Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
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Castellanus

Castellanus' strange death at Orléans is referred to in a letter to Henri II (1570, pp. 2309-10, 1576, pp. 1999-2000, 1583, pp. 2108-09).

 
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Claude de Asses (i.e. Claude d'Assas)

Foxe simply mentions Claude de Asses in the context of his condemning a man to death, after which he died of apoplexy in the act of fornicating with one of his servants (1570, p. 2310, 1576, p. 2000, 1583, p. 2109).

 
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John Andrew (Jean André)

Foxe refers to Jean André as a bookbinder by appointment to the French king Henri II and a spy for the président at the parlement of Paris, Pierre Lizet. In reality, he was a noted libraire in Paris. Foxe's main reference to him concerned his insanity, shortly before his death, an illness which is not confirmed in other sources (1570, p. 2309, 1576, p. 1999, 1583, p. 2108).

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John Morin

Lieutenant of the provost of Paris.

John Morin was stricken with a disease known as 'the Wolves' that paralysed his legs and feet, which sent him insane. His condition is referred to in a letter to Henri II (1570, pp. 2309-10, 1576, pp. 1999-2000, 1583, pp. 2108-09).

 
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Peter Liset (Pierre Lizet)

Pierre Lizet was a noted avocat before the parlement of Paris before becoming a magistrate there and président of the parlement. Foxe described him as the 'author' of the special tribunal within the parlement, established to pursue the legal prosecution of heretics in November 1547 (the 'Chambre Ardente' or 'burning chamber') - although, in reality, his involvement was simply as its president. Foxe was more interested in his removal from office, reporting that he had lost his sanity (1570, pp. 2309-10, 1576, pp. 1999-2000, 1583, pp. 2108-09). In reality, his retirement in 1550 was as a result of court intrigue. In his retirement, he occupied himself in writing a legal handbook and fashioning himself as an anti-protestant religious polemicist.

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2133 [2109]

Queene Mary. Gods punishment vpon persecutors, and contemners of the Gospell.

MarginaliaAnno 1558.ryng, bounsing of boordes, and ratling of chaines, enough to make some man starke mad. The Erle hearing the sodaine noyse, and beyng somewhat peraduenture afraid at the first, although he had not then the feate of coniuring, yet taking a good hart vnto him, & running to his sword, he layd about him well fauoredly, and followyng still the noyse of the deuill, so coniured him at last, that the monke which counterfeited the deuill in iest, was slayne in hys owne likenes in earnest. Ex Gaspare Bruschio, in Chronologia Monasteriorum Germaniæ. MarginaliaThe punishmēt of God vpon a Monke that would counterfeite the deuill. MarginaliaEx Gaspare Bruschio in Chronologia Monasteriorum Germaniæ. MarginaliaRead afore pag. 890.

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After the imprisonment of the congregation, which were taken hearyng Gods word in S. Iames streete in Paris, an. 1558. (as is aboue storied) was a letter written to the king, which was diuulgate abroad, proouing & declaring by diuers histories, what afflictions and calamities from tyme to tyme, by Gods righteous iudgement haue fallen vppon such as haue bene enemies to his people, and haue resisted the free passage of his holy word. In which letter, forsomuch as beside the sayd examples, much other good fruitfull matter is conteined, worthy of all mē to be read, and especially of Princes to bee considered, I thought here good to copy out the whole, as the Frenche booke doth geue it. The translation of the which letter into English, is after this tenor, as followeth.

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¶ A Letter translated out of French into English, written to K. Henry the 2. French kyng. 
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This letter is reprinted from Pierre de la Place, Commentaires de l'estatde la Religion et Republique sous Rois Henry et François seconds et Charles neusieme [Paris: 1565], fos. 6r-10r.

MarginaliaThe doinges of Henry 2. French king agaynst the Lutherans, neuer prospered with him.COnsider I pray you sir, and you shall finde, that all your afflictions haue come vpon you, since you haue set your selfe agaynst those which are called Lutherans.

When you made the Edict of Chasteaubriant, God sent you warres: but when ye ceased the execution of your sayde Edict, and as long as ye were enemye vnto the Pope, and goyng into Almanie for the defence of the libertie of the Germaines afflicted for Religion, your affaires prospered as ye would wishe or desire.

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On the contrary, what hath become vpō you since you were ioyned with the Pope agayne, hauing receiued a sword from him for his own safegard? MarginaliaThis truce was betweene the French king, & the Emperour, which the Pope caused to be broken.And who was it that caused you to breake the truce? God hath turned in a moment your prosperities into such afflictions, that they touch not onely the state of your own person, but of your kingdome also.

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MarginaliaThe cruell purpose of the Duke of Guise disappointed.To what end became the enterprise of the Duke of Guise in Italy, goyng about the seruice of the enemy of God, and purposing after his returne to destroy the Vallies of Piemont, to offer or sacrifice them to God for his victories? The euent hath well declared, that God can turne vpsidedowne our counsailes and enterprises: MarginaliaThe wicked vowe of the Constable of Fraunce defeated.as he ouerturned of late the enterprise of the Constable of Fraunce at S. Quintins, hauyng vowed to God, that at his returne, he would go and destroy Geneua when he had gotten the victory.

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MarginaliaLord Ponchet Archbishop of Tours. MarginaliaThe maruelous iudgement of God vpon a burning persecutour.Haue you not heard of L. Ponchet Archbish. of Toures, who made sute for the erection of a Court called Chamber Ardente, wherein to condemne the Protestantes to the fire? who afterwardes was striken with a disease called the fire of God: whiche began at his feete, and so ascended vpward, that he caused one member after another to be cut off, and so died miserably without any remedy?

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MarginaliaGods fearefull hand vpon Castellanus persecutour.Also one Castellanus, who hauyng enriched himselfe by the Gospell, and forsaking the pure doctrine thereof, to returne vnto his vomite again, went about to persecute the Christians at Orleans, & by the hand of God was striken in his body with a sickenes vnknowen to the Phisitions, the one halfe of his body burnyng as whote as fire, and the other as colde as Ise: and so most miserably crying and lamentyng, ended his lyfe.

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MarginaliaLegate Du Prat the first beginner of persecution agaynst the faythfull horribly plagued.There be other infinite examples of Gods iudgements worthy to be remembred: as the death of the Chauncellour and Legate du Prat, which was the first that opened to the Parliament, the knowledge of heresies, and gaue out the first Commissions to put the faythfull to death, who afterwarde died in his house at Natoillet, swearyng and horribly blasphemyng GOD, and hys stomacke was founde pierced and gnawen a sunder wyth wormes.

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MarginaliaIohn Ruse comming from accusing the faythfull, was terribly stricken with Gods hand.Also Iohn Ruse, Counsailor in the Parliament, comming frō the Court after he had made report of the processe agaynst the poore innocentes, was taken with a burnyng in the lower parte of his belly, and before he could be brought home to his house, the fire inuaded all his secret partes, and so hee died miserably, burnyng all his belly ouer, without any signe or token of the acknowledging of God.

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MarginaliaThe wicked end of Claude de Asses a wicked persecutour.Also one named Claude de Asses, a Counsailour in the sayd Courte, the sayde day that he gaue his opinion and consent to burne a faythfull Christian (albeit it was not done in deede as he would haue it) after he had dyned, committed whoredome with a seruaunte in the house, and euen in doyng the acte, was striken with a disease called Apoplexia, whereof he dyed out of hande.

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MarginaliaPeter Lyset author of the burning chamber, plagued.Peter Liset, chiefe President of the sayd Courte, and one of the authors of the forsayd burnyng chamber, was deposed frō his office, for beyng known to be out of his right wit and bereaued of his vnderstandyng.

MarginaliaThe mighty hand of God vpon Iohn Morin a greeuous persecutor.Also Iohn Morin, Lieuetenaunt Criminall of the Prouost of Paris, after he had bene the cause of the death of many christians, was finally stiken with a disease in his legs called the Wolues: whereby he lost the vse of them, & died also out of his wits, many dayes before, denieng and blaspheming God.

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MarginaliaIohn Andrew Booke bynder, plagued.Likewise Iohn Andrew, Bookebinder of the Pallace, a spie for the President Liset, and of Bruseard the kings sollicitor, died in a fury and madnes.

MarginaliaThe terrible vengeance of God vpō Iohn de Roma a terrible persecutor.The Inquisitor Iohn de Roma in Prouence, his flesh fell from hym by peeee meale, so stinkyng that no man might come nere hym.

MarginaliaIohn Minerius a cruell persecutour plagued of God.Also Iohn Minerius of Prouence, which was the cause of the death of a great number of men, women, and children, at Cabriers & at Merindol, died with bleeding in the lower partes, the fire hauing take his belly, blaspheming and despising of God, besides many other wherof we might make recital which were punished with the like kynd of death.

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MarginaliaThe French king by sundry sortes of troubles warned of God.It may please your maiesty to remember your self that ye had no sooner determined to set vpon vs, but new troubles were by and by moued by your enemies, with whom ye could come to no agreement, which God would not suffer, for as much as your peace was grounded vpon the persecution which ye pretended against Gods seruauntes: As also your Cardinals can not let through their crueltie the course of the Gospell, which hath taken such roote in your realme, that if God should geue you leaue to destroy the professors thereof, you should bee almost a kyng without subiects.

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Tertullian hath well sayde, that the bloud of Martyrs is the seed of the Gospell. MarginaliaRiches and Pride of the Clergy, the fountayne of all euills.Wherfore to take away all these euyls commyng of the riches of the papistes, which cause so much whoredome, Sodomitrie, and incest, wherein they wallowe lyke hogs, feeding their idle bellies: the best way were to put them from their lands and possessions, as the old sacrifising Leuits were, according to the expresse commaundement which was geuen to Iosua. For as long as the ordinance of God tooke place, and that they were voyde of ambition, the puritie of religion remayned whole and perfect: but when they began to aspire to principalitie, riches, and worldly honours, then began the abhomination of desolation that Christ found out.

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MarginaliaThe purenes of the primatiue church how long it continued and whereby.It was euen so in the Primatiue church: for it flourished & continued in all purenesse, as long as the Ministers were of smal wealth, and sought not their particuler profite, but the glorye of God onely. For since the Popes began to be princelike and to vsurpe the dominion of the Empire vnder the colour of a fals donation of Constantine, MarginaliaThe false Donation of Constantine. they haue turned the Scriptures from their true sense, and haue attributed the seruice to themselues, which we owe to God. MarginaliaExhortation to the king to seise vpon the temporalityes of the Clergye.Wherefore your Maiestie may seise with good right vpon all the temporalties of the benefices, and that with a safe conscience for to employ them to their true & right vse.

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MarginaliaThe ryches of the Popes Clergye how they ought to be employed.First, for the findyng and maintainyng of the faithfull Ministers of the word of God, for such liuyngs as shall be requisite for them, accordyng as the case shall require. Secondly, for the entertainment of your Iustices that geue iudgement. Thirdly, for the relieuyng of the poore, and maintenance of Colledges to instruct the poore youth in that which they shall be most apte vnto. And the rest, which is infinite, may remayne for the entertainment of your owne estate and affaires, to the great easement of your poore people, which alone beare the burthen, and possesse in maner nothyng.

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In this doyng, an infinite number of men, and euen of your Nobilitie, which lyue of the Crucifix, should employ themselues to your seruice and the common wealths so much the more diligently, as they see that ye recompence none but those that haue deserued: where as now there is an infinite number of men in your kingdome, which occupy the chiefest & greatest benefices, which neuer deserued any part of them, &c. And thus much touching the superfluous possessions of the Popes Lordly Clergie. Now procedyng futher in this exhortation to the king, thus the letter importeth.

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MarginaliaThe malicious and lying slaunders of the Papists to bring the true Gospellers in hatred with Princes.But when the Papists see that they haue not to alleadge for themselues any reason, they assay to make odious to your maiesty the Lutherans (as they call vs) and say: if their sayinges take place, ye shall be faine to remaine a priuate person: & that there is neuer change of religion, but there is also chaunge of princedome. A thyng as false as when they accuse vs to be Sacramentaries, and that we deny the authoritie of Magistrates, vnder the shadow of certain furious Anabaptists, which Satan hath raysed in our tyme to darken the light of the Gospell. For the histories of the Emperours which haue begun to receiue the Christian religion, and that which is come to passe in our tyme, shew the contrary.

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Was there euer Prince more feared and obeyed, then Constantine in receiuing the Christian Religion? was hee therefore

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