Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Gifford

In 1559 Henry Smith, with Gifford, his companion, returned from Louvain and hanged himself. 1570, p. 2305, 1576, p. 1995, 1583, p. 2104.

 
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Henry Smith

(d. 1559)

Lawyer. Of Campden, Gloucesteshire.

Henry Smith fell into sinister company and forsook the gospel. 1570, p. 2304, 1576, p. 1995, 1583, p. 2104.

In 1559 Smith, with Gifford, his companion, returned from Louvain and hanged himself. 1570, p. 2305, 1576, p. 1995, 1583, p. 2104.

 
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Heynes

Minister. Of Cornwall.

Heynes was a witness to the story of the young man who went over the edge of a bridge with his horse in Cornwall. 1570, p. 2304, 1576, p. 1995, 1583, p. 2104.

 
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John Williams of Thame

(1500? - 1559)

1st Baron Williams of Thame (1554 - 1559) (DNB)

Sir John Williams was ordered by the privy council to convey Cranmer, Ridley and Latimer from the Tower of London to Oxford, 10 March 1555 (1583, p. 1428).

[NB: APC IV (1552 - 1554), p. 406, has an order to the lieutenant of the Tower to deliver Cranmer, Ridley and Latimer to him (dated 8 March 1553 [1554]), but it has no order to Williams dated 10 March. Foxe's source for this, however, must have been privy council records; this particular entry must have been lost].

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Williams conveyed Cranmer, Ridley and Latimer to Oxford in his capacity as sheriff of Oxfordshire.Elizabeth was released from the Tower into his custody; he treated her gently and courteously (1563, p. 1004; 1570, p. 1642; 1576, p. 1401; 1583, p. 1471).

Williams greeted Philip, the son of Charles V, on his arrival at Southampton on 20 July 1554 (1570, p. 1642; 1576, p. 1401; 1583, p. 1471).

Ridley spoke with Lord Williams before his martyrdom. 1563, p. 1379, 1570, p. 1937, 1576, p. 1662, 1583, p. 1769.

Lord Williams, Lord Chandos, Sir Thomas Bridges and Sir John Browne arrived in Oxford, prior to Cranmer's martyrdom. 1563, p. 1498, 1570, p. 2063, 1576, p. 1780, 1583, p. 1885.

After Wyatt's rebellion, Lord Williams of Thame went to see Elizabeth at Ashridge and found her to be unwell. 1563, p. 1711, 1570, p. 2288, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2091.

Benifield was not happy at the treatment Elizabeth received when she was at the house of Lord Williams of Thame. 1563, p. 1713, 1570, p. 2289, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2090.

Foxe recounts Benifield's behaviour towards Elizabeth when she stayed at the house of Lord Williams of Thame. 1563, p. 1713, 1570, p. 2289, 1576, p. 1982, 1583, p. 2090.

[The fact that Williams summoned John Jewel to his deathbed in 1569 may indicate that Williams had protestant sympathies (DNB)].

 
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Nicholas Ridley

(d. 1555) (DNB)

Bishop of London (1550 - 1553). Martyr. [DNB]

Nicholas Ridley gave John Rogers a prebend in St Paul's (1563, p. 1023; 1570, p. 1656; 1576, p. 1413; 1583, p. 1484).

He led the bishops who compelled John Hooper to wear vestments at his consecration. Ridley wrote a letter to Hooper apologising for this in Mary's reign (1563, pp. 1050-2; 1570, pp. 1676-7; 1576, p. 1404; 1583, pp. 1504-5).

He preached a sermon at Paul's Cross, at the behest of the privy council, supporting Jane Grey's claim to the throne. After Mary's accession Ridley visited the queen at Framlingham and was arrested (1563, p. 903; 1570, p. 1569; 1576, p. 1338; and 1583, p. 1408).

He was engaged, over dinner with John Feckenham and Sir John Bourne, in a debate on the nature of the eucharist. An account of the debate, 'penned with his own hand,' is first printed in 1563, (1563, pp. 928-31; 1570, pp. 1589-91; 1576, pp. 1356-58; and 1583, pp. 1426-28). There is no earlier printed version or manuscript of the exchange.

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Ridley was examined by Weston and the other members of the catholic delegation to the Oxford disputations on Saturday 14 April 1554 (1563, p. 933 and 937-38; 1570, p. 1593; 1576, p. 1935 [recte 1359]; 1583, pp. 1429-30).

[NB: There is a summary of Ridley's disputation on Tuesday 17 April 1554 which was printed in its entirety only in 1563, pp 933-34].

Ridley disputed with Richard Smith and the other catholic doctors on 17 April 1554 (1563, p. 957-78; 1570, pp. 1606-22; 1576, pp. 1370-84; 1583, pp. 1441-54).

Ridley's preface to his account of the disputation is 1563, pp. 956-57 and (in a differently worded version) 1570, p. 1632; 1576, pp. 1392-93; 1583, p. 1463.

Ridley's conclusion to his account of the Oxford disputations is printed (only) in 1563, p. 978.

Ridley wrote to Weston protesting the conduct of the 1554 Oxford disputations and demanding that Ridley's written responses to the three propositions be shown to the higher house of convocation (1563, p. 977; 1570, p. 1633; 1576, pp. 1393-94; 1583, p. 1464).

The queen's letter ordering Ridley, together with Cranmer and Latimer, to be held in the custody of the mayor and bailiffs of Oxford during the disputation is printed in 1563, p. 999.

He was summoned, together with Cranmer and Latimer, before Weston and the commissioners on 20 April 1554. He refused to recant what he had said during the disputations. He was condemned and taken to the sheriff's house (1563, pp. 935-38; 1570, pp. 1632-33; 1576, p. 1393; 1583, pp. 1463-64).

On 21 April 1554, Ridley was compelled to observe, having been brought from the sheriff's house, a procession in which Weston carried the sacrament and four doctors carried a canopy over Weston (1563, p. 936; 1570, p. 1633; 1576, p. 1393; 1583, p. 1464).

Ridley wrote a letter to Cranmer, which was sent together with copies of his account of the disputation and news of recent developments (1570, pp. 1633-34; 1576, p. 1394; 1583, pp. 1464).

Foxe mentions Ridley's condemnation and disputation in passing in 1570, p. 1639; 1576, p. 1399; 1583, p. 1469.

In a letter of 10 October 1554, Heinrich Bullinger asked John Hooper to pass his commendations toRidley, Hugh Latimer and Thomas Cranmer (1570, p. 1692; 1576, pp. 1444-45; 1583, p. 1518).

Ridley was one of the authors of a petition to Philip and Mary asking them for a chance to defend, in public debate, the Edwardian religious reforms (1570, p. 1656; 1576, p. 1413; 1583, p. 1483).

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Ridley, Thomas Cranmer and Hugh Latimer from the Marshalsea(1563, pp. 1042-43; 1570, pp. 1667-68; 1576, pp. 1422-23; 1583, pp. 1496-97).

Foxe describes Ridley's character. 1563, p. 1283, 1570, p. 1895, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, p. 1717.

John Bradford was persuaded to enter the ministry by Ridley. Ridley called Bradford to take the position of deacon and, at Bradford's willing, ordered him deacon. 1563, p. 1173, 1570, p. 1780, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, pp. 1603-04.

He led the bishops who compelled John Hooper to wear vestments at his consecration. Ridley wrote a letter to Hooper apologising for this in Mary's reign. 1563, pp. 1050-2; 1570, pp. 1676-7; 1576, p. 1404; 1583, pp. 1504-5.

In a letter of 10 October 1554, Heinrich Bullinger asked John Hooper to pass his commendations to Ridley, Hugh Latimer and Thomas Cranmer. 1570, p. 1692; 1576, pp. 1444-45; 1583, p. 1518.

Ridley was one of the authors of a petition to Philip and Mary asking them for a chance to defend, in public debate, the Edwardian religious reforms. 1570, p. 1656; 1576, p. 1413; 1583, p. 1483.

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Ridley, Thomas Cranmer and Hugh Latimer from the Marshalsea.1563, pp. 1042-43; 1570, pp. 1667-68; 1576, pp. 1422-23; 1583, pp. 1496-97.

During Bradford's second examination, Doctor Seton described Ridley and Latimer as being unable to answer anything at all at their examinations. 1570, p. 1786, 1576, p. 1526, 1583, p. 1607.

John Bradford sent a letter to Cranmer, Latimer and Ridley. 1570, p. 1815 1576, p. 1551, 1583, p. 1634.

Rowland Taylor wrote a letter to Thomas Cranmer, Nicholas Ridley and Hugh Latimer when they were prisoners in Oxford. 1570, p. 2072; 1576, p. 1787; 1583, p. 1893.

Foxe recounts the life of Ridley. 1563, pp. 1283-96, 1570, pp. 1895-96, 1576, pp. 1623-24, 1583, pp. 1717-30.

Ridley was kind to Heath, archbishop of York during Edward VI's reign. 1563, p. 1285, 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, p. 1717.

Ridley was kind to Edmund Bonner's mother. She would dine at Ridley's manor in Fulham with Ridley and Mistress Mungey, Bonner's sister. 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, p. 1717.

Ridley's sister and her husband, George Shipside, were also kind to Bonner's mother and sister. 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, pp. 1717-18.

Ridley was converted through the reading of Bertram's Book of the Sacrament, and confirmed in his beliefs through conference with Cranmer and Peter Martyr. 1563, p. 1285, 1570, p. 1895, 1576, p. 1623, 1583, p. 1717.

After Mary's accession, Ridley was kept first in the Tower, then in the Bocardo in Oxford, and then held in custody at Master Irish's house until his death. 1563, p. 1285, 1570, p. 1896, 1576, p. 1624, 1583, p. 1717.

Ridley was cast into Bocardo prison with Hugh Latimer. 1563, p. 1285, 1583, p. 1718.

A conference took place between Ridley and Latimer in prison on the objections of Antonian, in other words, those of a popish persecutor, such as Winchester. 1563, pp. 1285-94, 1583, pp. 1718-24.

Letters of Ridley. 1570, pp. 1896-1902, 1576, pp. 1624-30, 1583, pp. 1724-30.

A letter was sent by Ridley to West, in which Ridley asked West and also Dr Harvey to remember their promises to him. Foxe also includes West's letter and Ridley's response. 1570, pp. 1900-01, 1576, pp. 1627-28, 1583, pp. 1728-29.

Grindal wrote to Ridley from his exile in Frankfort, to which letter Ridley replied. He mentioned his imprisonment with Cranmer, Latimer and Bradford. He mentioned that he knew that Ferrar, Hooper, Rogers, Taylor of Hadleigh, Saunders and Tomkins, a weaver, had all been martyred, as had Cardmaker the day before he wrote this letter. He had heard that West had relented, and Grimald been cast into the Marshalsea. He had also heard that Thomas Ridley, of the Bull-head in Cheapside, had died. He had heard that his brother-in-law, Shipside, had spent much time in prison but was now released. 1570, pp. 1901-02, 1576, pp. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1729-30.

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The examination of Ridley and Latimer by White (Lincoln) and Brookes (Gloucester) took place on 30 September 1555. White and Brookes received their commission from Cardinal Poole. 1563, pp. 1297-98, 1570, pp. 1903-09, 1576, pp. 1631-39, 1583, pp. 1757-60.

A communication took place between Ridley and Brookes in Irish's house on 15 October, on which day he was degraded, and at which Edridge ('reader then of the Greek lecture') was present.. 1563, pp. 1374-76, 1570, pp. 1934-35, 1576, pp. 1659-60, 1583, pp. 1768-69.

Ridley had a discussion with Brookes on 16 October, on which day he was degraded. 1563, pp. 1374-76.

Foxe recounts the behaviour of Ridley at supper the night before he was martyred. 1563, pp. 1376-79, 1570, pp. 1936-37, 1576, p. 1661, 1583, p. 1769.

Foxe recounts the behaviour of Ridley and Latimer at their martyrdom. 1563, pp. 1376-1379, 1570, pp. 1937-39, 1576, pp. 1661-62, 1583, p. 1769.

Ridley gave his gown and tippet to Shipside. 1563, p. 1377, 1570, p. 1937, 1576, p. 1661, 1583, p. 1769.

Ridley gave a new groat to Henry Lea. 1563, p. 1377, 1570, p. 1937, 1576, p. 1661, 1583, p. 1769.

Ridley spoke with Lord Williams before his martyrdom. 1563, p. 1379, 1570, p. 1937, 1576, p. 1662, 1583, p. 1769.

Ridley's friendly farewell. 1563, pp. 1379-81, 1570, pp. 1939-43, 1576, pp. 1622-28, 1583, pp. 1770-76.

Ridley's lamentation for a change in religion, in which he makes reference to Latimer, Lever, Bradford and Knox, as well as Cranmer and their part in the duke of Somerset's cause. 1570, pp. 1945-50, 1576, pp. 1670-78, 1583, pp. 1778-84.

Cranmer was confirmed in his reformist beliefs after conference with Ridley. 1570, p. 2045, 1576, p. 1763, 1583, p. 1870.

Cranmer was examined by Bonner and Ely and condemned on 12 September 1556 (seven days before the condemnation of Ridley and Latimer). 1563, pp. 1491-92, 1570, p. 2046, 1576, p. 1765, 1583, p. 1871.

In the third year of Edward's reign, Cranmer and Nicholas Ridley admitted Robert Drakes to minister the sacraments. 1563, p. 1505, 1570, p. 2074, 1576, p. 1788, 1583, p. 1895.

Letter to Augustine Bernher [BL, Harley 416, fo.16v. Printed in LM, p. 72 et seq. Also in 1570, p. 1902 et seq.].

Letter to Augustine Bernher [BL Harley 416, fos.17v and 32r. Not printed in Foxe or LM].

Letter to Bernher [BL Harley 416, fo.32r. Not printed in AM or LM.]

Letter to Bradford. [BL Harley 416, fo.32v. Printed in LM, pp. 62 et seq. and 1570, p. 1897 et seq.]

Foxe records Nicholas Ridley's writings against idolatry. 1583, pp. 2128-31.

Lord Dacre would have paid a ransom to Mary for his kinsman Nicholas Ridley's life if it were possible but she refused. 1563, p. 1733, 1583, p. 2131.

 
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Sebastian Hofmeister (Latin: Oeconomus)

(1476 - 1532)

Swiss reformer, native of Schaffhausen. He was best known as a skillful participant in various disputations. Foxe's only mention of him was in the context of his sudden death on his way to Ratisbon in order to participate in a disputation on behalf of the Zurich protestants. 1570, p. 2305, 1576, p. 1996, 1583, p. 2105. (Hans J. Hillerbrand, ed. The Oxford Encyclopaedia of the Reformation. 4 vols. (Oxford: 1996) 2, p. 243).

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Thomas Drury

(d. 1556)

A blind boy. Martyr. Of Gloucester.

Thomas Drowry was imprisoned for 'confessing of the truth'; Drowry received permission to visit John Hooper on the eve of the bishop's execution. Hooper questioned him about his religious beliefs and praised him for his faith. 1563, p. 1059; 1570, p. 1682; 1576, p. 1435; 1583, p. 1509.

[NB: Foxe does not name Drowry in these passages; he merely describes him as a blind boy of Gloucester.]

Drowry was confirmed in his faith by Hooper. 1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1911.

Thomas Drowry was brought before Dr Williams, chancellor of Gloucester. 1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1911.

He was burned around 15 May 1556. 1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1911.

Foxe received testimony of Thomas Dowry's death from the registrar of Gloucester, John Taylor (alias Barker). 1563, p. 1521, 1570, p. 2092, 1576, p. 1793, 1583, p. 1911.

 
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Twyford

Of London.

Set up stakes in London for martyrs in Henry VIII's reign.

Early in Elizabeth's reign Twyford became very sick and rotted to death.

 
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Chipping Campden
Camden
NGR: SP 155 394

A parish in the upper division of the hundred of Kiftsgate, county of Gloucester, comprising the market town of Chipping Campden and three hamlets. 29 miles north-east by east from Gloucester. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Gloucester

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Chipping Norton
Chipping Norton
NGR: SP 315 266

A market town and parish, having exclusive jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Chadlington, county of Oxford. 18 miles north by west from Oxford. The living is a discharged vicarage in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Oxford

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Gloucester
Gloucester
NGR: SO 830 187

A city and county of itself, locally in the hundred of Dudstone and Kings Barton, county of Gloucester. 34 miles north-north-east from Bristol. The city comprises the parishes of St. Aldate, St. John Baptist, St. Mary de Crypt, St. Mary de Grace, St. Nicholas, St. Owen and Holy Trinity; also parts of St. Catherine, St. Mary de Lode and St. Michael, all in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Gloucester, of which it is the seat. St. John Baptist, St. Mary de Crypt and St. Michael are discharged rectories; St. Mary de Lode and Holy Trinity are discharged vicarages; St. Aldate, St. Catherine, St. Mary de Grace and St. Nicholas are perpetual curacies

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2129 [2105]

Queene Mary. Gods punishment vpon persecutors and contemners of the Gospell.

MarginaliaAnno 1558.geue answere and account for euery idle word.

MarginaliaGentle exhortatiō neglected.The Gentleman taking snuffe therat: Why (sayd he) takest thou thought for me? take thought for thy winding sheete. Well (quoth the other) amend, for death geueth no warning: for as soone commeth a lambes skin to the market, as an olde sheepes. Gods woūdes (sayth he) care not thou for me, raging still after this maner worse & worse in words, till at length passing on theyr iourny, they came riding ouer a great bridge, stāding ouer a piece of an arme of the sea. MarginaliaThe terrible ende of a swearer.Vpon the which bridge this Gentleman swearer spurred his horse in such sort,  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 645, line 16

See Sir Thomas More's Dialogue on Tribulation, II. 5.
"His horse, as he had caught his master's mood,
Snorting, and starting into sudden rage,
Unbidden, and not now to be controll'd,
Rushed to the cliff, and, having reached it, stood!
At once the shock unseated him; he flew
Sheer o'er the craggy barrier," &c.
Cowper's Task, bk. vi.

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as he sprang cleane ouer with the man on his backe. Who as he was going, cryed, saying: horse & man, and all to the deuill. This terrible story happening in a Towne in Cornewall, I would haue bene afrayde amongest these storyes here to recite, were it not that he which was then both reprehender of his swearing & witnes of his death, is yet aliue, and now a Minister, named Heynes. Besides this, also bishop Ridley thē bishop of London, preached and vttred euen the same fact and example at Paules Crosse. The name of the Gentleman I could by no meanes obteyne of the party & witnes aforesayd, for dread of those (as he sayd) which yet remaine of his affinity and kinred in the sayd country.

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Hauing now sufficiently admonished, first the Courtyers, then the gentlemen: now thirdly for a briefe admonition to the Lawyers, we will here insert the strange end and death of one Henry Smith student of the law.

MarginaliaThe miserable ende of Henry Smith a Lawier of the midle Temple after he was peruerted from the Gospell.This Henry Smyth hauing a Godly Gentleman to his father. & an auncient protestant, dwelling in Camden, in Glocester shyre, was by him vertuously brought vp in the knowledge of Gods word, & sincere religion: wherin he shewed himselfe in the beginning, suche an earnest professor, that he was called of the Papistes, pratling Smith. After these good beginnings it folowed, that he cōming to be a student of the law in the middle Temple at London, MarginaliaNote what leude company doth in corrupting good natures.there through sinister cōpany of some, & especially as it is thought, of one Gifford, began to be peruerted to popery, & afterward going to Louane, was more deepely rooted & groūded in the same: and so continuing a certayne space amōg the papistes, of a yong protestant, at lēgth was made a perfect papist. In so much, that returning from thēce, MarginaliaM. Smithes Images and Agnus dei.he brought with him pardōs, a Crucifixe, with an Agnus dei, which he vsed cōmonly to weare about his necke, & had in his chamber images before which he was woont to pray. Besides diuers other Popish trashe, whiche he brought with hym from Louane. Now what ende followed after this, I were loth to vtter in story, but that the fact so lately done this present yeare, ann. 1569. remayneth yet so fresh in memorie, that almost all the Citie of London not onely can witnesse, but also doth wonder thereat. The end was this.

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Not long after, the said Henry Smith with Gifforde his companion, was returned from Louane, beyng now a foule gierer, and a scornfull scoffer of that religion which before he professed, in his chamber where he lay in a house in S. Clements parish without Temple barre, MarginaliaHenry Smith a Lawyer hanged himselfe in his chamber, & after what maner.in the Euening as he was goyng to bedde, and his clothes put off (for he was found naked) he had tied his shirt, (which he had torne to the same purpose) about his priuy places, and so with his owne girdle, or ribond garter (as it seemed) fastned to the bedpost, there strangled himselfe. They that were of his Quest and other, which saw the maner of hys hanging, and the print where he sate vpon his bed side, do record that he tkrust himselfe downe from his beddes side where he sate, the place where he had fastned the girdle beyng so low, that his hips well nere touched the floore, his legs lying a crosse, and his armes spred abroad. And this was the maner of his hangyng, hauyng his Agnus Dei, in a siluer tablet with his other idolatrous trash in the window by him. And thus being dead and not thought worthy to be interred in the Churchyard, he was buried in a Lane, called Foskew Lane.

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This heauy and dreadfull ende of Henry Smith, although it might seeme enough to gender a terrour to all yong popish students of law: yet it did not so worke with all, but that some remayned as obstinate still as they were before. Amongst whom was one named MarginaliaOne Williams a Lawyer, and a rayler agaynst the Gospell, fell madde.Williams, a student of the Inner Temple, who beyng sometyme a fauourer of the Gospell, fell in like maner from that, to be an obstinate Papist, a despitefull railer agaynst true religion, and in conclusion was so hote in his catholike zeale, that in the midst of his railing, he fell starke madde, and so yet to this present day remaineth. The Lord of his mercy turne him to a better mynd, and conuert him, if it bee hys pleasure, Amen.

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The miserable ende of Twyford is here no lesse to bee

remembred, MarginaliaOf the miserable end of this Twyford, read before pag. 1258. a busie doer sometymes in K. Henries dayes by Boners appointment, in settyng vp of stakes for the burnyng of poore Martyrs. Who when he sawe the stakes consume away so fast: yea sayd hee, will not these stakes hold? I will haue a stake (I trow, that shall hold, and so prouided a big tree, and cuttyng of the top, set it in Smith field. But thanks be to God, or euer the tree was all consumed, God turned the state of Religion, and hee fell into an horrible disease, rottyng alyue aboue the ground before he died. Read more of hym, pag. 1258. But because the story both of hym and of a number such other lyke, is to bee founde in sundry places of this history sufficiently before expressed, it shall be but a double labour agayne to recapitulate the same.

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Ye haue heard before, pag. 1911. of the condemnation and Martyrdome of a certain boy called Tho. Drowry, condemned by Williams Chauncellour of Gloucester, contrary to all right and counsaile of the Register then present, called Barker.  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 647, line 1

The name of John Tayler, alias Barker, occurs soon after the foundation of the bishopric of Gloucester, and under August 31st, 1569. (See Rudder's Hist. of Gloucestershire.)

Now what punishment fell after vpon the said Chancellor, followeth to be declared.

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¶ The strange and fearefull death of the same Doctor Williams. 
Commentary  *  Close

This account was sent to Foxe by John Louth, the archdeacon of Nottingham, in 1579. It survives among Foxe's papers as BL, Harley MS 425, fo. 136r-v.

WHen God of his inestimable mercy hauing pitie of vs, and pardoning our sinnes for hys sonnes sake Christ Iesu, had now taken from vs that bloudy Princesse, and sent vs this iewel of Ioy, the Queenes maiestie that now raigneth (and long might she raigne) ouer vs: and that the commissioners for restitution of religion wer comming toward Glocester. The same day D. Williams the Chauncellour, dined with W. Ienings the Deane of Gloucester,  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 647, line 9

William Jennings was appointed first Dean of Gloucester by the charter of foundation, September 3rd, 1541, and died November 4th, 1565. (See Rudder's Hist. of Gloucestershire.)

who with all his men were booted redy at one of the clocke to set forward to Chipping Norton, aboute xv. miles from Gloucester, to meete the Commissioners which were at Chipping Norton, and sayd to him, Chancellor, are not thy bootes on?

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Chanc. Why should I put them on?

To go with me (quoth the Deane) to meet these commissioners.

Chanc. I will neither meet them, nor see them.

Deane. Thou must needs see them, for now it is past xij. of the clocke, and they will be here afore iij. of the clocke, and therfore if thou be wise, on with thy bootes and let vs goe together, and all shall be well.

Chanc. Go you wayes M. Deane, I will neuer see them.

As I sayd, W. Ienings the Deane set forward wyth his company toward the Commissioners, and by and by commeth one vpon horsebacke to the Deane, saying: M. Chancellor lyeth at the mercy of God, and is speachlesse. At that worde the Deane with his company pricked forward to the Commissioners, and tolde them the whole matter and communication betwene them two, as aboue. And they sent one of their men with the best wordes they could deuise, to comfort him with many promises. But to be short: albeit the Commissioners were now nerer Glocester, then the Deane and his company thought, making very great hast, especially after they hadde receyued these newes. Yet Doct. Williams, though false of religion, yet true of his promise, kept his vngracious couenaunt with the Deane: for he was dead or they came to the citie, and so neuer saw them in deed. 

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Addenda: ref page 647, bottom

This account of Dr. Williams's death was furnished to Foxe by the before-mentioned John Loude, who states that he had it from Dean Jennings himself.

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Wherefore, to passe ouer our owne domesticall examples of English persecuters plagued by Gods hād (wherof this our present story doth abound) I will stretche my penne a little further a adioyne withall a few like examples in forraine countries. MarginaliaDeclaratiō of foreine examples.

Foraine Examples. 
Commentary  *  Close

In contrast to the tales of divine punishment in England which Foxe related, which came from individual informants, the tales of instances of divine punishment in foreign countries were either allusions to instances previously recounted in the Acts and Monuments or were taken from Continental works which Foxe had read.

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MarginaliaHofmeister sodainely stricken with death going to Ratisbone.HOfmeister the great Archpapist, and chiefe maisterpiller of the Popes fallyng Church, as hee was in hys iourney  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 647, line 10 from the bottom

There seems to be some mistake here. Hofmeister, who was a monk of the Augustinian order, attended the second Conference at Ratisbon in 1546, and spoke on the 20th of February. See Actorum Colloquii Ratisbonensis ult. narratio; Lovanii, 1547; and Sleidan, tom. ii. 416, Edit. 1786.
He died in fact at Gunzburg, in 1547, in his thirty-eight year, having according to Romish authority, been poisoned by the heretics! - "Astu et dolo hæreticorum creditur interiisse. Sic enim Seripandus ... in suo diario notavit: Mortuus igitur est Hoffmaisterus, ut credebatur hæreticorum extinctus veneno." Ossingeri Biblioth. Augustiniana (Ingoldst. 1768), p. 448.
The sentiments of Hoffmeister were on some points, however, of so liberal a caste, that his own so-called Catholic brethren might be inclined to get rid of him in some noiseless way. See Rivet's Grotianæ Discussionis Dialysis, sect. 1, ¶ 20; sect. 5, ¶ 11. See also Wolfii Lectiones Memorabiles, tom. ii. 516-17, Edit. 1672, which, in some measure, supports Foxe's representation.

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goyng toward the Councell of Ratisbone, to dispute agaynst the defenders of Christes gospel, sodainly in his iourney, not farre from Vlmes, was preuented by the stroke of Gods hand, and there miserably died, with horrible roring and crying out. Ex Illyrico de vocabulo fidei.

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MarginaliaWhat inconuenience commeth by the Popes desperate doctrine.What a pernitious and pestilent doctrine is this of the papists, which leadeth men to seeke their saluation by merites and workes of the lawe, and not by faith onelye in Christ the sonne of God, and to stay themselues by grace? And what inconuenience this doctrine of doubting & desperation bringeth men to at length, if the playne word of

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God
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