Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
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Griffith Leyson

(d. 1555)

Sheriff of Camarthenshire (1555). Dean of the Court of Arches. JP in Hereford and Shropshire (1555) [SP11/5, no. 6] [See Brown, Robert Ferrar, pp. 238-39, 246-47.]

Griffith Leyson escorted Robert Ferrar to his first hearing before Henry Morgan and surrendered custody of Ferrar to Morgan. 1563, p. 1098; 1570, p. 1723; 1576, p. 1471; 1583, p. 1554.

Griffith Leyson took the cattle from Ferrar's servant, Matthew Harbottle, but the cattle got sick and died. 1563, p. 1704, 1570, p. 2298, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2136.

He supervised Robert Ferrar's execution. 1563, p. 1100; 1570, p. 1724; 1576, p. 1472; 1583, p. 1555.

Leyson refused to allow Ferrar to speak at his execution. Leyson later became ill and unable to speak at the time of his death. 1570, p. 2298, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2136.

[NB: Leyson had been an inveterate opponent of Ferrar in Edward VI's reign; see Andrew J. Brown, Robert Ferrar (London, 1997), pp. 180, 208-9 and 238-39].

 
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Robert Ferrar

(d. 1555)

Bishop of St David's (1547 - 1554) and martyr (DNB).

Foxe gives a brief summary of Ferrar's career. Foxe calls him a double martyr because of the tribulations he endured in the reigns of both Edward VI and Mary. 1563, p. 1084; 1570, pp. 1121-22; 1576, p. 1470; 1583, p. 1544.

Articles accusing Ferrar of various offences were sent to the privy council in 1551 by Hugh Rawlins and Thomas Lee. 1563, pp. 1055-58; 1583, pp. 1544-46. [These articles were summarised in 1570, p. 1722; 1576, p. 1470.] Ferrar's answers to these articles are given in 1563, pp. 1088-93; 1583, pp. 1546-50). [These answers were summarised in 1570, p. 1722; 1576, p. 1470.] Ferrar's exceptions to the witnesses against him and 'matters justificatory' against him are given in 1563, pp. 1093-96; 1583, pp. 1550-52. [These are summarised in 1570, p. 1722; 1576, p. 1470.]

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Ferrar sent letters to the lord chancellor Thomas Goodrich defending himself and denouncing George Constantine and his other enemies. 1563, pp. 1096-98; 1570, pp. 1725-26; 1576, pp. 1472-80 [recte 1474]; 1583, pp. 1555-56.

Ferrar was imprisoned throughout the remainder of Edward VI's reign. 1563, p. 1098; 1583, p. 1553. [In 1570, p. 1722 and 1576, pp. 1470-71, Foxe states that Ferrar 'was deteined in custody under sureties' which is much closer to being correct. For proof that Ferrar was not imprisoned during Edward VI's reign, see Andrew J. Brown, Robert Ferrar (London, 1997), pp. 216-18.]

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Ferrar was imprisoned under Mary. 1563, p. 1732; 1570, pp. 1722-23; 1576, p. 1471; 1583, p. 1553.

On 6 May 1554, John Hooper sent Ferrar, John Philpot, John Bradford and Rowland Taylor a letter discussing a proposed disputation in Cambridge in which they would represent the protestants. 1570, p. 1687; 1576, p. 1440; 1583, p. 1513.

Ferrar was one of the signatories to a letter of 8 May 1554 protesting against the proposed disputation at Cambridge. The letter is printed in 1563, pp. 1001-3; 1570, p. 1639; 1576, pp. 1399-1400; 1583, pp. 1469-71.

Laurence Saunders sent a letter to Ferrar and his fellow prisoners, John Bradford, John Philpot and Rowland Taylor. 1570, pp. 1671-72; 1576, p. 1426; 1583, p. 1500.

In a letter William Tyms wrote to 'God's faithful servants', he named his fellow prisoners in the King's Bench as Robert Ferrar, Rowland Taylor, John Philpot, John Bradford and five other Sussex men. 1570, p. 2082, 1576, p. 1795, 1583, p. 1902.

Ferrar was brought before Stephen Gardiner at St Mary Ovary's on 30 January 1555. He was not examined and was sent back to prison (1570, p. 1655; 1576, p. 1412; 1583, p. 1483).

He was one of the authors of a petition to Philip and Mary asking that they allow protestant ministers to defend the Edwardian religious reforms in public debate (1570, p. 1656; 1576, p. 1413; 1583, p. 1483).

Ferrar was sent to Carmarthen on 14 February 1555 for trial and execution. 1563, p. 1732; 1570, pp. 1705 and 1722-23; 1576, pp. 1456 and 1471; 1583, pp. 1529 and 1553-54.

Ferrar's hearings and trial in Carmarthen, from 26 February to 11 March 1555, are recounted. 1563, pp. 1098-99; 1570, pp. 1723-24; 1576, pp. 1471-72; 1583, pp. 1554-55.

Ferrar was condemned and degraded on 13 March 1555. 1563, pp. 1099-1100; 1570, p. 1724; 1576, p. 1472; 1583, p. 1555.

Ferrar would have taken the sacrament if not for John Bradford's intervention. 1563, p. 1174, 1570, p. 1781, 1576, p. 1521, 1583, p. 1604.

The night before he was transferred to Newgate he had a dream about the chain for burning him. He was transferred on the Saturday night / Sunday morning and burned at Smithfield the following Monday. 1563, p. 1174, 1570, p. 1781, 1576, p. 1521, 1583, p. 1604.

Ferrar was executed in Carmarthen on 30 March 1555. 1563, p. 1100; 1570, p. 1724; 1576, p. 1472; 1583, p. 1555.

He was mentioned in Bradford's letter to Lady Fane. 1570, p. 1824, 1576, p. 1560, 1583, p. 1642.

Grindal wrote to Ridley from his exile in Frankfort, to which letter Ridley replied. Ridley mentioned that he knew that Ferrar had been martyred. 1570, pp. 1901-02, 1576, pp. 1628-30, 1583, pp. 1729-30.

Robert Ferrar was examined before the bishops of Durham and Worcester, Sir Richard Southwell and Gilbert Bourne. 1563, p. 1732, 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2136.

Dr Leyson refused to let him speak at the stake. 1563, p. 1736, 1570, p. 2296, 1576, p. 1990, 1583, p. 2136.

[Also referred to as 'Farrer' and as 'Robert Menaven'. 'Menaven' is an abbreviation for the Latin name of Ferrar's diocese of St David's; as is the custom, Ferrar's signature was in Latin with his first name and the name of his diocese.]

[Not related to Robert Farrer, haberdasher.]

 
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Thomas Hitton

(d. 1529)

Martyr. Of Martham, Norwich.

Thomas Swainesland, bailiff to William Warham (archbishop of Canterbury) desired Hitton's arrest for heresy. 1583, p. 2136.

In Hitton's first examination Warham questioned him about his acquistion of religious books overseas. 1583, p. 2136.

Hitton's second, third, fourth and fifth examinations were held before Warham. 1583, p. 2137.

Hitton was condemned by Warham and the bishop of Rochester. 1583, p. 2137.

 
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William Warham

(1450? - 1532)

Archbishop of Canterbury (1504 - 1532). (DNB)

Latimer was called to appear before William Warham (archbishop of Canterbury) and John Stokesley (bishop of London) on 29 January 1531. 1570, p. 1906, 1576, p. 1633, 1583, p. 1738.

Latimer wrote a letter to the archbishop of Canterbury. 1563, pp. 1333-34.

Foxe refers to the death of Warham, archbishop of Canterbury. 1563, p. 1471, 1570, p. 2035, 1576, p. 1754, 1583, pp. 1861-62.

Cranmer stated that he was ambassador in Germany when Warham died. 1563, p. 1482, 1570, p. 2058, 1576, p. 1774, 1583, p. 1880.

Thomas Swainesland, bailiff to William Warham (archbishop of Canterbury) desired Hitton's arrest for heresy. 1583, p. 2136.

In Hitton's first examination Warham questioned him about his acquistion of religious books overseas. 1583, p. 2136.

Hitton's second, third, fourth and fifth examinations took place before Warham. 1583, p. 2137.

Hitton was condemned by Warham and the bishop of Rochester. 1583, p. 2137.

 
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Dover
Douer
NGR: TR 320 414

One of the Cinq Ports, a borough and a market town, having separate jurisdiction; locally in the Lathe of St Augustine, eastern division of the County of Kent. 16 miles south east by south from Canterbury. Dover formerly consisted of the parishes of St James the Apostle, St John, St Martin the Greater, St Martin the Less, St Mary the Virgin, St Nicholas and St Peter - all subsequently merged into St James and St Mary. The living of St Mary is a perpetual curacy in the peculiar jurisdiction of the Archbishop of Canterbury, and in the patronage of the parishioners. The living of St James is a discharged rectory in the jurisdiction and patronage of the Archbishop

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Martham
Martham
NGR: TG 455 185

A parish in the western division of the hundred of Flegg, county of Norfolk. 6.75 miles north-west from Caistor. The living is a discharged vicarage in the peculiar jurisdiction and patronage of the Dean and Chapter of Norwich

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Rochester
NGR: TQ 730 686

An ancient city, having separate jurisdiction, locally in the lathe of Aylesford, county of Kent. 8.5 miles north from Maidstone. The city is the seat of the bishopric, and comprises the parishes of St Nicholas and St Margaret, both in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Rochester. St Margaret's is a vicarage in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter, and St Nicholas is a vicarage in the patronage of the bishop.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2159 [2136]

An Epistle of B. Hooper to the Conuocation house.

omnes omnino indoctos esse prædicatis, aut plane dementatos affirmatis. Vobis autem plusquam diuinam vendicatis prudentiam: nobis veró plusquám beluinam stoliditatem tribuitis. Iam quám facilé erit doctis indoctos, hominibus sanæ mentis insania percitos, ingenio & prudentia, flagrantibus stolidos & ignaros vincere: sacer parliamenti conuentus, nullo negocio intelliget. Ideo si omnino ob Christū & illius causæ gloriam quam nos defendimus, aut ob salutem nostram, vt vestra prudentia nos stultitiæ arguamur, vestraʠ doctrina & eruditione nos ignorantiæ accusemur, hoc facere non vultis: tamen vt publicé impietatis conuincamur, coram summo senatu, hoc præstate. Et si istis rationibus nihil moueamini: tamen vestra ipsorum causa certé postulat, vt palam eæ lites inter nos componantur, idʠ coram competenti iudice: né apud omnes pios malé audiat: & fortassis hac suspitione laboret, quasi lucem & publicum examen fugiat, né impietatis, & idololatriæ per verbum Dei depræhendatur. Et vos qui malam causam, imó pessimam, ferro & igne defenditis, non tam docti nec pij, vt omnino videri & haberi vultis, inueniamini: sed potius ignorantiæ & stultitiæ, quas nobis impingitis, redargumini. Non vos fugit quomodo publicé, palam, & in facie ac in præsentia omnium statuum huius regni, in summa curia parliamenti, veritas verbi Dei per fidos, doctos, & pios ministros, de vestra impia missa, gloriosé victoriam reportauit: quamuis per trecentos annos non solum locum & templum Dei occupauerit, verum etiam corda hominum (tanquám Deus) inhabitauerit. Sed quocunʠ titulo, nomine, honore, reuerentia, sanctitate, tempore, patrionis, vniuersalitate splenduit, vbi per sanctiss. Regē Edouardū sextū sanctiss. memoriæ, ad viuum lapidē lydeum verbi Dei examinari per proceres, heroes, ac doctos huius regni erat mandatum: statim euanuit, & nihil aliud appariut, quám spurcissimum & immundissimum idolū sub pallio, & nomine Dei impie contectum: æqua & iusta petimus, vt palam & publicé: lites inter nos componantur. Si igitur vestræ causæ & vobis ipsis non diffidatis, vná nobiscum apud sanctum senatum agere dignemini: vt coram illo, autoritate verbi dei, quis nostram veriorem partem defenderit, dignoscatur. Nullis enim legibus sanctis & iustis vnquám fuit permissum, vt vna pars litigans, de altera parte iudex constitueretur. Nam in omnibus controuersijs & causis deficilioribus (maxime in religione) medius aliquis, & neutra litigantium pars, in iudicem eligenda est. Nec Christus ipse (quamuis ipsa veritas) æterni patris filius, hanc potestatem & imperium iudicandi fibi vindecauit: quandocunʠ lites de eius doctrina inter illum & phariseos, vel quoscunʠ alios contigerunt. Sed semper ad legem appellauit, aduersariosʠ suos vt legis præscripto & sententia starent, rogauit: scrutamini (inquiens) scripturas. Nos etiam a vobis nihil aliud in nomine domini nostri Iesu Christi, supplices petimus & rogamus, nisi vt causa de qua inter nos litigatur, sententia & autoritate verbi dei decidatur ac finiatur. Et si per verbum dei fidem nostram parum candidam & piam, ostendere valetis: porregemus vobis herbam, dabimusʠ dextras. Nec in impios Arrianos pij & sancti, patres, hanc iudicandi potestatē sibi assumpserunt: sed adfuit disputationi pius princeps Constantinus imperator, qui rationes partium litigantium, diligenter perpendit: & sententiam atʠ iudicium causæ, soli autoritati verbi dei detulit. Quid hoc est igitur? quo iure contenditis? vultis & nostri & causæ nostræ, testes, accusatores & iudices esse? nos tantum legem & euangelium Dei in causa religionis, iudicē competentem agnoscimus: illius iudicio stet vel cadat nostra causa. Tantum (iterumatʠ. iterum) petimus, vt coram competēti iudice detur nobis qui vincula & carceres sustinemus, amicū Christianumʠ auditorium: vim haud dubitamus, quin nostras rationes, & argumenta autoritate verbi diuini sum9 stabilituri, ac vestra plané subuerturi. Hactenus præiudicio iniusté grauamur: nec mirum, cum vna pars litigantium iudex alterius partis constituatur. Quapropter ad verbum dei, tanquam vnicum & solum competentem in causa religionis, iudicem appellamus. Si præter & contra hanc legem dei, falsa & impia (vt cœpistis) vi & dolo promouere non desistetis, sed fratres vestros truculenter persequendo pergetis: nos in tantis periculis constituti, ad misericordiam dei confugiemus, qui solus & possit & velit nos á vestris erroribus, incolumes & saluos conseruare. Præterea, vt olim aliqui ex nobis, pro salute & incolumitate aliquot vestrum, apud magistratum ciuilem intercessimus: sic & nunc pro omnium vestrum salute in Christo Iesu, apud patrem cœlestem intercedere non desistemus, vt tandem ad meliorem & sinceriorem mentem reuersi, vnicum Christum Iesum quem præcinuerunt prophetæ, prædicauerunt Apostoli, quemʠ omnes pij agnoscūt (iam quoad humanitatem, sedentem ad dextram patris in cœlis amplectamini, & exosculemini: repudiato conficto, & ementito illo Christo ex pane confecto: quem nō solum iuuenes, virgines, & senes, verum etiam oues & boues, pecoraʠ campi, volucres cœli & pisces maris panem agnoscunt ac sentiunt, & non deum. Deistite rogamus igitur enixé vlterius oculos piorum perstringere. Verus enim Christus quatenus homo, iam amplius sursum ac deorsum per manus sacerdotū, agitari & immolari nō potest. Infernum vicit, peccata vestra in cruce perlitauit, mortem destruxit, & iam astra tenet: quem olim videbitis venientem in nu-

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bibus cœli cum potestate magna & gloria, sempiternisʠ pœnis vos plangetis, nisi hoc pœnitētiam falsæ & impiæ vestræ doctrinæ egeritis. Si deus autem pro sua inexhausta bonitate & clemētia, per verbum suum lites istas inter nos componi dignetur: non dubito quin oculos vestros ita sit aperturus, vt quám horribiliter, & impié dei ac hominum testimonio & scriptis abuti videatis. Sed si furioso, & excandescenti spiritu, vestras partes citra autoritatem verbi dei, defēdere velitis: actum est omnino de vestra æterna salute: quod dominus propter filiū suum vnicū auertat. Cogitate etiā apud vos ipsos an hoc sit piorū ministrorū ecclesiæ officiū, vi, metu, & pauore corda hominū in vestras partes cōpellere? Profectô Christu9 nō ignē, non gladiū, nō carceres, nō vincula, nō violentiā, nō confiscationē, bonorū, nō regineæ maiestatis terrorē, media organa constituit, quibus veritas sui verbi mundo promulgaretur: sed miti ac diligenti prædicatione euāgelij sui, mundū ab errore & idololatria conuerti præcepit. Vos nō Christi sed Antichristi armis vtimini, quibus populū inuitum ad vestra sacra cōpellitis: & non volentē, & instructū verbo dei trahitis. Sed quám malus custos perpetuitatis sit timor, non ignoratis. Certé qui timet nisi dei spiritu sēper reuocetur, odit. Tradite igitur saluberrima præcepta legis & euangelij populo dei vt pro Christi ministris per verbum Christi, ab omnibus agnoscamini. Ideó enim ministri ecclesiæ Christi estis constituti, vt tantum Christi doctrinam populum dei doceretis: & non vt nouā, & á Christo alienam obtruderetis. Quæ iam vos in ecclesia agitis, si coram æquoiudice, amicam ac Christianam disputationé, non recusaueritis: ex verbo dei ostendemus, vel á lege Mosaica mutuata: vel per Antichristum, & pseudoministros in ecclesiā fuisse introducta vt hoc breui tractatu exelsæ parliamenti curiæ facilé constabit. Scio inter vos esse tam turgido, & iniquo spiritu præditos, qui putant nos tantū inanis gloriæ, superbiæ, arrogantiæ, & famæ nostræ fumo duci, & ideo velle potius semper malé currere: qúam admoniti de errore bené recurrere. Sed hoc Deus nouit, quod tantum illius gloriam, nostramʠ salutem in Christo quærim9 dicant aduersarij quid velint. Meminerint autē nostri aduersarij & cogitēt: quāqúam apud illos nec pro doctis, nec pijs hominib9 habeamur (& haud dubié nos ipsos omnis impietatis & peccati apud deum quotidié accusam9) tamē homines sumus ratione prediti. Et quis (nisi insanus) iactura & amissione omniū bonorū suorum, vxoris, liberorum, libertatis & vitæ: redimeret, famæ aut inanis gloriæ titulum? Profecto tanti pœnitere (vt dicitur) non emerimus. Igitur illius verbi veritatem nostris bonis omnibus ac vitæ ipsi præterimus: Et si centies (Deo nos adiuuante) moriendum nobis fuerit: ad idololatriam & impium cultū Dei, quæ Dei misericordia hactenus reliquimus, non reuertemur. Domini sumus siué viuimus siue morimur: eius igitur voluntas in vobis & in nobis, cum misericordia fiat, Amen.

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Vestræ salutis in Christo studio-
sisimus. Ioh. Hoperus.

A note of Bish. Farrer. 
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It is true that Griffith Leyson died on 24 June 1555; whether the rest of Foxe's story is true or not is unknown. This story was reprinted from the appendix to the 1563 edition.

MarginaliaReferre this to the page 1555.DOctour Leison, doctor of lawe, a Ciuilian, a Iustice of peace, the same who is mentioned, page. 1555. woulde not suffer bishop Farrer (when he was at the stake to bee burnt) to speake his mynd, and about halfe a yeare after, the said Doc. Leison died, and when he would haue spoke himselfe, he could not.

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The trouble and examination of Thomas Hitton Martyr, with his examinations, answers, condemnation and Martyrdome, An. Dom. 1529. the 20 of February.

MarginaliaReade before page. 997. col. 2. The story and Martyrdome of Thomas Hitton.THomas Hitton of Martham in the Diocesse of Norwich, an honest poore man and religious, euer fearyng God from his youth and louyng his worde. When persecution for the same word in the dayes of king Henry the 8. grew to bee somewhat hote, tooke his iourney toward Rochester in Kent, intendyng to haue gone to Douer, & so to haue crossed the seas into Fraunce and other countries for a tyme, where reposing himself a while, he might be free from the heat of persecution. As he was goyng on his intēded iourny, one Thomas Swainesland, Baily to MarginaliaWilliam Warham Archbishop of Canterbury.William Warrham Archbish. of Canterbury, meting hym by the way, and suspecting him to be (as they called them) an heretike, caused him to be staied, MarginaliaThe examination of Thomas Hitton before the Archbishop.and brought before the said William Archb. of Cant. his maister, who demanded of him from whence he came, and whether he intended to haue gone, if he had not bene intercepted. The sayd Tho. answered that he came out of the Dioces of Norwich, and purposed to haue gone beyond the seas, if God had so permitted. Then the Bishop asked him if he had euer bene beyond the seas before, and what bookes he had brought ouer. He answered that he had bene once beyond the seas before, and had brought certaine bookes with hym from thence, namely, two new Testaments, and one Primer in English. The Bishop asked him to whome hee gaue the

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sayde
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