 1704] - 1410]; APC IV, p. 345-46). [NB: Foxe did not reprint the description in the privy council register of Latimer's 'sedycious demeanour'].

Latimer was committed to the Tower on 17 September 1553 (1570, p. 1466; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1635). [Note that Foxe never corrected these inconsistent dates].

He was examined by Weston and the other members of the catholic delegation to the Oxford disputations on Saturday 14 April 1554 (1563, pp. 933 and 938; 1570, pp. 1593; 1576, p. 1935 [recte 1359]; 1583, p. 1430).

[There is a summary of Latimer's disputation on Wednesday 18 April 1554 which was printed in its entirety only in 1563, p. 934-35.]

Latimer disputed with Weston, Smith and the other catholic doctors on 18 April 1554 (1563, pp. 978-85; 1570, pp. 1622-27; 1576, pp. 1384-89; 1583, pp. 1454-59).

Latimer was summoned, together with Cranmer and Ridley, before Weston and the commissioners on 20 April 1554. He refused to recant what he had said during the disputations. He was condemned and taken in custody by the bailiffs (1563, pp. 935-36; 1570, pp. 1632-33; 1576, pp. 1393; 1583, pp. 1463-67).

He was brought out of the bailiff's house where he was being held, on 21 April 1554, to observe a procession in which Weston carried the sacrament and four doctors carried a canopy over Weston. Latimer, however, thought he was about to be taken to execution and urged one Augustine Cooper to make a fire that would burn quickly. When he came to Carfax and understood that he was being taken to view the procession, Latimer refused to look at it and ran 'to one Spensers shop' (1563, p. 936; 1570, p. 1633; 1576, p. 1393; 1583, p. 1464).

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Foxe mentions Latimer's condemnation and disputation in passing in 1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1399; 1583, p. 1469).

Bullinger sent commendations to Latimer, Thomas Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley in a letter to John Hooper dated 10 October 1554 (1570, p. 1692; 1576, p. 1444-45; 1583, p. 1518).

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Latimer, Thomas Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley from the Marshalsea(1570, pp. 1671-72; 1576, p. 1426; 1583, p. 1500).

The examination of Latimer and Ridley before White and Brookes took place on 30 September 1555. White and Brookes received their commission from Cardinal Poole. 1563, pp. 1297-98, 1570, pp. 1903-09, 1576, pp. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1757-60.

Latimer appeared at a second session with Brookes and White on 1 October 1555. 1570, pp. 1930-33, 1576, pp. 1758-59.

Ridley was cast into Bocardo prison with Hugh Latimer. 1563, p. 1285, 1583, p. 1718.

There was a conference between Ridley and Latimer in prison upon the objection of Antoman. 1563, pp. 1285-94, 1583, pp. 1718-24.

Grindal wrote to Ridley from his exile in Frankfort, to which letter Ridley replied. He mentioned his imprisonment with Cranmer, Latimer and Bradford. 1570, pp. 1901-02, 1576, pp. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1729-30.

Bullinger sent commendations to Latimer, Thomas Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley in a letter to John Hooper dated 10 October 1554. 1570, p. 1692; 1576, p. 1444-45; 1583, p. 1518.

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Latimer, Thomas Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley from the Marshalsea. 1570, pp. 1671-72; 1576, p. 1426; 1583, p. 1500.

John Bradford sent a letter to Cranmer, Latimer and Ridley. 1570, p. 1815 1576, p. 1551, 1583, p. 1634.

Rowland Taylor wrote a letter to Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley and Hugh Latimer when they were prisoners in Oxford. 1570, p. 2072; 1576, p. 1787; 1583, p. 1893.

Foxe relates the behaviour of Ridley and Latimer at their martyrdom. 1563, pp. 1376-79, 1570, pp. 1937-39, 1576, pp. 1661-62, 1583, p. 1769.

Foxe records Ridley's lamentation for a change in religion, in which Ridley makes reference to Latimer, Lever, Bradford and Knox, as well as Cranmer and their part in the duke of Somerset's cause. 1570, pp. 1945-50, 1576, pp. 1670-78, 1583, pp. 1778-84.

Cranmer was examined by Bonner and Ely and condemned on 12 September 1556 (seven days before the condemnation of Ridley and Latimer). 1563, pp. 1491-92, 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Letters. 1563, pp. 1314-17, 1321-25, 1333-34, 1344-48, 1349-53, 1570, pp. , 1576, pp. , 1583, pp. 1736-37, 1741-42, 1745-56.

Hugh Latimer presented a new year's gift to Henry VIII. 1563, p. 1734.

Foxe includes one of Latimer's card sermons. 1583, p. 2142.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Brice

Protestant exile under Mary who returned home.

Thomas Brice came home from Wesel with his elder brother John to their father's house and intended to warn Springfield of the danger nearly upon him, when they themselves came close to capture. Servants at an inn allowed them to escape through a secret passage and take a barge out of town. Springfield successfully avoided capture also. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

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[Thomas Brice had two older brothers called John. See F. G. Emmison, ed., Essex Wills 1558 - 1565 (Washington DC, 1982), no.486. It is impossible to say which John Brice this is.]

 
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John Johnson

A Dutch shipper.

Coming homeward via Antwerp, Gertrude Crokhay met with John Johnson who accused her of being an anabaptist. 1563, p. 1740, 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2082.

[Alias John de Villa]

 
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John Seal

Protestant sympathiser. Of Horting.

Thomas Brice was in the house of John Seal, in Horting, when the bailiff and others, at the commandment of Sir John Baker, were sent to search for him. They knew his stature and the colour of his garments yet somehow did not recognise him and so he escaped. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

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Robert Horneby

Gentleman. Servant and groom to Elizabeth during Mary's reign.

Robert Horneby was examined by the privy council about his religion in April 1555, and was then imprisoned in the Marshalsea. 1583, p. 1561.

Horneby was committed to the Marshalsea for refusing to attend mass. 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2082.

He was delivered from condemnation by Dr Martin. 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2082.

[Horneby fled into exile, appearing in Frankfurt by 1577 (Garrett, Marian Exiles).]

[See C. S. Knighton, Calendar of State Papers Domestic, Mary I, no.816 and Acts of the Privy Council 5, p. 119.]

 
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Sir John Baker

(1490? - 1558)

Chancellor of the Exchequer, privy councillor, undersheriff and sheriff of the court of London. MP for Bedford and the City of London. [DNB; Bindoff)]

Sir John Baker believed Bland to be Scottish, but Bland told him he was English, from Sedbar and brought up by Dr Lupton, the provost of Eton.1563, p. 1223, 1570, p. 1847, 1576, p. 1581, 1583, p. 1668.

Sir John Baker and Bland held a conversation over Bland's beliefs 1563, pp. 1223-24, 1570, pp. 1847-48, 1576, p. 1581, 1583, pp. 1668-69.

Bland was taken before Sir John Baker, Master Petit, Master Webbe, and two others whose identity was unknown to Bland. 1563, p. 1223, 1570, p. 1847, 1576, p. 1581, 1583, p. 1668.

Complaints about Richard Turner's sermons were made to Sir John Baker, Sir Christopher Hales, Sir Thomas Moyles. 1570, p. 2043, 1576, p. 1762, 1583, p. 1869.

John Tailor and Thomas Henden complained to the justices about Edmund Allin and he was brought before Sir John Baker. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

John Baker allowed Allin and his wife to spend a night together, during which they decided not to go to chapel and to die together. 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896.

Sir John Baker committed Allin and his wife to ward but for some reason they were later released. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

John Tailor sent the Allins before Sir John Baker for a second time. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

The Allins were sent to Maidstone prison by Sir John Baker. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

Sir John Baker sent John Dove, Thomas Best, Thomas Linley, Percival Barber, John Tailor and Thomas Henden to the Allins' home to make an inventory of their goods. 1570, p. 2165, 1576, p. 1870, 1583, p. 1979.

Talk took place between Sir John Baker, Collins (his chaplain) and Edmund Allin. 1570, pp. 2165-66, 1576, pp. 1870-71, 1583, pp. 1979-80.

Sir John Baker called Mrs Allin a whore for persuading her husband not to go to chapel. 1570, p. 2197, 1576, p. 1896.

Thomas Brice was in the house of John Seal, in Horting, when the bailiff and others, at the commandment of Sir John Baker, were sent to search for him. They knew his stature and the colour of his garments yet somehow did not recognise him and so he escaped. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

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Robert Farrer talked with Laurence Sheriff in the Rose tavern and suggested to Sheriff that Elizabeth had been involved in Wyatt's rebellion. Sheriff complained to Bonner about Farrer before Mordaunt, Sir John Baker, Darbyshire, Story, Harpsfield, and others. 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1988, 1583, p. 1980.

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Springfield

Protestant. Confessional ally of Thomas and John Brice.

Thomas Brice came home from Wesel with his elder brother John to their father's house and intended to warn Springfield of the danger nearly upon him, when they themselves came close to capture. Servants at an inn allowed them to escape through a secret passage and take a barge out of town. Springfield successfully avoided capture also. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1974 [incorrectly numbered as 1938], 1583, p. 2081.

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Thomas Martin

(d. 1597?)

Of Winterbourne St Martin, Dorset; Steeple Morden, Cambridge and London. DCL (1555), LLD (1587). MP Saltash (1553), Hindon (1554 and 1555), Ludgershall (1558). Chancellor to Stephen Gardiner by 1554. Commr. Visit Oxford University (1555), collect surveys and acct. religious houses (1556), heresy (1557), heretical books (1557). [Bindoff]

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Thomas Martin was one of the recipients of the proclamation from Philip and Mary authorising the persecution of protestants. 1563, p. 1561, 1570, p. 2155, 1576, p. 1862, 1583, p. 1974[incorrectly numbered 1970].

Thomas Martin searched John Hooper's room in the Fleet. 1563, p. 1056; 1570, pp. 1679-80; 1576, p. 1433; 1583, p. 1507.

George Tankerfield was sent into Newgate by Roger Cholmey and Dr Martin. 1563, p. 1251, 1570, p. 1869, 1576, p. 1600, 1583, p. 1689.

Cranmer was examined by Brookes, Martin and Story. 1563, pp. 1479-83, 1570, pp. 2046-47, 1576, p. 1764-65, 1583, p. 1871.

A new commission was sent to Rome for the restoration of the pope's authority to allow the condemnation of Cranmer. Those sent were: James Brookes, Martyn and Story . 1570, p. 2047, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Foxe records Martyn's oration against Cranmer. 1570, pp. 2049-50, 1576, pp. 1767-68, 1583, p. 1874.

A talk took place between Cranmer and Martyn while Cranmer was in prison. 1576, pp. 1770-71, 1583, pp. 1876-77.

Martyn had demanded to know who Cranmer thought was supreme head of the church of England. 1570, p. 2058, 1576, p. 1775, 1583, p. 1881.

John Careless' first examination was before Dr Martin, marshall of the King's Bench [Sir William Fitzwilliam - DNB + Hasler / Bindoff], Dr Martin's scribe and an unspecified priest in the lord chancellor's house. 1563, pp. 1529-35, 1570, pp. 2101-02, 1576, pp. 1813-14, 1583, pp. 1919-20.

Elizabeth Young's second examination was before Dr Martin. 1570, p. 2269, 1576, p. 1959, 1583, p. 2066.

Her third examination took place before Martin. 1570, pp. 2269-70, 1576, p. 1959, 1583, p. 2066.

Her fourth examination was before Bonner, Roger Cholmley, Cooke, Dr Roper of Kent, and Dr Martin. 1570, pp. 2270-71, 1576, pp. 1959-60, 1583, pp. 2066-67.

When Alexander Wimshurst arrived at St Paul's, he saw Chedsey, his old acquaintance at Oxford, and said to him that he would rather be examined by Martin than by anyone else. 1570, p. 2276, 1576, p. 1965, 1583, p. 2072.

Robert Horneby was delivered from condemnation by Dr Martin. 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2082.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Rose

'M. Rose' was arrested, along with a congregation of 30 people for whom he was celebrating communion, in the churchyard of St Mary-le-Bow, on 1 January 1555 (1570, p. 1652; 1576, p. 1409; 1583, p. 1480; cf. 1563, p. 1020).

On 3 January 1554, Rose was brought before Stephen Gardiner, informally examined, and then sent to the Tower (1570, p. 1652; 1576, p. 1409; 1583, p. 1480).

Rose's secret conventicle was discussed in Parliament in 1555. They had prayed that God turn Mary's heart from idolatry or shorten her days. Parliament decreed that certain 'evill prayers' would be treason (1570, p. 1654; 1576, p. 1411; 1583, pp. 1481-82).

A letter was sent to Hooper describing the arrest of Rose and his congregation; the letter is dated 3 January 1555 (1563, p. 1020).

Hooper wrote an answer to this letter (1563, p. 1020; LM, p. 120; 1570, p. 1654; 1576, p. 1411; 1583, p. 1482).

Hooper also sent a letter of encouragement to the members of Rose's congregation imprisoned in the Counter in Bread Street (1563, pp. 1021-22; , pp. 121-23; 1570, pp. 1654-55; 1576, pp. 1411-12; 1583, pp. 1482-83).

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Saunders

Of St Katherine's, London.

Thomas Saunders' child was given a secret protestant baptism. 1570, p. 2287, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2082.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Mauldon

Under seventeen years of age.

In the time of the Six Articles, William Mauldon was beaten by his father for his protestant beliefs. He was examined by the priest and his books searched for. 1563, p. 1741, 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2145.

The priest wrote a letter about Mauldon to the bishop, but the letter was burned by another priest. Mauldon predicted the coming reformation. 1563, p. 1741, 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1975, 1583, p. 2145.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Cambridge (Grantbridge)

[Cambrige; Grantbrige; Grantebryge]

OS grid ref: TL 465 585

County town of Cambridgeshire and university town

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Exmouth
Exmouth
NGR: SY 005 185

Not identified

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Gadshill
Gaddes Hill, Gaddes hyll
NGR: TQ 713710

Not identified, suggest:

Gadshill - TQ 713 710

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Gravesend
Grauesend
NGR: TQ 654 745

Not identified

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Hadleigh
Hadley
NGR: TM 026 425

A parish in the hundred of Cosford, county of Suffolk. 10.5 miles west by south from Ipswich. The living is a rectory within the exempt Deanery of Bocking, in the peculiar jurisdiction and patronage of the Archbishop of Canterbury.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Hampton Court
Hampton Court, Hampton Courte
NGR: TQ 166 681

Royal palace and peculiar. 2.5 miles south of Richmond

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Horting
Horting
NGR:

Unidentified

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Luton
Luton
NGR: TL 094 214

A parish in the hundred of Flitt, county of Bedford. 20 miles south by east from Bedford, 31 miles north-west by north from London. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Bedford and Diocese of Lincoln

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Polstead
Polsted
NGR: TL 992 382

Not identified

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2106 [2082]

Queene Mary. Dyuers saued by Gods prouidence from burning in Qneene Maryes dayes.

MarginaliaAnno 1558.ble experience of the Lordes mightye power and helpyng hand working for him? What shoulde I here speake of the myraculous deliueraunce of Thomas Bryce, who being in the house of Iohn Seale, in the parish of Horting, and the Bayliffe with other neighbours comming in, sent by Sir Iohn Baker to search and apprehend hym, & knowing perfectly both hys stature and colour of his garments yet had no power to see or know him standing before their faces. MarginaliaGod blynded the eyes of them which sought for Thomas Bryce, that they could not see him.So mightely the Lorde did blinde their eyes, that they asking for him, and looking vpon him, yet notwithstanding he quietly tooke vpp his bagge of books, and so departed out of the house, wythout anye hand layd vpon him.

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MarginaliaAn other story of Thomas Brice and his brother.Also an other time, about the 2. yeare of Queene Mary, the sayde Thomas Bryce, with Iohn Bryce his elder brother, comming then from Wesell, meeting together at their fathers house, as they iornyed towardes London to geue warning there to one Springfield, whiche els was like to bee taken vnawares by his enemies wayting for him vpon Gaddes hill, fell in company with a promoter, which dogged them and followed them again to Grauesend, into the towne, and layed the house for them where they were, and all the waies as they should go to the water side: so that it had not bene possible for them to haue auoyded the present daunger of those persecutors, MarginaliaThomas & Iohn Bryce deliuered by Gods good meanes and protection.had not the Lordes prouident care otherwise disposed for hys seruauntes through the Hostler of the Inne, couertly to conuey them by a secret passage: whereby they tooke Barge a mile out of the towne, and so in the ende both the liues of them, and also of Springfield was preserued, through the Lordes gracious protection.

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¶ Gertrude Crockhey. 
Commentary  *  Close

See 1583, pp. 2145-46.

MarginaliaThe trouble and deliueraunce of Gertrude Crokehay.Gertrude Crokehey dwelling at S. Katherines by the Towne of London, and being then in her husbandes house, it happened, in the yeare 1556. that the Popes childish S. Nicholas went about the parish. Whiche shee vnderstanding, shut her dore agaynst him, not suffering him to enter into her house.

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MarginaliaThis Doct. Mallet is now Deane of Lincolne.Then Doct. Mallet hearing thereof, and being then Mayster of the S. Katherines, the next daye came to her wyth twenty at hys tayle, thinking belike to fray her, and asked why shee woulde not the night before let in S. Nicolas and receaue hys blessing. &c. To whom she aunswered thus. Syr I knowe no S. Nicholas (sayd she) that came hether. Yes quoth Mallet, here was one that represented S. Nicolas.

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In deede sir (sayd she) here was one þt was my neighbours childe, but not S. Nicolas: for S. Nicholas is in heauen. I was afrayde of them that came with him to haue had my purse cut by them: for I haue hearde of men robbed by S. Nicolas clerkes. &c. So Mallet perceiuyng that nothing could be gotten at her handes, went his way as he came, and she for that time so escaped.

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MarginaliaAn other trouble of the sayde Gertrude in Dutchland.Then in the yeare 1557. a little before Whitsontide, it happened that the sayde Gertrude aunswered for a childe that was baptised of one Thomas Saunders, whyche childe was christened secretly in a house after the order of þe seruice booke in king Edwardes time, and that beyng shortly knowne to her enemies, she was sought for. Whiche vnderstanding nothing therof, went beyond the Sea into Gilderland, to see certayne landes that should come to her children in the right of her first husband, who was a straunger borne, & being there about a quarter of a yeare at the lengthe comming homeward by Andwarpe, shee chaunced to meete with one Iohn Iohnson a Ducth manne alias Iohn de Villa of Andwerpe shipper  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 579, line 3 from the bottom

All the old Editions, even 1563, read "shipper;" but this is no doubt a misprint for "schipper" (Dutch) or "skipper." (See Todd's Johnson.)

who seeing her there, went of malice to the Margraue, and accused her to be an Anabaptist: whereby shee was taken and caryed to prison. The cause why this naughty manne did thus, was for that he claymed of M. Crokhay her husband a peece of mony whiche was not his due, for a ship þt Mayster Crokhay bought of him, and for that hee coulde not get it, he wrought this displeasure. Well, she being in prison, lay there a fortnight. MarginaliaCruelty in Flaunders vsed secretly agaynst the Christians.In the whiche time she sawe some that were prisoners there, who priuily were drowned in Renish wine fattes, and after secretly put in sackes and cast into the Riuer. Now she, good woman, thinking to be so serued, tooke thereby such feare that it brought the begynning of her sickenesse, of the whiche at length she dyed.

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Then at the last was she called before the Margraue and charged with Anabaptistry: whiche shee there vtterly denyed, and detested the error, declaring before hym in Dutch her fayth boldly, wythout any feare. So the Margraue hearyng the same, in the end beyng well pleased wt

her profession, at þe sute of some of her frends, deliuered her out of prison, but tooke away her booke, MarginaliaGertrude returneth into England.and so shee came ouer into England agayne.

¶ William Mauldon. 
Commentary  *  Close

This is an abriged account of Maldon's description of the episode which survives in Foxe's papers: BL, Harley MS 590, fo. 77r-v.

MarginaliaA story of William Mauldon.I Lightly pase ouer here the tedious afflictious of William Mauldon, how in the daungerous time of the 6. articles, before the burning of Anne Askew, MarginaliaW. Mauldon, accused and scourged for true religion.hee was scourged being young, of his father, for professing and confessing of true Religion: and afterward being examined in auricular confession by the Priest, hys bookes were searched for, and so at length hee was presented vp by þe same Priest in a letter written to the Byshop. Which letter, had it not bene burned by an other Priest to whose handes it came (as the Lord would haue it) it had vndoubtedly cost hym his life.

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This one thinge in the sayde William Mauldon is to bee noted, that being younge, in those dayes of kinge Henry, when the masse most florished, the aultars wyth the sacrament therof being in their moste high veneration þt to mans reason it might seeme vnpossible that the glory and opinion of that Sacramente and Sacramentalles, so highly worshipped, and so deepely rooted in the hartes of so many, could by any meanes possible so soone decay and vanish to naught: MarginaliaThe Prophesie of M. Mauldon in K. Henryes tyme, for the fall of Masse and Sacrament of the Aultar.yet notwithstanding hee being then so young, vnder the age of xvii. yeares, by the spirite (no doubt) of prophesie, declared then vnto his parentes, that they should see it shortly euen come to passe, that both the Sacrament of the altar and the altars themselues, with al such plantations which the heauenly father did not plant, should be plucked vp by the rootes: and euen so within the space of very fewe yeares the euent thereof followed accordingly: the Lorde therefore bee praysed for his moste gratious reformation.

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¶ Robert Horneby. 
Commentary  *  Close

This account reprints a note in Foxe's handwriting (BL, Harley MS 419, fo. 137r). On Horneby and this account see Thomas S. Freeman, '"As True a Subiect being Prysoner": John Foxe's Notes on the Imprisonment of Princess Elizabeth', English Historical Review 117 (2002), pp. 106-07.

MarginaliaRobert Horneby through Gods working preserued.I Let passe lykewise the daungerous escape of Robert Horneby, seruaunt sometyme and groome of the Chamber to Ladye Elizabeth, shee being then in trouble in Queene Maryes dayes: who being willed to come to Masse, refused so to doe, and therefore comming afterward from Woodstocke to Hampton Courte, was called before the Counsayle, & by them committed to the Marshalsey, and not vnlyke to haue susteyned further daunger, had not the Lordes goodnes better prouided for him, who at length by Doctour Martyn was deliuered.

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¶ Mistres Sandes. 
Commentary  *  Close

This account reprints a note in Foxe's handwriting (BL, Harley MS 419, fo. 137r). On Sandes and this account see Thomas S. Freeman, "'As True a Subiect being Prysoner": John Foxe's Notes on the Imprisonment of Princess Elizabeth', English Historical Review 117 (2002), pp. 107-08 and 110.

MarginaliaMistres Sandes, now Lady Bartlet, preserued from persecution.THe lyke also may be testified and recorded of Mistres Sandes, nowe wyfe to Syr Morice Bartlet, 

Commentary  *  Close

I.e., Sir Maurice Berkely of Bruton, Somerset. Elizabeth Sandes married him in 1562.

then Gentlewooman wayter to the sayde Ladye Elizabeth being in the Tower. Which Mistres Sandes denyed in lyke maner to come to Masse, and therefore beside the heauye displeasure of her father was not onely displaced from her roume, and put out of the house, but also was in greate ieopardye of further tryall. But the Lorde who disposeth for euery one as he seeth beste, wroughte her way out of her enemyes handes by flying ouer the Seas, where shee continued amongest other banished exiles in the Cittye of Geneua & of Basil, till the death of Queene Marye.

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The storye of Thomas Rose yet liuing, a Preacher, of the age of lxxvi. yeares, in the towne of Luton, and Countye of Bedford. 
Commentary  *  Close
Rose, Kemp and Sandys

The next three accounts of 'miraculous' preservations of godly people from danger have three things in common. In the first place, they are each invaluable detailed records of the activities of protestants during Mary's reign. Secondly they each came into the Acts and Monuments at a late date; the accounts of Rose and Kemp were introduced in the 1576 edition and the account of Sandys in the 1583 edition. Finally, and most importantly, all three accounts were written by their protagonists and sent to Foxe for purposes of self-justification and self-exculpation. Rose was clearly anxious to explain away the recantations which saved his life and Sandys was concerned to demonstrate that he had been released from prison without ever recanting. Kemp's motives for his account were even more interesting. One of the leaders of the freewillers, merely mentioned by Foxe, was named John Kemp. (Foxe's casual references to the freewiller, both deleted in the 1570 edition, are 1563, pp. 1530 and 1605). The John Kemp who wrote a detailed account of his activities in Mary's reign, which only appeared in the 1576 edition (pp. 1975-77), wanted to demonstrate that he was not the freewiller of the same name. (See Thomas S.Freeman, 'Dissenters from a Dissenting Church: The Challenge of the Freewillers1550-1558' in The Beginnings of English Protestantism, ed. Peter Marshall andAlec Ryrie [Cambridge, 2002], p. 147). Kemp's account was deleted from the 1583 edition and, in many ways, it is a wonder that it was printed at all, since it mentioned the schisms among Marian protestants which Foxe was determined to cover up. One possible reason was that Kemp may have been a friend of Foxe's friend Alexander Wimshurst (see Freeman, 'Dissenters,' p. 147 n. 99).

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MarginaliaThe story of Thomas Rose yet liuing.THis Thomas Rose a Deuonshyre man, was borne in Exmouth, and being made Priest in that coūtrey, was brought out of it by one M. Fabiā, to Polsted in Suffolke where þe sayd M. Fabian was parson, & in short tyme after, by his meanes was placed in þe town of Hadley, wher he first cōming to some knowledg of the gospel, began first there to intreat vpon the Crede, & therupon to take occasiō to inueigh against Purgatory, praying to Saints & Images, about the tyme þt M. Latimer began first to preach at Cambridge, in the tyme of Bilney & Arthur. 47. yeares ago, or thereabout,  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 581, line 23

It is to be observed, that this account of Thomas Rose was first published by Foxe in the Edition of 1576: consequently, the expression "forty-seven years ago" carries us back to 1529, the date assigned by Foxe to the Card Sermons. That Latimer began to preach the Gospel earlier, appears from the notes {in Book XI}.

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in so much that many imbracing þe truth of Christes Gospell, against the sayd Purgatory and other poynts: and the number of them daily increasing, þe aduersaries beganne to stirre agaynst him, in so muche that M. Bale (who afterwarde became a godly zelous man) was

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then
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