Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageNone
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Alexander Campbel

Transferred from Cupar to St Andrews. Prior of the Dominicans (or Black Friars) at St Andrews. (See John Knox's History of the Reformation in Scotland, ed. W. Croft Dickinson, vol.1, p. 14.)

Alexander was the accuser of Patrick Hamilton who met with a terrible death a few days after the death of Hamilton. [Died in Glasgow.] 1570, p. 2303, 1576, p. 1994, 1583, p. 2103.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Denise Benfield

(b. 1551?)

Of Walmthamstow, Suffolk.

Denise Benfield was taught to read by the wife of William Maldon. Benfield was said to speak blasphemy to the other children learning to read with her. 1570, p. 2302, 1576, p. 1993, 1583, p. 2102.

William Maldon told his wife to correct Denise Benfield for her blasphemy but, on the day, the girl's mother made her go to market in London instead. She was stricken down with an illness that made her side go back and caused her to become speechless. She died shortly afterwards. Witnesses to this story were William Mauldon and his wife, as well as the girl's mother and father. 1570, p. 2302, 1576, p. 1993, 1583, p. 2102.

[Back to Top]
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
George Eagles

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Tailor. Itinerant preacher. From the Colchester area.

When charged with reading to the people in the woods, John Allerton said that he had not, save once, when he was in the company of George Eagles and Richard Roth, when Roth desired him to read something he had upon him. 1570, p. 2212, 1576, p. 1909, 1583, p. 2016.

Eagles preached during Edward VI's reign and then became itinerant during Mary's reign, which coined him the nickname of 'Trudgeover'. 1563, p. 1614, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2009.

John Johnson testified that he learned his heretical beliefs - denial of the eucharist and the power of a priest to absolve sin - from 'Trudgon'. He said that 'Trudgon' was a true prophet. 1563, p. 1614, 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1900, 1583, p. 2009.

Eagles preached in and around Colchester during Mary's reign. 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1901, 1583, p. 2009.

Spies were sent out to track down Eagles and bring him to the authorities either dead or alive. 1570, p. 2202, 1576, p. 1901, 1583, p. 2009.

Eagles' brethren hid him on several occasions, evading the authorities. 1570, p. 2203, 1576, p. 1901, 1583, p. 2009.

An edict was declared across Essex, Suffolk, Kent and Norwich, promising £20 to anyone who captured Eagles. 1570, p. 2203, 1576, p. 1901, 1583, p. 2009.

Eagles was captured in Colchester on Mary Magdalen's day 1557. 1570, p. 2203, 1576, p. 1901, 1583, p. 2009.

Eagles was committed to prison in Colchester and then, four days later, was conveyed to Chelmsford where, during his first night, he refused food and drink and kept continual prayer. 1570, p. 2203, 1576, p. 1901, 1583, p. 2009.

Eagles was indicted. 1570, p. 2203, 1576, p. 1901, 1583, p. 2009.

After his indictment, Eagles was taken to the new inn, called the Crown, in Chelmsford, by William Swallow. 1570, p. 2203, 1576, p. 1901, 1583, p. 2009.

Richard Potto, the innkeeper of the Cock Inn, tried to persuade George Eagles to ask the queen's forgiveness. 1570, p. 2203, 1576, p. 1901, 1583, p. 2009.

Eagles was drawn on a sledge to his execution. He carried with him a psalm book, from which he read aloud on the journey. 1570, p. 2203, 1576, p. 1901, 1583, p. 2010.

When Eagles was on the ladder, Potto again troubled him, begging him to ask forgiveness, but the sheriff pushed him away. 1563, 1615, 1570, p. 2003, 1576, p. 1901, 1583, p. 2010.

Eagles was executed with two thieves, one of whom asked Christ for mercy, the other rebuking such actions. These two men were hanged before Eagles suffered, the repentant man saying his prayers and passing quietly, the scoffer being unable to speak or pray prior to his death. 1563, 1615, 1570, p. 2003, 1576, p. 1901, 1583, p. 2010.

[Back to Top]

Eagles was hanged for a time but then cut down before he was dead. 1563, 1615, 1570, p. 2003, 1576, p. 1901, 1583, p. 2010.

William Swallow, a bailiff of Chelmsford, then put Eagles on the sled, laid his neck across it, and proceeded to hack at Eagles with a blunt cleaver, hitting him many times on the shoulders, chin, mangling him, and then cut out his heart. Eagles' body was then quartered, his bowels burned, and the body parts put on fish-stalls before Swallow's door, until horses were ready to take the quarters away - one each to Colchester, Harwich, Chelmsford, and St Osyth's. His head was placed on a pole in Chelmsford market until the wind blew it down, and eventually somebody buried it in the churchyard at night. 1563, p. 1615, 1570, p. 2204, 1576, p. 1902, 1583, p. 2010.

[Back to Top]
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
George Revet

Constable of Mendlesham.

Adam Foster was taken from his house by the constable George Revet and Thomas Mouse, at the commandement of Sir John Tyrrel, because he would not go to church. Afterwards, both constables were stricken with sickness. Revet, although a great reader of scripture, allowed his son to help the priest say mass and subsequently suffered swelling in his legs and died miserably. 1563, p. 1529, 1570, p. 1098, 1576, p. 1810, 1583, p. 1917.

[Back to Top]

George Revet was stricken with illness late in Mary's or early in Elizabeth's reign and died. 1570, p. 2302, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Harvey

A letter was sent by Ridley to West, in which Ridley asked West and also Dr Harvey to remember their promises to him. Foxe reproduces West's letter and Ridley's response. 1563, pp. 1379-81, 1570, pp. 1900-01, 1576, pp. 1627-28, 1583, pp. 1728-29.

[Possibly William Harvey (d. 1567) or Henry Harvey, LLD (1542), (d. 1585). Venn]

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Hugh Latimer

(1485 - 1555)

Bishop of Worcester (1535 - 1539). Martyr. Of Thirkeson, Leicester. [DNB]

Foxe relates Latimer's formative years. 1563, p. 1297, 1570, pp. 1903-04, 1576, p. 1630, 1583, p. 1730.

Hugh Latimer, the martyr, was the son of Hugh Latimer of Thirkeson, Leicestershire. 1563, p. 1297, 1570, p. 1903, 1576, p. 1630, 1583, p. 1730.

Latimer declaimed the work of Melancthon. 1563, p. 1297, 1570, p. 1903, 1576, p. 1630, 1583, p. 1734.

Foxe records a sermon Latimer preached at Cambridge in 1529. 1563, pp. 1298-1304, 1583, pp. 1731-35.

Foxe records another of Latimer's sermons, the subject of which was Turks. 1563, pp. 1304-07, 1583, pp. 1735-36.

Foxe records Latimer's sermon on how to play with certain cards. 1563, pp. 1298-1304, 1583, pp. 1731-34.

Buckenham, prior of the Black friars or Lady friars, attempted to show Latimer why scripture should not be in English by use of his cards. 1570, pp. 1903-04, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1734.

Dr Venetus, a Grey friar, berated Latimer in his sermons. 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1734.

Latimer's adversaries are listed: bishop of Ely (preached against him in King's College), Dr Watson (Master of Christ's College), Dr Norton (Master of Clare), Dr Philo (Master of Michael House), Dr Metcalfe (Master of St John), Dr Blith (of the King's Hall), Dr Bullock (Master of Queen's College), Dr Palmes (Master of St. Nicholas hostel), Bayne, Rud and Greenwood of St John's, Brikenden of St John's also, and said to have been a scholar of Latimer's. 1563, p. 1307, 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

[Back to Top]

Henry VIII appointed Richard Stokesley (Bishop of London), Stephen Gardiner (Bishop of Winchester), Richard Sampson (Bishop of Chichester), William Repps (Bishop of Norwich), Thomas Goodrich (Bishop of Ely), Hugh Latimer (Bishop of Worcester), Nicholas Shaxton (Bishop of Salisbury) and William Barlow (Bishop of St David's) to compose a book of ecclesiastical institutions called the Bishops' Book. 1563, p. 1472.

[Back to Top]

Dr West preached against Latimer at Barwell Abbey. 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

Barnes, prior of the Augustine friars, licensed Latimer to preach to the friars. 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

Articles were gathered out of Barnes' sermon against Master Tyrell, fellow of King's Hall, 1570, p. 1904, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

Latimer would walk and talk on 'Heretykes hyll' with Bilney. 1563, pp. 1307-08, 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1631, 1583, p. 1735.

Latimer went with Bilney to visit prisoners in the Tower in Cambridge. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1735.

Latimer and Bilney spoke to a woman in prison who was accused of killing her own child. Latimer spoke to Henry VIII after a sermon he gave at Windsor and tried to get the woman pardoned. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1735.

The woman gave birth to another child and Latimer became godfather, Mistress Cheek godmother. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1735.

Latimer and Bilney gave the woman spiritual counselling and eventually she was pardoned. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1735.

Dr Redman was an enemy of Latimer at Cambridge. 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, pp. 1735-36.

Foxe includes a copy in English and in Latin of a letter Latimer received from Dr Redman, who revoked him for the doctrine he taught, along with Latimer's brief response. 1563, p. 1308, 1570, pp. 1905-06, 1576, p. 1632 [English only], 1583, p. 1736.

Latimer subscribed to articles after three years' teaching and preaching at Cambridge. 1563, p. 1309, 1570, p. 1905, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1737.

Dr Buttes, the king's physician, housed Latimer while he was preaching in London. 1563, p. 1309, 1570, pp. 1905-06, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1738.

Latimer had been offered the benefice of West Kinton, Wiltshire, through the suit of Dr Buttes and Lord Cromwell. 1563, p. 1309, 1570, pp. 1905-06, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1738.

Latimer had been made bishop of Worcester, assisted by Cromwell and Buttes. 1570, p. 1907, 1576, p. 1632, 1583, p. 1738.

Latimer refuted Dr Powell's articles. 1563, pp. 1309-11, 1570, p. 1906, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1738.

Enemies of Latimer were Powell of Salisbury, Wilson of Cambridge, Hubberdin and Sherwood. 1563, p. 1311, 1570, p. 1906, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1738.

Latimer was called to appear before William Wareham (archbishop of Canterbury) and John Stokesley (bishop of London) on 29 January 1531. 1570, p. 1906, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1738.

The wording in Tonstall's register seems to suggest that Latimer did subscribe. 1563, p. 1334, 1570, p.1907 , 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1739.

Latimer was advanced to the post of bishop by Buttes and Cromwell. 1563, p. 1349, 1570, p. 1907, 1576, p. 1633., 1583, p. 1739.

Latimer told Morrice that the mayor had appointed him to preach at Easter. 1563, p. 1314, 1570, p. 1910, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1739.

Latimer prayed for Dr Wilson and his countrymen who disliked Latimer. 1563, p. 1317, 1570, p. 1912, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1739.

A friend of Latimer's told him that Wilson had gone to Beverley in Holdernesse and then on progress. 1563, p. 1317, 1570, p. 1912, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1739.

Latimer resigned his bishopric at the same time as Bishop Shaxton of Salisbury. 1563, p. 1353, 1570, p. 1907, 1576, p. 1634, 1583, p. 1740.

Articles were brought against Latimer. 1570, pp. 1926-28, 1576, pp. 1652-53, 1583, p. 1732.

Latimer was injured by a falling tree. He went to London for a remedy but was imprisoned in the Tower by the bishops in Edward's reign. 1563, p. 1353, 1570, p. 1908, 1576, p. 1635, 1583, p. 1738.

A justice in the diocese of Worcester bought land for his brother or for himself and and tried to have a poor man in the diocese damned. This man appealed to Latimer, who wrote to the gentleman about this. The gentleman later mended his ways and died prior to 1563. 1563, p .1353, 1570, p. 1908, 1576, pp. 1634-35, 1583, p. 1739.

[Back to Top]

Latimer preached in Stamford before the duchess of Suffolk in London in convocation and in the garden before King Edward at court. 1563, p. 1353, 1570, p. 1908, 1576, p. 1635, 1583, p. 1739.

He prophecied that plagues would come in Queen Mary's reign. 1563, p. 1354, 1570, p. 1909, 1576, p. 1635, 1583, p. 1740.

He believed that preaching the gospel would cost him his life and that was why Winchester was imprisoned. 1563, p. 1354, 1570, p. 1909, 1576, p. 1635, 1583, p. 1740.

Articles were imputed to Latimer by Powell of Salisbury. 1563, p. 1654, 1570, p. 1906, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1739.

Hubberdin railed against Latimer and also railed against Luther, Melancthon, Zwingli, Frith, and Tyndale. Hubberdin danced in the pulpit. 1570, p. 1912, 1576, p. 1639, 1583, p. 1748.

On 4 September 1553, the privy council ordered Latimer to appear before them (1583, p. 1497 [recte 1409]; APC IV, p. 340).

On 13 September, Latimer appeared before the privy council and was committed to the Tower as a 'close prisoner' (1583, p. 1497 [recte 1704] - 1410]; APC IV, p. 345-46). [NB: Foxe did not reprint the description in the privy council register of Latimer's 'sedycious demeanour'].

Latimer was committed to the Tower on 17 September 1553 (1570, p. 1466; 1576, p. 1395; 1583, p. 1635). [Note that Foxe never corrected these inconsistent dates].

He was examined by Weston and the other members of the catholic delegation to the Oxford disputations on Saturday 14 April 1554 (1563, pp. 933 and 938; 1570, pp. 1593; 1576, p. 1935 [recte 1359]; 1583, p. 1430).

[There is a summary of Latimer's disputation on Wednesday 18 April 1554 which was printed in its entirety only in 1563, p. 934-35.]

Latimer disputed with Weston, Smith and the other catholic doctors on 18 April 1554 (1563, pp. 978-85; 1570, pp. 1622-27; 1576, pp. 1384-89; 1583, pp. 1454-59).

Latimer was summoned, together with Cranmer and Ridley, before Weston and the commissioners on 20 April 1554. He refused to recant what he had said during the disputations. He was condemned and taken in custody by the bailiffs (1563, pp. 935-36; 1570, pp. 1632-33; 1576, pp. 1393; 1583, pp. 1463-67).

He was brought out of the bailiff's house where he was being held, on 21 April 1554, to observe a procession in which Weston carried the sacrament and four doctors carried a canopy over Weston. Latimer, however, thought he was about to be taken to execution and urged one Augustine Cooper to make a fire that would burn quickly. When he came to Carfax and understood that he was being taken to view the procession, Latimer refused to look at it and ran 'to one Spensers shop' (1563, p. 936; 1570, p. 1633; 1576, p. 1393; 1583, p. 1464).

[Back to Top]

Foxe mentions Latimer's condemnation and disputation in passing in 1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1399; 1583, p. 1469).

Bullinger sent commendations to Latimer, Thomas Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley in a letter to John Hooper dated 10 October 1554 (1570, p. 1692; 1576, p. 1444-45; 1583, p. 1518).

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Latimer, Thomas Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley from the Marshalsea(1570, pp. 1671-72; 1576, p. 1426; 1583, p. 1500).

The examination of Latimer and Ridley before White and Brookes took place on 30 September 1555. White and Brookes received their commission from Cardinal Poole. 1563, pp. 1297-98, 1570, pp. 1903-09, 1576, pp. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1757-60.

Latimer appeared at a second session with Brookes and White on 1 October 1555. 1570, pp. 1930-33, 1576, pp. 1758-59.

Ridley was cast into Bocardo prison with Hugh Latimer. 1563, p. 1285, 1583, p. 1718.

There was a conference between Ridley and Latimer in prison upon the objection of Antoman. 1563, pp. 1285-94, 1583, pp. 1718-24.

Grindal wrote to Ridley from his exile in Frankfort, to which letter Ridley replied. He mentioned his imprisonment with Cranmer, Latimer and Bradford. 1570, pp. 1901-02, 1576, pp. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1729-30.

Bullinger sent commendations to Latimer, Thomas Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley in a letter to John Hooper dated 10 October 1554. 1570, p. 1692; 1576, p. 1444-45; 1583, p. 1518.

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Latimer, Thomas Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley from the Marshalsea. 1570, pp. 1671-72; 1576, p. 1426; 1583, p. 1500.

John Bradford sent a letter to Cranmer, Latimer and Ridley. 1570, p. 1815 1576, p. 1551, 1583, p. 1634.

Rowland Taylor wrote a letter to Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley and Hugh Latimer when they were prisoners in Oxford. 1570, p. 2072; 1576, p. 1787; 1583, p. 1893.

Foxe relates the behaviour of Ridley and Latimer at their martyrdom. 1563, pp. 1376-79, 1570, pp. 1937-39, 1576, pp. 1661-62, 1583, p. 1769.

Foxe records Ridley's lamentation for a change in religion, in which Ridley makes reference to Latimer, Lever, Bradford and Knox, as well as Cranmer and their part in the duke of Somerset's cause. 1570, pp. 1945-50, 1576, pp. 1670-78, 1583, pp. 1778-84.

Cranmer was examined by Bonner and Ely and condemned on 12 September 1556 (seven days before the condemnation of Ridley and Latimer). 1563, pp. 1491-92, 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

Letters. 1563, pp. 1314-17, 1321-25, 1333-34, 1344-48, 1349-53, 1570, pp. , 1576, pp. , 1583, pp. 1736-37, 1741-42, 1745-56.

Hugh Latimer presented a new year's gift to Henry VIII. 1563, p. 1734.

Foxe includes one of Latimer's card sermons. 1583, p. 2142.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Levar

Ploughman. Of Brightwell, Suffolk.

Thomas Jenens of Abingdon said that he heard Levar say that Hugh Latimer had teeth like a horse when he saw Latimer being burned. 1570, p. 2303, 1576, p. 1994, 1583, p. 2104.

Around the same time as Levar uttered his words against Latimer, it was said that Levar's son hanged himself at Shipton, near Abingdon. 1570, p. 2303, 1576, p. 1994, 1583, p. 2104.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Mrs Fetty

Wife of John Fetty.

John Fetty's wife complained to Brokenbury about her husband's refusal to attend mass. 1563, p. 1693, 1570, p. 2257, 1576, p. 1948, 1583, p. 2055.

She went mad after her husband was taken by the authorities. 1563, p. 1693, 1570, p. 2257, 1576, p. 1948, 1583, p. 2055.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Mrs Swallow

Wife of William Swallow, bailiff of Chelmsford.

She married Swallow shortly after the death of George Eagles and was taken ill with the falling-sickness. 1570, p. 2204, 1576, p. 1902, 1583, p. 2010.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richard Denton

(d. 1564)

Smith. Of Wellney, Cambridgeshire.

While in prison, William Wolsey gave Thomas Hodilo six shillings and eight pence to give to Richard Denton. 1570, p. 1894, 1576, p. 1622,1583, p. 1715.

Denton gave Wolsey a book of scripture that ultimately brought Wolsey to the stake. 1570, p. 1894, 1576, p. 1622, 1583, p. 1715.

Denton was afraid to burn, so lived quietly during Mary's reign. 1570, p. 1894, 1576, p. 1622, 1583, p. 1715.

Richard Denton was burned in his own house with two others. 1570, p. 2303.

On 18 April 1564, Denton's house burned down. Denton and two others were killed in the fire. Denton had entered the burning building to try to save his goods. 1570, p. 1894, 1576, p. 1622, 1583, p. 1715.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richard Potto

(d. 1558)

Inn-keeper of the Cock Inn, Chelmsford.

Richard Potto tried to persuade George Eagles to ask the queen's forgiveness. 1570, p. 2203, 1576, p. 1901, 1583, p. 2009.

When Eagles was on the ladder, Potto again troubled him, begging him to ask forgiveness, but the sheriff pushed him away. 1563, 1615, 1570, p. 2003, 1576, p. 1901, 1583, p. 2010.

After the death of George Eagles, Potto fell into dispute with some of his neighbours and then fell ill early in Elizabeth's reign. He lay in his bed, foaming at the mouth, unable to speak or comprehend anything for three or four days, after which he died. 1563, 1615, 1570, p. 2003, 2303, 1576, p. 1901, 1583, p. 2010.

[Back to Top]
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Robert Edgore

Robert Edgore went mad because he executed his duties as a parish clerk against his conscience. He was held in chains and bonds for many years after. 1570, p. 2303, 1576, p. 1994, 1583, p. 2103.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Arundel

(1353 - 1414)

Chancellor. Archbishop of Canterbury (1396 - 1398; 1399 (restored) - 1414) [DNB]

Arundel's death is referred to in Foxe's account of Stephen Gardiner. 1563, p. 1383, 1570, p. 1952, 1576, p. 1679, 1583, p. 1786.

Thomas Arundel gave sentence against Cobham but died before him, from an illness that caused his tongue to swell so much that he could not swallow. 1570, p. 2303, 1576, p. 1994, 1583, p. 2103.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Jenens

Of Abingdon.

Thomas Jenens of Abingdon said that he heard Levar say that Hugh Latimer had teeth like a horse when he saw Latimer being burned. 1570, p. 2303, 1576, p. 1994, 1583, p. 2104.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Mouse

(d. 1558?)

Constable. Of Mendlesham.

Adam Foster was taken from his house by the constable George Revet and Thomas Mouse, at the commandment of Sir John Tyrrel because he would not go to church. Afterwards, both constables were stricken with fear and sickness. Mouse, although young and healthy, pined away. 1563, p. 1529, 1570, p. 1098, 1576, p. 1810, 1583, p. 1917.

[Back to Top]

Thomas Mouse died miserably sometime after the death of Mary. 1570, p. 2303, 1576, p. 1994, 1583, p. 2103.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Swallow

Bailiff of Chelmsford.

After his indictment, George Eagles was taken to the new inn, called the Crown, in Chelmsford, by William Swallow. 1570, p. 2203, 1576, p. 1901, 1583, p. 2009.

William Swallow, a bailiff of Chelmsford, took George Eagles to his place of execution on a sled, laid his neck across it, and proceeded to hack at Eagles with a blunt cleaver, hitting him many times on the shoulders, chin, mangling him, and then cut out his heart. Eagles' body was then quartered, his bowels burned, and the body parts put on fish-stalls before Swallow's door, until horses were ready to take the quarters away - one each to Colchester, Harwich, Chelmsford, and St Osyth's. His head was placed on a pole in Chelmsford market until the wind blew it down and eventually somebody buried in the churchyard at night. 1570, p. 2204, 1576, p. 1902, 1583, p. 2010.

[Back to Top]

Swallow became ill after the death of Eagles. His hair fell out, his eyes closed so that he could hardly see, and his finger- and toe-nails fell off. 1570, p. 2204, 1576, p. 1902, 1583, p. 2010.

Swallow married shortly after the death of Eagles. His wife was taken ill with the falling-sickness. 1570, p. 2204, 1576, p. 1902, 1583, p. 2010.

Note that in 1563, p. 1704, the death of Swallow is referred to but his name is not given in the text. He is only described here as the 'bewrayer of George Eagles'.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Abingdon
Abyngdon
NGR: SU 495 795

A borough, having separate and exclusive jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Harmer, county of Berkshire, of which it is the chief town. 6 miles south from Oxford, 26 miles north west by north from Reading. The town comprises the parishes of St. Helens and St. Nicholas, both in the Archdeaconry of Berkshire, Diocese of Salisbury. The living of St. Helens is a vicarage, with the sinecure rectory of St. Nicholas annexed.

[Back to Top]

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

[Back to Top]
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Brightwell
Bryhtwell
NGR: SU 578 908

A parish in the hundred of Moreton, county of Berkshire. 2.5 miles west-north-west from Wallingford. The living is a rectory in the Archdeaconry of Berkshire, diocese of Salisbury, and in the patronage of the Bishop of Winchester

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

[Back to Top]
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Hackney
Hackney
NGR: TQ 355 855

A parish in the Tower division of the hundred of Ossulstone, county of Middlesex. 2 miles north-east from London, comprising three districts. Until 1825 Hackney consisted of one parish. It was then divided into three, called Hackney, South Hackney and West Hackney. Each is a distinct rectory, in the jurisdiction of the Commissary of London, concurrently with the Consistorial Court of the Bishop of London

[Back to Top]

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

[Back to Top]
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Shepton
Shepton
NGR: SU 480 980

Unidentified, suggest:

Shippon

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

[Back to Top]
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Walthamstow
Walthamstow
NGR: TQ 370 880

A parish in the hundred of Becontree, county of Essex. 6 miles north-east by north from London. The living is a vicarage in the jurisdiction of the Commissary of London, concurrently with the Consistorial Court of the Bishop

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

[Back to Top]
2127 [2103]

Queene Mary. Gods punishment vpon persecutors, and contemners of the Gospell.

MarginaliaAnno 1558.thou Iohn?

He sayde, I was afraide.

Whereon wast thou afraide, said Mauldon?

Nothing now, sayd the other? and so he would not tel hym. After thys, when Mauldon and he went to bedde, Mauldon asked him whereof he was afraide?

He sayde, when you red Lord haue mercye vppon vs, Christ haue mercy uppon vs, me thought the haire of my head stoode upright, wt a great feare which came vpon me.

Then sayd Mauldon: Iohn thou mayest see, the euill spirite could not abide that Christ should haue mercy vppon vs: Wel Iohn (said Mauldon) repent and amend thy life, for God will not be mocked. If we mocke and iest at his woord, he will punish vs.

Also you vse rebauldry woordes and swearing verye much: therfore for Gods sake Iohn amend thy life. So I will (sayd he) by the grace of God: I pray God I may. Amen said the other, with other words, and so went to bed.

MarginaliaA terrible example of Gods iudgement to be noted of all such as be contemners and mockers of God and his worde.On the next day, about 8. of the clocke in the morning, the foresaid Iohn came running downe out of his chamber in his shirt into the Hall, and wrasteled with hys mistresse as he would haue throwen her downe. Wherat she shriked out, and her seruauntes holpe her, and tooke hym by strength, and caried him vp vnto his bed, & bound him downe to his bed (for they perceiued plainely that he was out of his right minde.)

[Back to Top]

After that, as he lay, almoste day and night his toung neuer ceased, but he cried out of the deuill of hell, and hys woordes were euer stil: O the deuill of hell: now the deuill of hell: I would see the deuill of hell: thou shalt see the deuil of hel: there he was, there he goeth, with other words, but most of the Deuill of hell.

[Back to Top]

Thus he lay without amendment about 6. daies, that his maister and all his houshold was weary of that trouble and noyse. Then his maister agreed with the keepers of Bedlem, and gaue a peece of money, and sent hym thether. It seemeth that he was possessed with an euill spirit, from the which God defend vs all.

[Back to Top]

This is a terrible example to you that be mockers of the word of God: therfore repent & amend, lest the vengeance of God fall vpon you in like maner. Witnes heereof William Mauldon of Newington.

MarginaliaGods punishment vpon a young damsell of 12 yeares olde, blaspheming the Maiesty of god.The same William Mauldon chaunced afterwarde to dwel at a Towne 6. miles from London called Waltamstow, where his wife taught yong children to read, which was about the yeare of our Lorde 1563. and the 4. yeare of Queene Elizabeths raigne. Vnto this schoole, amongest other children, came one Benfieldes daughter, named Dennis, about the age of twelue yeares.

[Back to Top]

As these children sate talking together, they happened among other talke (as the nature of children is, to be busy with many things) to fall in communication of God, and to reason among them selues, after their childish discretion, what he should be.

Whereunto some answered one thing, some an other. Among whom when one of the children had sayd, that he was a good olde father: the foresayd Denis Benfielde casting out impious woordes of horrible blasphemie: what he (sayd shee) is an olde doting foole.

What wretched and blasphemous wordes were these yee heare. Nowe marke what followed.

When William Mauldon heard of these abhominable woordes of the girle, hee willed his wife to correcte her for the same. Which was appoynted the nexte day to be done. But whē the next morow came, her mother would nedes send her to the market to London, the wenche greatly intreating her mother that she might not go, being marueilously vnwilling thereunto. Howebeit thorough her mothers compulsion, shee was forced to goe, and went. And what happened? Her businesse being done at London, as she was returning againe homewarde, and being a little past Hackney, MarginaliaBlasphemy punished.sodenly the yong girle was stricken, that all the one side of her was black, and she speachles. Wherupon immediately she was caried backe to Hackney, and there the same night was buried. Witnes of the same storie William Mauldon and his wife, also Benfielde her father, and her mother, which yet be all aliue.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaA lesson to children and young gyrles.A terrible example (no doubt) both to old and young, what it is for children to blaspheme the Lord theyr God, and what it is for parentes to suffer their young ones to grow vp in such blasphemous blindnes, & not to nurture them betime in the rudimēts of the christian Catechisme, to know first their creation, and then their redemption in Christ our Sauiour: to feare the name of God, and to reuerence his Maiestie. For els what do they deserue but to be taken away by deathe, whiche contemptuously despise him, of whome they take the benefite of life?

[Back to Top]

And therefore let all young maides, boyes, and yong

men, take example by this wretched seely wench, not only not to blaspheme the sacrede Maiestie of the omnipotent God their creator, but also not once to take his name in vaine, according as they are taughte in hys commaundementes.

MarginaliaA lesson to fathers and Godfathers and Godmothers. Secondly, let all Fathers, Godfathers, and Godmothers take this for a warning, to see to the instruction and Catechising of their children, for whom they haue bounde them selues in promise both to God and to hys Churche. Which if the Father, and godfather, the Mother and godmothers had done to this younge girle, verely it maye be thought this destruction had not fallen vpon her.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaA lesson to all Atheistes, Epicures, and Infidells.Thirdly, al blinde Atheists, Epicures, Mammonists, belly Gods of this worlde, and sonnes of Beliall, hypocrites, infidelles, and mockers of Religion, which saye in their hearts (there is no God) learne also hereby, not only what God is, and what he is able to doe, but also in thys miserable creature here punished in this world, to behold what shall likewise fall on them in the world to come, vnlesse they will be warned betime, by such examples as the Lord God doth geue them.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaA lesson to all blasphemers & swearers.Fourthly and lastly, heere may also be a spectacle for all them which be blasphemous and abhominable swearers, or rather tearers of God, abusing his glorious name in suche contemptuous and despitefull sort as they vse to do. Whome if neither the woorde and commaundemente of God, nor the calling of the preachers, nor remorse of conscience, nor rule of reason, nor theyr wytheringe age, nor hory haires will admonish: yet let these terrible examples of Gods districte Iudgement, somewhat mooue them to take heede to them selues. For if thys young maiden, who was not fully 12. yeares old, for her vnreuerent speaking of God (and that but at one time) did not escape the stroke of Gods terrible hande, what then haue they to looke for, which being men growen in yeares, and stricken in age, being so often warned & preached vnto, yet cease not continually with theyr blasphemous othes, not only to abuse his name, but also most cōtumeliously and despitefully to teare him (as it were) and all his partes in peeces?

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaLeuar of Abingdon, a blasphemer of Gods Martyrs, plagued.About the yeare of our Lorde 1565. at Bryhtwell in the County of Barkshyre, vppon certaine communication as touching the right reuerende Martyrs in Christ, Byshop Cranmer, Bishop Ridley, and maister Hughe Latimer, there came into an house in Abyngdon, one whose name is Leuar, being a Plowman, dwelling in Bryhtwel afore sayd, and sayd, that he saw that euill fauoured knaue Latimer when he was burned: And also in despite sayd, that he had teeth like a horse. At which time and hour, as neare as could be gathered, the sonne of the sayde Leauer moste wickedly hanged him selfe, at Shepton in the Countie aforesayd within a mile of Abingdon.

[Back to Top]

These wordes were spoken in the hearing
of me Thomas Ienens of Abyngdon.

MarginaliaThomas Arundell Archbishop of Canterbury.Did not Thomas Arundell, Archbishop of Canterburie geue sentence against the Lord Cobham, and died him selfe before him, being so stricken in his toung, that neither he could swallow nor speake for a certain space before his death? pag. 588.

MarginaliaFryer Champbell plagued.Frier Campbell, the accuser of Patricke Hamelton in Scotlande, what a terrible ende hee hadde, reade before, pag. 957.

MarginaliaGods iudgment vpon Haruy a persecuting Cōmissary.Haruey a Commissarie, that condemned a poore man in Calice, was shortly after hanged, drawen, and quartered, pag. 1229.

MarginaliaGods iust plague vpon William Swallow.William Swallow the curell tormentor of George Egles, was shortly after so plagued of God, that al the hair of his heade, and nailes of his fingers and toes went off, his eyes welneare closed vppe, that hee coulde scante see. Hys wife also was stricken wyth the falling Sickenesse, wyth the whych Maladie shee was neuer infected before. pag. 2010.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaGods iust plague vpō Richard Potto.Likewise Richard Potto, an other troubler of the sayd George Egles, vppon a certaine anger or chafe with hys seruauntes, was so sodenlye taken with sicknesse, that falling vpon his bed lyke a beast, there he died & neuer spake woorde, pag. 2010.

MarginaliaRichard Denton burned in his owne house.Richard Denton, a shrinker from the Gospel, while he refused to suffer the fire in the Lordes quarell, was afterward burned in his owne house with two mo, pag. 1717.

MarginaliaFettyes wyfe stricken with madnes.The wife of Iohn Fettye beinge the cause of the taking of her husband, how she was immediatly vppon the same by Gods hand stricken wyth madnesse, and was distracte out of her wittes, read before, pag. 2055.

Thomas Mowse and George Reuet, two persecutors were stricken miserably wyth the hand of God, and so died, pag. 1917.

Also Robert Edgore, for that hee hadde executed the office of a Parish Clearke against his conscience, thoroughe

anguish
Go To Modern Page No:  
Click on this link to switch between the Modern pagination for this edition and Foxe's original pagination when searching for a page number. Note that the pagination displayed in the transcription is the modern pagination with Foxe's original pagination in square brackets.
Find:
Type a keyword and then restrict it to a particular edition using the dropdown menu. You can search for single words or phrases. When searching for single words, the search engine automatically imposes a wildcard at the end of the keyword in order to retrieve both whole and part words. For example, a search for "queen" will retrieve "queen", "queene" and "queenes" etc.
in:  
Humanities Research Institute  *  HRI Online  *  Feedback
Version 2.0 © 2011 The University of Sheffield