Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Andrew Ingforby

Of unknown occupation. Of Ipswich.

Andrew Ingforby, his wife and daughter fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

[Father-in-law of Lawrence Humphrey. See ODNB.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Edmund Grindal

(1519? - 1583)

Marian exile. DD (1564). Bishop of London (1559 - 1570). Archbishop of York (1570 - 1576). Archbishop of Canterbury (1576 - 1583). [Fasti; DNB; Venn]

Edmund Grindal's exile was mentioned in Bradford's letter to the university town of Cambridge. 1563, pp. 1178-80, 1570, pp. 1808-09, 1576, p. 1545, 1583, p. 1627.

Grindal wrote to Ridley from his exile in Frankfort, to which letter Ridley replied. He mentioned his imprisonment with Cranmer, Latimer and Bradford. He mentioned that he knew that Ferrar, Hooper, Rogers, Taylor of Hadleigh, Saunders and Tomkins, a weaver, had all been martyred, as had Cardmaker the day before he wrote this letter. He had heard that West had relented, and Grimald cast into the Marshalsea. He had also heard that Thomas Ridley, of the Bull-head in Cheapside, had died. In addition, he had heard that his brother-in-law, Shipside, had spent much time in prison but was now released. 1570, pp. 1901-02, 1576, pp. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1729-30.

[Back to Top]

Edmund Grindal was a pall bearer at Bucer's funeral. 1563, p. 1559., 1570, p. 2153, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1968.

Edmund Grindal, with Matthew Parker, bore Martin Bucer's body on his shoulders. 1563, p. 1554 [recte 1562]

Matthew Parker, Edmund Grindal and Richard Goodrick requested that the body of Peter Martyr's wife be buried honourably. 1563, p. 1559., 1570, p. 2153, 1576, p. 1859, 1583, p. 1968.

Edmund Grindal was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

Foxe refers to his installation as bishop of London after Elizabeth's accession. 1583, p. 2128.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Edward Isaac

Edwardian JP. Marian religious exile [Garratt]. He was sheriff of Kent in 1568 - 1569.

Bland went to see Master Isaac about John Austen's behaviour in the parish church at Adisham. Isaac later directed a warrant to the constable. 1563, p. 1218, 1570, p. 1843, 1576, p. 1578, 1583, p. 1665.

Isaac fled Kent for fear of persecution during Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1679.

During his escape, Edwin Sandys met with Master Isaac of Kent, who sent his eldest son with Sandys. 1583, p. 2088.

Sandys remained in Strasbourg, sustained by Master Isaac, who gave him many gifts and 100 marks, which Sandys was later able to return to him.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
James Bocking

Shoemaker. Of Ipswich.

James Bocking fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
James Hearst

Of unknown occupation. Of Ipswich.

James Hearst's wife fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Joan Ingforby

Daughter of Andrew Ingforby. Married Lawrence Humphrey in Geneva. (ODNB sub Lawrence Humphrey)

Joan Ingforby fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Carlton

Saddler. Of Ipswich.

John Carlton fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Deersley

Servant to Stephen Green, shoemaker. Of Ipswich.

John Deersley fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Raw

Once servant to James Ashley. Of Ipswich.

John Raw fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Steward

John Steward, of Ipswich, was a persecutor of protestants. 1570, p. 2124, 1576, p. 1846, 1583, p. 1940.

A complaint was made by Williams, Steward and Butler about protestants in Ipswich on 18 May 1556. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler accused 22 parishioners in Ipswich of not taking the sacrament. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

A complaint was made against several parishioners in Ipswich by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2090.

[Alias Footman]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Whoodles

Coverlet weaver. Of Ipswich.

John Whoodles fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Laurence Waterward

Curate. Born in Chorley, Lancashire but residing in Ipswich.

Laurence Waterward fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Martin Algate

Martin Algate. Of Ipswich

Martin Algate's wife fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Matthew Bird

Of unknown occupation. Of Ipswich.

Matthew Bird fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

[Not related to the Birds of Dedham or Norwich.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Matthew Butler

Apothecary. Constable of Ipswich.

Matthew Butler was a persecutor of protestants. 1570, p. 2124, 1576, p. 1846, 1583, p. 1940.

He is also described as a curious singing man and a fine organist. 1570, p. 2124, 1576, p. 1846, 1583, p. 1940.

One night when he was on watch at Cornhill, Argentine came to him with news of Agnes Wardall's return to Ipswich. 1570, p. 2124, 1576, p. 1846, 1583, p. 1940.

Butler and Argentine conspired against Agnes Wardall. 1570, p. 2124, 1576, p. 1846, 1583, p. 1940.

A complaint was made by Williams, Steward and Butler about protestants in Ipswich on 18 May 1556. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler accused 22 parishioners in Ipswich of not taking the sacrament. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

A complaint was made against several parishioners in Ipswich by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2090.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Mother Fenkel

Midwife. Of Ipswich.

Mother Fenkel refused to have children dipped in the fonts. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

She was said by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler not to have watched the elevation of the sacrament. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Mrs Algate

Wife of Martin Algate. Of Ipswich.

Martin Algate's wife fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Mrs Bird

Wife of Matthew Bird. Of Ipswich.

Matthew Bird's wife fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

[Not related to the Birds of Dedham or Norwich.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Mrs Coleman

Wife of Robert Coleman. Of Ipswich.

Robert Coleman's wife fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Mrs Greenwich

Wife of Stephen Greenwich. Of Ipswich, Suffolk.

The wife of Stephen Greenwich fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Mrs Hearst

Wife of James Hearst. Of Ipswich.

James Hearst's wife fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Mrs Ingforby

Wife of Andrew Ingforby. Of Ipswich.

Andrew Ingforby's wife fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

[Mother-in-law of Lawrence Humphrey. See ODNB.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Mrs Richman

Daughter of Mother Fenkel. Wife of Richard Richman. Of Ipswich.

The wife of Richard Richman fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Mrs Swaine

Widow. Of Ipswich.

Mrs Swaine fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Mrs Whoodles

Wife of John Whoodles. Of Ipswich.

The wife of John Whoodles fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Mrs Wright

Wife of William Wright.. Of 'the windmill', Ipswich.

The wife of William Wright fled Ipswich for fear of persecution.1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Peter Martyr Vermigli

(1500 - 1562) [DNB; Hillerbrand, Oxford Encyclopedia of the Reformation]

About 5 September 1553 Peter Martyr arrived in London from Oxford (where he had been held under arrest) and met with Cranmer to discuss their participating in a disputation to defend the Book of Common Prayer at Oxford. But Cranmer was arrested and Martyr deported (1563, p. 905; 1570, p. 1571; 1576, p. 1339; 1583, p. 1497 [recte 1409]).

[Back to Top]

Peter Martyr was permitted to leave the realm and returned to Strasburg (1570, p. 1579; 1576, p. 1347; 1583, p. 1418).

On 14 February 1555 at 3 o'clock Dr Harding went to see John Bradford in prison and talked of his fear for Bradford's soul after excommunication, and said that he himself had spoken against Peter Martir, Martin Bucer, Luther and others for their beliefs. 1563, p. 1200, 1570, pp. 1790-91, 1576, p. 1529, 1583, pp. 1612-13 .

[Back to Top]

Foxe states that he omitted the talk Bradford and Pendleton had of 'my lord of Canterbury, of Peter Martirs boke, of Pendleto[n]s letter laid to Bradford', a discussion held on 28 March 1555. 1563, p. 1214, 1570, p. 1804, 1576, p. 1540, 1583, p. 1623.

Ridley was converted through reading Bertram's book of the sacrament, and confirmed in his beliefs through conference with Cranmer and Peter Martyr. 1570, p. 1895 1576, p. 1623, 1583, p. 1717.

Bartlet Green was converted through attending Peter Martyr's lectures at Oxford. 1563, p. 1458, 1570, p. 2021, 1576, p. 1742, 1583, p. 1850.

Peter Martyr wrote a book against Gardiner's Marcus Anthonius Constantius. 1570, p. 2045, 1576, p. 1764, 1583, p. 1870.

Julins Palmer borrowed Peter Martyr's Commentaries on I Corinthians, which helped to convert him. 1570, p. 2118, 1576, p. 1841 [recte 1829], 1583, p. 1935.

Foxe states that those who were blinded with ignorance or malice thought Peter Martyr not a learned man. 1563, p. 1474 [recte 1472].

[Also referred to as 'Peter Martyr']

Nicholas Carre wrote a letter to John Cheke about Martin Bucer, which was then passed on to Peter Martyr. 1563, p. 1540, 1570, p. 2145, 1576, p. 1865, 1583, p. 1957.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Philip Williams [or Ulmes]

(fl. 1519 - 1558)

Wealthy merchant of Ipswich. Chamerlain of Ipswich (1550 - 1551). Treasurerr of Ipswich (1557 - 1558). MP for Ipswich 1558. (Bindoff).

Philip Ulmes of Ipswich was a persecutor of protestants. 1570, p. 2124, 1576, p. 1846, 1583, p. 1940.

A complaint was made by Williams, Steward and Butler about protestants in Ipswich on 18 May 1556. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler accused 22 parishioners in Ipswich of not taking the sacrament. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

A complaint was made against several parishioners in Ipswich by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2090.

[Alias Footman]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richard Cox

(1500 - 1581)

Chaplain to Henry VIII, Archbishop Cranmer and Bishop Goodricke. Bishop of Ely (1559-1581). Exile during Mary's reign.[DNB]

Richard Cox was committed to the Marshalsea. 1570, p. 1634; 1576, p. 1394; and 1583, p. 1465.

A commission was sent to Kent to find out the truth about Cranmer's beliefs and the charges of heresy against him. The commission members were Dr Belhouse, Chauncellor Cox and Hussey the registrar. 1570, p. 2042, 1576, p. 1761, 1583, p. 1867.

During Careless' first examination, Martin claimed that Cox had refuted some of Careless' arguments. 1563, pp. 1529-35, 1570, pp. 2101-02.

Julins Palmer's first examination was by the mayor, with charges brought by Thomas Thackham (who had been in the teaching post that Palmer had taken). False witnesses against him were Cox, Cately and Downer. Foxe records the articles against him. 1570, pp. 2120-21, 1570, pp. 1842-43, 1583, pp. 1937-38.

[Back to Top]

Richard Cox was a participant in the Westminster disputation of 1559. 1563, p. 1717, 1583, p. 2119.

[Also referred to as 'D. Cockes']

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richard Hedley

Bookseller. Of Ipswich.

Richard Hedley was a seller of protestant books during Mary's reign. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

He fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richard Hover

Apprentice with Nicholas Nottingham. Of Ipswich.

Richard Hover fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richard Richman

Servant to Stephen Green, shoemaker. Of Ipswich.

Richard Richman and his wife fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Robert Coleman

Of unknown occupation. Of Ipswich.

Robert Coleman fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Robert Nottingham

Of unknown occupation. Of Suffolk.

Two of Robert Nottingham's servants were said by Philip Williams, John Steward and Matthew Butler not to have taken the sacrament. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

[Probably related to the other Ipswich Nottinghams]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Robert Partrich

Robert Partrich fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Roger Laurence

Of unknown occupation. Of Ipswich.

Roger Laurence fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

[Alias Sparrow.]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Rose Nottingham

Daughter of William Nottingham the elder. Of Suffolk.

Robert Samuel was kissed by Rose Sherringham (or Nottingham) on his way to the stake. 1563, p. 1270, 1570, p. 1898, 1576, p. 1609, 1583, p. 1703.

Rose Nottingham fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

[Probably related to the other Ipswich Nottinghams]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Stephen Greenwich

Of unknown occupation. Of Ipswich, Suffolk.

Stephen Greenwich fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Fowler

Shoemaker. Of Ipswich.

Fowler fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Thompson

Shoemaker. Of Ipswich.

Thomas Thompson was said to have received communion only twice in seventeen years. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

He fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Walter Wright

(d. 1561)

D. C. L. (1540) [Foster]. Archdeacon of Oxford (1543 - 1561).

Philpot spoke with Worcester, Wright and Chadsey later the same day as his twelfth examination. 1570, pp. 1993-94, 1576, pp. 1717, 1583, p. 1823-24.

Wright was one of the cardinal's visitors who had a commission to have the bones of Peter Martyr's wife dug up and burned. 1563, pp. 1558 [recte 1570]-1559 [recte 1571].

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Coleman

Servant to Stephen Greenwich. Of Ipswich.

William Coleman fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Coleman

Occupation unknown. Of Ipswich.

Coleman fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Harset

Bricklayer. Of Ipswich.

Harset fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Nottingham

The elder. Of unknown occupation. Of Suffolk.

William Nottingham's daughter fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

[Probably related to the other Ipswich Nottinghams]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Palmer

Servant to Stephen Green, Shoemaker. Of Ipswich.

William Palmer fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Pikes [or Pikers]

(d. 1558)

Tanner. Martyr. Of Ipswich.

In the third year of Mary's reign Pikes read Tyndale's translation of the Bible (corrected by Rogers) in his garden. Four drops of blood suddenly fell onto the book. He told his wife and they both saw it as a portent of things to come. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2241, 1576, p. 1936, 1583, p. 2042.

William Pickess fled Ipswich for fear of persecution. 1576, p. 1981, 1583, p. 2089.

Articles against him were ministered by Thomas Darbyshire on 22 June 1558. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2241, 1576, p. 1935, 1583, p. 2039.

He gave answers to the articles. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2241, 1576, p. 1935, 1583, p. 2039.

He appeared before Darbyshire on 11 July 1558. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2241, 1576, p. 1935, 1583, p. 2039.

Sentence was read by Darbyshire in the presence of Edward Hastings and Thomas Cornwallis. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2241, 1576, p. 1935, 1583, p. 2039.

Pikes was burned at Brentford on 14 July 1558. 1563, p. 1669, 1570, p. 2241, 1576, p. 1935, 1583, p. 2039.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Beccles
Beckles, Bechelles
NGR: TM 425 900

A market town and parish in the hundred of Wangford, county of Suffolk. 44 miles east-north-east from Bury St. Edmunds. The living is a rectory, with the vicarage of St. Mary Endgate annexed, in the Archdeaconry of Suffolk, diocese of Norwich

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

[Back to Top]
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Chorley
Chorley
NGR: SD 585 175

A market town and parish in the hundred of Leyland, county Palatine of Lancaster. 32 miles south by east from Lancaster. Chorley was originally a chapelry in the parish of Croston, from which it was separated in 1793. The living is a rectory not in charge, in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Chester

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

[Back to Top]
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Ipswich
Ipswich, Ipswiche
NGR: TM 170 440

A borough in the liberty of Ipswich, county of Suffolk. 25 miles south-east by east from Bury St. Edmunds, 69 miles north-east from London. The borough comprises the parishes of St. Clement, St. Helen, St. Lawrence, St. Margaret, St. Mary at Elms, St. Mary at the Quay, St. Mary Stoke, St. Mary at the Tower, St. Mathew, St. Nicholas, St. Peter, St. Stephen, Witham with Thurlstone, and part of Westerfield; all within the Archdeaconry of Suffolk and Diocese of Norwich. St. Clement with St. Helen is a rectory in charge; St. Mary Stoke is a rectory; St. Mathew and St. Stephen are discharged rectories; St. Lawrence, St. Margaret, St. Mary at Elms, St. Mary at Quay, St. Mary at the Tower, St. Nicholas and St. Peter are perpetual curacies

[Back to Top]

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

[Back to Top]
2113 [2089]

Queene Mary. Diuers saued by Gods prouidence from the fire, in Queene Maries dayes.

MarginaliaAnno 1558.them, he knew his handy worke, and sayd: These are not thy maisters hose, but Doct. Sandes, them I made in the Tower. The boy yelded and sayd, it was so. Sayth he, go to thy maistresse, pray her to sit vp till xij. of the clock, then I will bring the hose and speake with D. Sandes to his good.

[Back to Top]

At middenight, the goodwyfe of the house, and Beniamin the Taylor, commeth in to Doct. Sandes chamber. The wyfe praieth him not to be afraid of their commyng. He aunswereth, nothyng can be amisse, what God will, that shal be done. Then Beniamin telleth him þt he made his hose, and by what good chaunce they now came to hys handes, God vsed the meane that he might admonish him of his perill, and aduise hym how to escape it, tellyng him that all the Constables of London, whereof he was one, watched for hym, and some were so greedily set, that they prayed hym if he tooke hym, to let them haue the cariage of hym to the Bishop of Winchester, and he should haue the v. pound. Saith Beniamin, it is knowen that your man hath prouided two geldings, and that you mynde to ride out at Algate to morrow, and there then ye are sure to bee taken. Follow myne aduise, and by Gods grace ye shall escape their handes. Let your man walke all the day to morrow in the streete where your horses stand, booted and ready to ryde. The goodmans seruaunt of the house shall take the horses and carye them to Bednoll greene. The goodman shall bee booted, and follow after as if he would ride. I will be here with you to morrow about viij. of the clocke, it is both Terme and Parliament tyme, here wee will breake our Fast, and when the streete is full, we will go forth. Looke wildely, and if you meete your brother in the streete, shunne hym not, but outface hym and knowe hym not. Accordingly D. Sandes did, clothed lyke a gentleman in all respectes, and looked wildly as one that had bene long kept in prison out of the light. Beniamin caried hym through Birching lane, and from one lane to another, till he come at Moore gate. There they went foorth vntil they came to Bednoll greene where the horses were redy, and M. Hurleston, to ride with hym as his man.

[Back to Top]

D. Sandes pulled on his bootes, and takyng leaue of hys friend Beniamin, with teares they kissed eche other, hee put hys hand in his purse, and would haue geuen Beniamin a great part of that litle he had, but Beniamin would take none. Yet since, D. Sandes hath remembered hym thankfully. He rode that night to hys father in lawe, M. Sandes where his wyfe was, he had not bene there two howers, but it was told M. Sandes that there was two of the Garde which would that night apprehend Doctor Sandes, and so they were appoynted.

[Back to Top]

That night Doct. Sandes was guided to an honest Farmer neere the Sea, where hee taried two dayes and two nights in a chamber without all company. After that hee shifted to one Iames Mower a Shipmaister, who dwelt at Milton shore, where hee expected wynde for the English Fleete redy into Flaunders. While he was there Iames Mower brought to hym fortie or fiftie Mariners, to whom he gaue an exhortation, they liked him so well,

[Back to Top]

that they promised to die for it, or that he should be apprehended.

The 6. of May beyng Sonday, the wynd serued. Hee tooke his leaue of his Hoste and Hostesse, & went towards the ship, in taking leaue of his Hostesse who was barren, and had bene maried viij. yeares. Hee gaue her a fine handkerchiefe and an old royall of gold in it, thanking her much, and sayd: Be of good comfort, or that an whole yere be past, God shall geue you a childe, a boy. And it came to passe, for that day tweluemoneth lacking one day, God gaue her a faire sonne.

[Back to Top]

At the shore D. Sandes met with M. Isaac of Kent who had his eldest sonne there, who vpon the likyng hee had to D. Sandes, sent his sonne with hym, who afterward died in his fathers house in Franckford. D. Sands and D. Coxe, were both in one ship, beyng one Cockrels ship. They were within the kennyng,  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 597, line 4 from the bottom

"William Worcester uses the term kenning to denote a distance at sea, pp. 179, 313; and it appears from Leland that twenty miles was accounted as a kenning, probably, as the extreme distance within ordinary sight: 'Scylley is a Kennyng, that is to say, about a xx miles from the very Westeste pointe of Cornewaulle.' (Itin. iii. fol. 6.)" Mr. Way's note on Prompt. Parvulorum (p. 271), where it is Latinized by Cognicio. See also Boucher's Glossary under Barbicon; and Hall's Chronicle, p. 52, Edit. 1809.

[Back to Top]
when two of the Gard came thether to apprehend D. Sands. The ariued at Andwerpe, beyng bid to dinner to M. Locke. And at dinner tyme one George Gilpin beyng Secretary to the English house, and kinsman to D. Sandes, came to hym and rounded hym in his eare, and sayde: King Phillip hath sent to make search for you, and to apprehende you. Hereuppon they rose from their dinner in a meruailous great shower, and went out at the gate toward the lande of Cleue. They they founde a Wagon and hasted away, and came safe to Ausburg  
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 598, line 4

"Ausburg" is the reading in Foxe's very inaccurate text of 1583, where this account first appears: but it is most probable that we should here read "Duisburg" or "Duysburg," which was in Cleveland. This suggestion seems quite confirmed by the exactly parallel case of Thomas Mountain: "So with as much speed as I could make, I took waggon, and went up to Germany, and there was at a place called Duisburgh, a free city, being under the Duke of Cleveland." (Wordsworth's Eccles. Biogr. iii. 305, Edit. 1839; or Strype's Memorials, Mary, ch. 24.)

[Back to Top]
in Cleueland where D. Sands taried 14. dayes, and then iorneyed towardes Strausborough, where after he had lyued one yeare, his wyfe came vnto hym. He fell sore sicke of a flixe, which kept hym nine monthes, and brought him to deathes dore. He had a child which fell sicke of the plage and died. His wyfe at length fell sicke of a consumption and dyed in his armes, no man had a more godly woman to his wyfe.

[Back to Top]

After this, M. Sampson went away to Emanuel, a man skilfull in the Hebrue. M. Grindall went into the countrey to learne the Dutch tongue. D. Sandes still remayned in Strausborough, whose sustentation then was chiefly from one M. Isaac, who loued him most dearely, and was euer more redy to geue, then he to take. He gaue hym in þt space aboue one hundreth marks, which summe the sayd D. Sandes payd him agayne, and by hys other gifts and friendlines, shewed hymselfe to bee a thankfull man. When his wyfe was dead hee went to Zurike, and there was in Peter Martyrs house for the space of fiue weekes. Beyng there, as they sate at dinner, word sodenly came that Queene Mary was dead, and Doct. Sands was sent for by his friendes at Strausborough. That newes made M. Martyr, and M. Iaret then there, verye ioyfull, but D. Sands could not reioyce, it smote into his hart that he should be called to misery.

[Back to Top]

M. Bullinger and the Ministers feasted him, and hee tooke his leaue and returned to Strausborough where he preached, and so M. Grindall and he came towards England, and came to London the same day that Queene Elizabeth was crowned.

A Complaint against such as fauoured the Gospell in Ipswich, exhibited to Queene Maries Counsaile, sittyng in Commission at Beckles in Suffolke, the 18. of May. Ann. 1556. by Phillip Williams, aliâs Footeman, Iohn Steward, and Mathew Butler, sworne for the purpose. 
Commentary  *  Close
Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers

This document was introduced in the 1576 edition. Notice the predominance of St Christopher's parish in this list. And notice the frequency with which members and servants of certain families - particularly the Nottinghams - appear on this list.

¶ The names of such as fled out of theTowne, and lurked in secret places.

MarginaliaS. Mary Tower.Robert Partriche.
Rose Nottingham, daughter of William Nottingham
the elder. 

Commentary  *  Close

Rose Nottingham had earlier got into trouble for her public support of the Marian martyr Robert Samuel (1570, p. 1879; 1576, p. 1609 and 1583, p. 1704).

MarginaliaS. Laurence.Anne Fenne, seruaunt to Robert Nottingham.
Andrewe Yngforbye his wife and daughter. 

Commentary  *  Close

Andrew Ingforby and his family fled to Geneva, where his daughter Joan married Laurence Humphrey, one of Foxe's closest friends (see the article on Humphrey in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography).

 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 598, line 11 from the bottom

The Latin Edition of the "Acts" supplies a notice of a portion of this family, under the head of remarkable "deliverances," which does not appear to have been repeated in the English editions:-
"Possem præterea commemorare, quibus Papistarum inter se discors sententia liberationem in magno periculo attulerit. Quod duabus piis matronis Ipsvichianis Ingforbii mercatoris uxori, et Martini, accidisse videtur. Quæ cum officii ac pietatis gratia Robertum Samuelem, de quo jam dictum est, in carcere Ipsvichiano captivum invisissent, domum forte reversæ noctu in duos incidebant custodes Papistas; qui etsi inscii non essent occulti ipsarum itineris, tamen cum judiciis inter se et sententiis vix satis inter se congruerent, quid ipsis esset faciendum - alter enim retinendas illas atque examinandas censuit: alter vero non item existimabat - illis in hunc modum varia fluctuantibus discordia, ipsæ interim e manibus elapsæ custodum suam utraque domum incolumis reversa est. Quæ quum non multo post iterum conquisitæ ad doctrinæ suæ disquisitionem petebantur, in ædibus Ingforbianis sese per superiora tecti cubicula occultantes, gravi evitato discrimine (ut duobus verbis totum rei exitum perstringam) xxx" (Rerum in Ecclesia gestarum Commentarii, auct. J. Foxo, p. 636. Basil. 1559.)

[Back to Top]

Thomas Thompson shomaker, supposed to haue re-
ceiued but twise these 17. yeares.
Marten Algate, lockesmith his wife.

MarginaliaS. Margarets.William Pickesse, Tanner.
Iohn Whoodles, Couerlet weauer, and his wife.
William Harset, Bricklaier.
Thomas Fowler, Shomaker.
W. Wright his wife at the Wind mill.
Laurence Waterwarde late Curate, borne in a towne
called Chorley, in Lankeshire,

MarginaliaS. Nicholas.Widowe Swaine.
Mathew Birde and his wife.
Stephen Greenwich and his wife.
Wil. Colman, seruant to the sayde Stephen.
Robert Colman and his wife.
Roger Laurence, aliâs Sparow.
Iohn Carelton, Sadler.
William Colman.
Iames Hearst his wife.

MarginaliaS. Peters.Richard Houer apprentise with Nicholas Notting-
ham.
Rich. Hedley a seller of hereticall bookes.

MarginaliaS. Stephens.Iames Bockyng Shoomaker, his wyfe.
Iohn Rawe, late seruant to Iames Ashley.

William Palmer.Rich. Richman.Iohn Deersley. 
seruants to Steuen Grene Sho-
maker.

Rich. Richman Shoomaker his wife, daughter to mo-
ther Fenkell Midwyfe.

Maistres
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield