Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
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2139 [2116]

Queene Mary. An Oration of M. Hales, to Queene Elizabeth.

MarginaliaAnno 1558.he was vnwilling to parte from his Deanerie and house of Westminster vnto the Monkes, whom in deede he fauoured not, although in other things a maynteiner of the Churche of Rome. Then being remoued from thence, was made Deane of Windsor, where he being apprehended in aduoutry, was by the same Cardinall put from all his spirituall liuinges. Wherefore he appealed to Rome, & flying out of the Realme, was taken by the waye, & clapt in the Tower of London, where he remayned vntill this time that Queene Elizabeth was proclaimed. At whiche time being deliuered, he fell sicke and dyed.

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Also I let passe the Coronation of this our moste noble and Christian Princesse, & the order of the same, which was the xv. day of Ianuary. Anno. 1559. To passe ouer also the tryumphant passage and honourable enterteinement of the sayd our most dread Souereigne, through the city of London, with such celebrity, prayers, wishes, welcomminges, cryes, tender wordes, Pageantes, Enterludes, declamations and verses set vp, as the like hath not commonly beene seene, arguing and declaring a wonderfull earnest affection of louinge hartes towarde theyr Soueraigne. Item, to pretermit in silence the letters gratulatory, sent to her Maiestie from diuers and sondry forreigne places, as from Zuricke, Geneua, Basill, Berne, Wittemberge, Argentine, Frankeforde. &c. These I saye with many other thinges to let passe, we will nowe (God willing) beginne with the disceptation or conference betwene the Popishe Bishops, and the learned men exiled in Germany, had at Westminster. After that first we haue inserted a certayne Oration of a worthy Gentleman called M. Iohn Hales, sent and deliuered to the sayd queene Elizabeth in the beginning of her reigne, the copy wherof is this.

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¶ An Oration of Iohn Hales, to the Queenes Maiestie, and deliuered to her Maiestye by a certayne Noble man, at her first entrance to her reigne. 
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John Hale's Oration

This oration was first written on Elizabeth's accession to the throne but it was not published by Foxe until the 1576 edition. The oration threatens Elizabeth with divine displeasure if she does not thoroughly purge the church of all 'Romish' abuses. Printed in 1576, after the vestments controversy and the admonition to parliament, this became a caustic indictment of Elizabeth. (See Thomas S. Freeman, 'Providence and Prescription: The Account of Elizabeth in Foxe's "Book of Martyrs"' in The Myth of Elizabeth, ed. Susan Doran and Thomas S. Freeman [Basingstoke: 2003], pp. 42-44).

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A copy of this oration is in Foxe's papers: BL, Harley MS 419, fos. 143r-148v.

¶ To the Noble Queene Elizabeth.

ALbeit there be innumerable giftes and benefites of almighty God, whereof euery one would wonderfully comfort any person, on whome it should please his goodnes to bestowe it: yet is none of othem either separate by it self, or ioyned with any other, or yet al mingled together, to be compared to this one: that it hath pleased God of his mercy to deliuer this Realme our Countrey from the tyranny of malicious Mary, & to commit it to the gouernemēt of vertuous Elizabeth. MarginaliaGreat benefites and treasures do nothing profit, where the vse of them cannot be inioyed.For if a man had all the treasure of Salomon, and might not be suffred to haue the vse therof: in what better case were he then miserable Tantalus, ouer whose head the apples continually hung, yet being hunger sterued, could he neuer touch them? If a man had as strong a body as had Sampson, and besides were as whole as a fish, as the prouerbe is, yet if he were kept in bandes, what should it auayle him? Yea rather if it bee well considered, it is a hurte to him, if continuance of tormentes and paynes may be a hurt.

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If a man had as manye children as had Gedeon the Iudge, and might not be so suffered to bring them vpp in the feare of God, & good knowledge & maners, had he not bene more happy to be without them, then to haue them? If a man had as much knowledge of God as had Saynt Paule, and durst not professe it openly with mouth, as he is commaunded, but for feare of death shoulde declare the contrary in deede, sclaunder the word of God, and deny Christ, which is forbidden, shoulde it not rather be a furtherance to his damnation, then otherwise?

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And to be short, if any one man had all these giftes together, or generally all the giftes of Fortune, the body, the minde, and of grace, yet if hee mought not haue the vse of them, what should they profite him? Veryly nothyng at all. MarginaliaFelicitye not in hauing but in vsing.For felicitye is not in hauing, but in vsing, not in possessing, but in occupying: not in knowledge, but in doing.

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But alas, our naturall Mother Englande, whiche hath bene counted to be the surest, the richest, and of late also the most godly Nation of the earth, hath bene these whole fiue yeares most violently by Tyrauntes forced to lacke the vse of all the giftes and benefites that GOD and nature had endued her. Her naturall and louynge children could not be suffered to enioy theyr right inheritance, whereby they might relieue and succour her or thē selues: but whatsoeuer they had, was eyther by opē force or by crafty dealing pulled from thē. And surely this had bene tollerable, if none other mischiefe had bene therwith intended.

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He is a gentle theefe (if theeues may bee counted gentle) that onely robbeth a man of his goodes, & refrayneth violent hands from his parson. For suche losse with labor and dilligence may be recouered. He may be called a mercifull murtherer, that onely killeth the aged Parentes, & vseth no force on the children.

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For nature hath made al men mortall, and that in like space, and to kill the parentes, is as it were but a preuention of a shorte tyme, if it were to the vttermost enioyed. MarginaliaWicked practises of most cruell Tyrantes.But these Tyrantes were more vngentle then common thieues, more empty of mercy, then common murtherers. For they were not onely not contented to haue the goods of the people, but they would haue it deliuered to them by the owners own handes, that it might be sayd to þe world they gaue it with the hart: and were not therwith pleased but they would haue theyr liues, that they should not bewray them, and yet herewith they were not satisfied, but they meant to root out the whole progenie and nation of English men, that none should be lefte to reuenge or crye out on theyr extremities, and to bring our Countrye into the Spanyardes dominion.

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It is an horrible crueltie for one brother to kill an other, muche more horrible for the children to lay violent & murthering handes on their parentes, but most horrible of all to murther the children in the sight of the parentes, or the parentes in the sight of their children, as these moste cruell tormenters haue done.

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But what do I stand in these thinges which haue some defence, because the Turkes perchaunce vse so to doe, and Ethnykes kill one an other, to make sacrifice of menne to theyr phantasticall Gods?

It was not enough for these vnnaturall English tormentours, Tyrantes, and false Christians, to be Lordes of the goodes, possessions, and bodyes of theyr brethren & Country men: but being verye Antichristes and enemies of Christes crosse, they would be Gods, and raygne in the consciences and soules of men. Euery man, woman, and childe, must deny Christ in word openly, abhorre Chryste in theyr deedes, sclaunder his Gospell with word & deed, worship and honour false gods as they would haue them and themselues did, and so geue body and soule to the deuill theyr maister, or secretly flee, or after inward torments to be burned openly. MarginaliaCruelty of late dayes, farre exceeding al crueltyes committed by the auncyent and famous tyrauntes in tyme past.O crueltie, cruelty, farre exceeding al cruelties committed by those ancient and famous tyrants and cruell murderers, Pharao, Herode, Caligula, Nero, Domitian, Maximine, Diocletian, Decius, whose names for theyr cruell persecution of the people of God, and their open tyranny practised on the people haue bene, be, & euer shalbe in perpetuall hatred, and theyr soules in continuall torment in hell. If any man would take vppon hym to set foorth particularly all the actes that haue bene done these full fiue yeares by this vnnaturall womā: No, no womā, but a monster, and the deuill of hel couered with the shape of a woman, as it is most necessary for the glorye of God, and the prophet of his churche, and this realme it shoulde be done, hee shall finde it a matter sufficient for a perfect great History, and not to be cōtayned in an Oration, to be vttered at one tyme by the voyce of man. But to comprehend the summe of all theyr wickednes in few wordes: behold, whatsoeuer malice in mischief, couetousnes in spoyl, crueltie in punishing, tiranny in destruction could do, that all this poore English nation these full fiue yeares eyther suffered already, or should haue suffered, had not the great mercy of God preuented it.

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And albeit there haue ben many that haue hazarded & lost theyr liues to shake of this moste rough brake (wherewith this Viragin rather then Virgin as she woulde bee called and taken) boasted her selfe to be sent of God, to ride and tame the people of Englande albeit there haue bene many that haue gone about to lose theyr brethren out of þe yoke of this moste miserable captiuitie: & albeit some haue proued to breake the bandes of this most cruell tyranny, yet coulde they neuer bring to passe, that they so earnestly labored, and so manfully attempted.

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And it is nothing to be wondered, let þe papistes boast therof what it pleaseth them. For almight God being a most indifferent gouernour, punishing euill, & rewarding good, could not of his iustice suffer his scourge so soone to be taken from this land, if he meaneth the salutation of the people, as most manifestly it appeareth he did. For hauing once geuen to this realme the geatest Iewell that myght be, that is, the free vse of his liuely worde, whiche if they had imbraced and folowed, would haue reformed al disorders & sinnes. Wherefore his wrath is kindled and prouoked, the people nothing regarded it, but eyther vtterly cōtemned it, or abused it, and many made it a cloke & colour to couer theyr mischief. So that if he should sodaynly haue withdrawne this plague, as tyrants & euill gouernors be

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