Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
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Names and Places on this Page
Anne Du BourgLouis Du Faur (Loys du Faur)
 
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Anne Du Bourg

(1520? - 1559)

Anne Du Bourg was a distinguished magistrate in the parlement of Paris who was condemned and executed for heresy before his own tribunal on 23 December 1559. Foxe reports his seizure on the orders of the king by the Constable de Montmorency following the famous mercuriale of the parlement of Paris on 10 June 1559 (1570, p. 2311, 1576, p. 2000, 1583, p. 2110).

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Louis Du Faur (Loys du Faur)

(1520? - 1588)

Louis Du Faur was from a notable Toulouse family of humanist magistrates, the second son of Pierre II Du Faur, fourth président of the parlement of Toulouse and its garde des sceaux. He entered the church and held numerous benefices in the southern dioceses of Toulouse, Comminges, Auch and Narbonne before being nominated conseiller-clerc of the parlement of Paris on 24 June 1555.

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Already by that date, if not shortly therefter, he was inclined towards protestantism, although it only became manifest on 10 June 1559, which was when Henri II went to the parlement of Paris and invited the magistrates to give him their views of how to bring about an ecclesiastical peace in France. Du Faur followed Anne Du Bourg and recommended the convoking of a national council of the church in which the views of the protestants would be solemnly examined and found (as he expected) not to be heretical. Henri II had him promptly arrested along with Anne Du Bourg and put in the Bastille. Foxe mentions his arrest in passing, following his source (La Place) in ascribing it to the Constable of France, Anne de Montmorency (1570, p. 2311, 1576, p. 2000, 1583, p. 2110). In fact he was arrested by the comte de Montgommery.

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In his subsequent trial alongside Anne Du Bourg he defended himself with great skill, not denying his protestant leanings but justifying his loyalty to the French crown. He was protected by family friends and eventually condemned to make reparations before being eventually restored to his position in the parlement. He spent much of the remainder of his long career in the service of the king of Navarre, becoming his chancellor. (J. Baltaux, M. Barroux, M. Prevost, and etc, eds. Dictionnaire de Biographie Française. 18 vols in progress. (Paris: Librairie Letouzey et Ané, 1932 -), 11, cols 1375-76)

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2134 [2110]

Q. Mary. The terrible end of persecutors of the Gospell.

MarginaliaAnno 1558.put from the Empire? MarginaliaConstantine confirmed in his kingdome the more, by receauing the Gospel.No, he was thereby the more confirmed & established in the same, and also his posterity which ruled themselues by his prouidence. But such as haue fallen away and folowed mens traditions, God hath destroyed, and theyr race is no more knowne in earth: So much doth God detest them forsake him

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MarginaliaExamples of England and Germany, how Princes lose no honour by the gospell. MarginaliaThe Popes religion more noysome to the state of Princes, then the doctrine of the Lutherans.And in our time the late kinges of England and Germanye, were they cōstrayned in reprouing superstitions, which the wickednes of the time had brought in, to forsake their kingdomes & princedomes? Al men see the contrary: and what honor, fidelity, and obedience the people in our time that haue receiued the reformation of the Gospell, do vnder theyr princes and superiors. Yea, I may say, that the princes knew not before what it was to be obeyed, at that time when the rude and ignoraunt people receiued so readily the dispēsations of the Pope, to driue out their owne kinges and naturall Lordes.

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MarginaliaWholesome remedy shewed agaynst the Popes pryde.The true and onely remedy, sir is, that ye cause to be holden a holy and free Counsell, where ye should be chiefe, and not the Pope & his, who ought but onely to defende their causes by the holy scriptures: that in the meane while ye may seeke out mē not corrupted, suspected, nor partial, whō ye may charge to geue report faythfully vnto you of the true sence of the holy scriptures. And this done, after the example of the good kinges Iosaphath, Ezechias, & Iosias, ye shall take out of the Churche all Idolatry, superstition, & abuse whic his found directly contrary to the holy scriptures of the old and new testament, & by that meanes ye shall guid your people in the true & pure seruice of God, not regarding in the meane time the cauilling pretenses of the papists which say, that such questiōs haue bene already answered at generall Counsels: MarginaliaA blynde shift of the Papistes to stop Princes from calling generall Councels.for it is knowne well enough, that no Counsell hath bene lawfull since the Popes haue vsurped the principality & tyranny vpon men soules, but they haue made them serue to their couetousnes, ambition, and cruelty: MarginaliaThe contrarietyes in the Popes Councells, enough for their disproofe.and the contrariety which is amōg those coūsels, maketh enough for their disproofe, beside a hundred thousand other absurdities against the word of God, which be in them. The true proofe for such matters is in the true & holy Scriptures, to the which no times nor age hath any prescription to be alledged agaynst thē: for by them we receiue the Counsels founded vpon the worde of God, and also by the same we reiect that doctrine which is repugnant.

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And if ye do thus Syr, God will blesse your enterprise, he will encrease & confirme your raigne and Empyre, and your posterity. If otherwise, MarginaliaProphesie agaynst the French king.destruction is at your gate, and vnhappy are the people which shall dwell vnder your obediēce. There is no doubt but God will hardē your hart as he did Pharaos, and take of the crowne from your head, as he did to Ieroboam, Nadab, Baza, Achab, and to many other kinges, which haue folowed mens traditions, agaynst the commaundemēt of God: and geue it to your enemies to triumph ouer you and your children.

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And if the Emperour Antonine the meeke, although he were a Pagan & Idolater, seing himselfe bewrapt with so many wars, ceased the persecutiōs, which were in his time agaynst the christians, and determined in the ende to heare their causes and reasons, how muche more ought you that beare the name of moste Christian king, to be carefull and diligent to cease the persecutions agaynst the poore Christians, seing they haue not troubled, nor doe trouble in any wise the state of your kingdome, & your affayres: considering also that the Iewes be suffered through all Christendome, although they be mortall enemies of our Lorde Iesus Christ, which we holde by common accorde and consent for our God, Redeemer, and Sauiour: and that vntill you haue heard lawfully debated, and vnderstand our reasons takē of the holy Scriptures, and that your Maiestye haue iudged, if we bee worthy of such punishmentes: For if we be not ouercome by the worde of God, the fires, the sworde, nor the cruellest tormentes shall make vs afrayd. These be the exercises that God hath promised to his, of the which he foretolde shoulde come in the laste times, that they should not be troubled when such persecutions shall come vpon them.

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Translated out of the French booke intituled, Commentaries of the state of the Church and publicke weale. &c. pag. 7. 

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 659, line 8

Commentaires de l'estat de la Religion et Republique soubs les Rois Henry et Francois second, &c.; 8vo. 1565, fol. 6-9: written by Pierre de la Place. Pierre de la Place was a native of Angouleme, and President of the Court of Aids at Paris. His history commences in 1556, and ends in 1561 with the Conference at Poissy, of which it gives an excellent journal. For a zealous Calvinist the author has written with much moderation, and as a faithful historian. Many original pieces are to be found in his work, which he introduces with skill. He was killed in the massacre of St. Bartholomew. See "Biblioth. Hist." a J. G. Meuselio, vol. vii. pt. ii. p. 227.

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¶ The story and end of the french king.

MarginaliaThe story and end of Henry 2. the French king, that would not be warned.WHosoeuer was the authour or authours of this letter aboue prefixed, herein thou seest (good Reader) good counsell geuen to the king. if he had the grace to receiue it, and had folowed the same, no doubt but Gods blessing working with him, he had not onely set that Realme in a blessed staye, from much disturbaunce, but also had continued himselfe in all florishing felicity of princely honour and dignity. For so doth the lord commonly blesse and aduaunce such kinges & Princes, as seeke hys honor, and submit their wils to his obedience. But cōmonly the fault of kinges and Potentates of this world is, that being set about with Parasites, either they seldome heare the truth told thē, or if they do, yet will they not lightly be put from theyr owne willes, disdayning to be admonished by

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their inferiors, be theyr counsell neuer so holsom & godly. MarginaliaWhat commeth to kinges that refuse good counsell.Which thing many times turneth them to great plages & calamitie, as by plentiful exāples of kings destroyed, woūded, imprisoned, deposed, drowned, poysoned. &c. may wel to thēþt read histories appeare, but especially in this presēt example of Henry French king, the seconde of that name, is in this our age notoriously to be considered. Who being well warned before (as may seeme)would not yet surcease his cruell persecution agaynst the Lordes people, but rather was the more hardened in hart, and inflamed against them: in so muche that he sayd to Anne du Bourg, one of the high Court of Parliament in Paris, threatning hym, that he would see him burne with his owne eyes.

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MarginaliaHenry 2. French king wholy set to persecute the Chuch of Christ.Further, how his purpose was to extende his power and force likewise agaynst other places moe, in persecutyng the Gospell of Christe, and professours thereof, to the vttermost of his abilitie, I leaue it to the reporte of them, which in this matter know more then I here will vtter.

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MarginaliaGods mighty power agaynst his enemyes.But notwithstanding al these cracks and threatnings of the king (to see what the Lord can doe in making hygh kinges to stoupe) euen the same day when the king was in his most rage agaynst these good men, almightye God taking the cause in hand to fight for his Church, so turned þe matter, that he made the great enemy of hys, both with his mouth and with his hand, to worke his own destruction: with his mouth in commaunding, with his hand in geuing him the Lance into hys hand, which the same day gaue him his deathes wound: as by the sequele hereof in reading ye may vnderstand.

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¶ The stoke of Gods hand vpon Henry. 2. French king.

KIng Henry being in the Parliamēt house, which was kept at the Fryer Augustines at Paris, because þe Pallace was in preparing agaynst the mariage of hys daughter and his sister, and hauing heard the opinion in religiō of Anne du Bourg Counsaylour in the lawe, a man eloquent and learned, he caused the sayd Anne du Bourg and Loys du Faur Consaylours, to be taken prisoners by þe Constable of Fraunce, who apprehended them, and delyuered them into the handes of the Countye of Mongommery, the which caryed them to prison. Agaynst whom the king being wrathfull and angry, among other talke, sayd to the sayd Anne du Bourg: These eyes of mine shall see thee burne: And so on the 19 of Iune, Commission was geuen to the Iudges to make his Proces.

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During this meane while, great feastes and banquets were preparing in the Courte, for ioy and gladnes of the mariage that should be of the kinges daughter and sister, agaynst the last day of Iune saue one. MarginaliaHenry. 2. the French king sore set agaynst the poore Protestantes.So when the day & tyme aboue prefixed was come, the king employed all the morning in examining as wel the Presidentes, as Counsaylours of the sayde Parliament agaynst these prisoners and other theyr companions that were charged with the same doctrine, which being done, they went to dinner.

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The king after he had dyned, for that he was one of þe defendauntes at the Tourney, which was solemnly made in S. Anthonies Streate, neare to the prison where the foresayde Prisoners were committed, hee entred into the Lystes, and there in iusting: as the manner is, had broken many Staues right valiauntly as could be, runnyng as well agaynste the Countye of Montgommery, as other moe.

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Whereupon he was highly commended of the lookers on. And because he had done so valiauntly, and was thought nowe to haue done enough, hee was desired to cease with praise. MarginaliaHenry. 2. the French king in his triumph iusteth agaynst Montgommery.But he being the more inflamed with hearing of hys prayse, woulde needes runne an other course wyth Montgommery: who then refusing to runne agaynst the king, and kneling vpon his knees for pardon not to run: the king being egerly set, commanded him vpon his allegeance to runne, and (as some affirme) did also him selfe put the staffe in his hand, vnto whose handes he had committed the foresayd prisoners a little before. MarginaliaMontgommery agaynst his will commaunded to iuste agaynst the king.Montgommery thus being enforced whether he would or no, to run agaynst the king, addressed hymselfe after the best wyse to obey the kinges commaundement.

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Whereupon he and the king met together so stoutly þt in breaking theyr Speares, the king was striken with the counter blowe, so right in one of hys eyes, by reasonne that the visour of his Helmet so sodenly fell downe at the same instaunt, þt the shiuers entred into hys head: so that þe braynes was peryshed, & thereupon so festred, that no remedy could bee founde, although Phisitions and Surgeons were sent for from all places in the Realme, as also

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