Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCattley Pratt ReferencesLatin/Greek TranslationsCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Anthony Hussey

(d. 1560)

Cranmer's chief registrar. Under Mary registrar in the Court of Arches and of the chapter of St Paul's Cathedral. Governor of the Muscovy Company. Governor of the English merchants in Antwerp. [ See MacCulloch, Cranmer, p. 608 and J. G. Nichols, Narratives, p. 216.]

John Story commanded Thomas Green be brought to Walbrook before the commissioners. He was eventually sent before Hussey. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2051.

Thomas Green told Hussey that John Bean, an apprentice to Tottle, had received a copy of a book called 'Antichrist' from him. 1563, p. 1688, 1570, p. 2263, 1576, p. 1954, 1583, p. 2051.

Elizabeth Young's first examination took place before Hussey. 1570, pp. 2268-69, 1576, pp. 1958-59, 1583, pp. 2065-66.

 
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John Alcock

(d. 1555)

Shearman. Of Hadleigh, Suffolk [although not a native]. [See John Craig, Reformation, Politics and Polemics, The Growth of Protestantism in East Anglian Market Towns 1500-1610 (Aldershot, 2001), p. 173.]

After Richard Yeoman was driven away from Hadleigh, Alcock used to read a chapter and say the litany in Hadleigh church. Arrested, he was taken to London and died in Newgate prison. 1563, p. 1067; 1570, p. 1694; 1576, p. 1445; 1583, p. 1520.

John Alcock did not remove his cap during the procession, for which action Newall called for the constable to arrest Alcock. 1563, p. 1563, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Robert Rolfe was an honest constable, and asked Newall why he was so enraged by Alcock. 1563, p. 1563, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Newall insisted that Rolfe place Alcock in the stocks. Rolfe said that he would bail him and not to put him in the stocks. 1563, p. 1563, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Rolfe later met with Alcock and told him that he was sorry for him. 1563, p. 1563, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Rolfe feared that Newall would be cruel to Alcock because of Newall's dislike of Rolfe. 1563, p. 1563, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Rolfe took Alcock to appear before Newall who committed him to prison. 1563, p. 1563, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Alcock was imprisoned in squalid conditions and died there. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

His body was cast out and buried in a dunghill. 1563, p. 1564, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

His first epistle. 1563, p. 1664, 1583, p. 2146.His second epistle. 1563, pp. 1664-66, 1583, p. 2147.

[Although he was not burned, note that Foxe none the less refers to him as a 'martyr'.]

[NB: Foxe states that a John Awcocke died in prison on 2 April 1555 and was buried in the fields. 1563, p. 1117; 1570, p. 1731; 1576, p. 1478; 1583, p. 1561].

[Also referred to as John Awcocke]

 
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John Nowell

(d. by May 1567)

Rector of Hadleigh (1554 - 1560), dean of Bocking (1556 - 1564), rector of Great Massingham, Norfolk (1556 - 1567) (Emden, 1501-1540).

John Nowell succeeded Rowland Taylor as rector of Hadleigh. Foxe contrasts him unfavorably with his predecessor. 1563, p. 1070; 1570, p. 1696; 1576, p. 1448; 1583, p. 1521.

[A copy of a sermon preached by Nowell in Hadleigh on 10 February 1555, the day after Rowland Taylor's execution, survives in Foxe's papers (BL, Harley MS 425, fols. 119r-120r). Nowell denounced Taylor for having 'dyed in a damnable case'. This sermon was not printed by Foxe, but a long extract from it is in Strype, Cranmer, pp. 604-6].

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John Alcock did not remove his cap during the procession, for which action Nowall called for the constable to arrest Alcock. 1563, p. 1563, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Robert Rolfe was an honest constable and asked Nowall why he was so enraged by John Alcock. 1563, p. 1563, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Nowall insisted that Rolfe place Alcock in the stocks. Rolfe said that he would bail him and so not put him in the stocks. 1563, p. 1563, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Rolfe later met with Alcock and told him that he was sorry for him. 1563, p. 1563, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Rolfe feared that Newall would be cruel to Alcock because of Newall's dislike of Rolfe. 1563, p. 1563, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Rolfe took Alcock to appear before Newall who committed him to ward. 1563, p. 1563, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

[Foxe calls him 'Maister Neweall'.]

 
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Maurice Griffith

(d. 1558)

BD (1532). Bishop of Rochester (1554 - 1558). [DNB]

Maurice Griffith was created bishop of Rochester (1570, p. 1636; 1576, p. 1396; 1583, p. 1487).

Bradford, in a letter to John Treves, referred to a contention between the master of Katherines Hall and the bishop of Rochester, who was master of Pembroke Hall, as to which should have Bradford as a fellow. 1583, p. 1664.

Rochester condemned Christopher Wade and Nicholas Halle 31 June 1555, and they were burned in July 1555. 1570, p. 1859, 1576, p. 1591, 1583, p. 1678.

Margaret Polley was accused and brought before Maurice Griffith, bishop of Rochester. 1570, pp. 1859-60, 1576, pp. 1591-92, 1583, p. 1679.

Nicholas Hall was condemned by Maurice Griffith, bishop of Rochester, 31 June 1555, and burned about 19 July 1555. 1570, p. 1859, 1576, p. 1591, 1583, p. 1678.

Philpot's fifth examination was before Bonner, Rochester, Coventry, St Asaph, as well as Story, Curtop, Saverson, Pendleton and others. 1563, pp. 1398-1405, 1570, pp. 1968-72, 1576, pp. 1695-98, 1583, pp. 1803-05.

Philpot stated that Cheyney and Rochester could testify to what he had said under his examination. 1563, pp. 1405-12, 1570, pp. 1972-78, 1576, pp. 1698-1702, 1583, pp. 1805-10.

Philpot's seventh examination on 19 November 1555 was before Bonner, Rochester, the chancellor of Lichfield, Chadsey and John Dee. 1563, pp. 1412-16, 1570, pp. 1978-80, 1576, pp. 1702-05, 1583, pp. 1810-12.

Joan Beach and John Harpole were examined by Maurice Griffith, bishop of Rochester. 1570, p. 2086, 1576, p. 1800, 1583, p. 1906.

Stephen Gratwick was condemned by the bishop of Winchester and the bishop of Rochester. 1570, p. 2161, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1976.

Richard Woodman's fourth examination took place before White (Winchester), Griffith (Rochester), a certain doctor and others on 25 May 1557. 1563, pp. 1596-99, 1570, pp. 2188-90, 1576, pp. 1889-90, 1583, pp. 1997-99.

Ralph Allerton was examined on 19 May before the bishop of Rochester, Chichester and others. 1563, p. 1626, 1570, p. 2212, 1576, p. 1908, 1583, p. 2016.

William Wood offered sanctuary in his house to Walter Appleby and his wife, but within a fortnight the bishop of Rochester sent his chief man to bring them to Rochester, where they were imprisoned and later burned. 1583, p. 2145.

Maurice Griffith died after Queen Mary. 1563, p. 1707, 1570, p. 2301, 1576, p. 1992.

 
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Petronil Appleby

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Wife of Walter Appleby. Of Maidstone

William Wood offered sanctuary in his house to Walter Appleby and his wife, but within a fortnight the bishop of Rochester sent his chief man to bring them to Rochester, where they were imprisoned. 1583, p. 2145.

Petronil Appleby was burned with her husband and five others at Maidstone on 18 June 1557. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1979.

 
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Ralph Crowch

William Wood offered sanctuary in his house to Walter Appleby and his wife, but within a fortnight the bishop of Rochester sent his chief man, Ralph Crowch, to bring them to Rochester, where they were imprisoned and then burned on 18 June 1557. 1583, p. 2145.

Crowch came for William Wood, but took his neighbour instead. 1583, p. 2145.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Richard Yeoman

(1497? - 1557)

Minister. Martyr. Of Hadleigh, Suffolk. [See John Craig, Reformation, Politics and Polemics: The Growth of Protestantism in East Anglian Market Towns 1500-1610 (Aldershot, 2001), pp. 163, 172, 173.]

Richard Yeoman was Rowland Taylor's curate. When Taylor departed, he left Yeoman in charge. But Yeoman was driven away and later burned at Norwich. 1563, p. 1067; 1570, p. 1699; 1576, p. 1447; 1583, p. 1520.

Richard Yeoman took over Taylor's cure at the departure of Taylor. 1563, p. 1661, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1938, 1583, p. 2045.

As soon as Master Newall took over the benefice he set a catholic curate in Richard Yeoman's place. 1563, p. 1697, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1938, 1583, p. 2045.

Yeoman fled to Kent, where he sustained himself and his wife and children by selling laces, pins and points from village to village. 1563, p. 1697, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1938, 1583, p. 2045.

Master Moyle, justice of Kent, set Richard Yeoman in the stocks at Fulham. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1938, 1583, p. 2046.

Yeoman returned to Hadleigh and resided secretly in the Guildhall. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1938, 1583, p. 2046.

Yeoman's wife begged bread and meat for her family, while her husband spent his time devoutly and also carding wool for his wife to spin. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1938, 1583, p. 2046.

Newall found out where Yeoman was hiding and took the bailiff's deputies and servants to seize him. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1938, 1583, p. 2046.

Richard Yeoman was set in the stocks after his capture. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1938, 1583, p. 2046.

Yeoman met with John Dale in the cage, who had been there for three or four days and remained there until Sir Henry Doyle, a justice, came to Hadleigh. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Newall urged Doyle to take Dale and Yeoman to prison. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Doyle believed that Dale and Yeoman should not be punished for more than a day or two. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Doyle believed that Dale should be released immediately. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Doyle submitted to Newall's requests eventually and signed the writ for Dale and Yeoman to be taken to Bury jail. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2244, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

After Dale, a weaver, died, Yeoman was removed to Norwich prison. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

Yeoman was burned at Norwich on 10 July 1557. He was tormented at the stake. 1563, p. 1698, 1570, p. 2245, 1576, p. 1939, 1583, p. 2046.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Walter Appleby

(d. 1557)

Martyr. Of Maidstone

William Wood offered sanctuary in his house to Walter Appleby and his wife, but within a fortnight the bishop of Rochester sent his chief man to bring them to Rochester, where they were imprisoned. 1583, p. 2145.

Walter Appleby was burned with his wife and five others at Maidstone on 18 June 1557. 1570, p. 2167, 1576, p. 1872, 1583, p. 1979.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Wood

Baker. Of Stroud, Kent.

William Wood was examined by Chedsey, Kenall (chancellor of Rochester) and Robinson (scribe) on 19 October 1554 in St Nicholas's church, Rochester. 1570, p. 2281, 1576, pp. 1969-70, 1583, p. 2077.

He was a witness against Richard Gibson. 1563, p. 1642.

Foxe includes Wood's own record of his examination. 1563, p. 1642, 1570, p. 2223, 1576, p. 1919, 1583, p. 2077.

Wood wrote a letter relating his 'miraculous' escapes from danger, dated 25 July 1583. 1583, p. 2145.

William Wood offered sanctuary in his house to Walter Appleby and his wife, but within a fortnight the bishop of Rochester sent his chief man to bring them to Rochester, where they were imprisoned and later burned. 1583, p. 2145.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Cobham
Cobham
NGR: TQ 670 684

A parish, formerly a market town, in the hundred of Shamwell, lathe of Aylesford, county of Kent, 5 miles west from Rochester. The living is a vicarage not in charge in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Rochester

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Hadleigh
Hadley
NGR: TM 026 425

A parish in the hundred of Cosford, county of Suffolk. 10.5 miles west by south from Ipswich. The living is a rectory within the exempt Deanery of Bocking, in the peculiar jurisdiction and patronage of the Archbishop of Canterbury.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Maidstone
Maidstone, Maydstone
NGR: TQ 760 555

A borough and parish, having separate jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Maidstone, lathe of Aylesford, county of Kent, of which it is the county town. 8 miles south from Rochester. The living is a perpetual curacy in the peculiar jurisdiction and patronage of the Archbishop of Canterbury

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Rochester
NGR: TQ 730 686

An ancient city, having separate jurisdiction, locally in the lathe of Aylesford, county of Kent. 8.5 miles north from Maidstone. The city is the seat of the bishopric, and comprises the parishes of St Nicholas and St Margaret, both in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Rochester. St Margaret's is a vicarage in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter, and St Nicholas is a vicarage in the patronage of the bishop.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Strood
Strowd, Strowde
NGR: TQ 733 692

A parish partly within the jurisdiction of the borough of Rochester, and partly in the hundred of Skamwell, lathe of Aylesford, county of Kent. Half-mile north-west from Rochester. The living is a perpetual curacy in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Rochester

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Person and Place Index  *  Close
Tuddenham
Tuddenham
NGR: TL 738 714

A parish in the hundred of Lackford, county of Suffolk. 3 miles south-east by south from Mildenhall. The living is a rectory in the Archdeaconry of Sudbury, diocese of Norwich.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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2169 [2146]

Notes of William Wood and Iohn Alcocke.

was cited to come before Mayster Hussey the Commissary, who had it not bene for that he made meanes vnto the sayd Hussey before) woulde haue sent him to prison, and bound him in recognisaunce to seeke her out. But he more easily escaped theyr handes by frendship, as before I haue sayd.

Now when D. Mallet heard of her death, M. Crokhay, and one Robert Hemminges, Bailiefe of S. Katherins, being before him for þe burying of her, he sayd plainely, she should be buried nigh to some high way, & a marke set vp, in token that an hereticke was buryed there. Then the sayd Hemminges tolde him, the hogges would scrape her vp, which were not decent nor best, and M. Crokhay intreated she might be buryed in his Garden, whiche at length he graunted, and willed the sayde Hemminges to see it done, and that he should be sure he buryed her there in deede.

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After, when the corpes was brought to the sayd Garden, the sayd Robert Hemminges the Bailife would needes see it opened, which when the couer was taken of, the wife of the sayd Hemmings put her hand wtin the sheete, & felt the hayre of the sayde dead corpes, saying: now will I iustify that she is here, and so she did, telling Mallet that those her handes did feele her: this is the effect of thys Story.

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Now since the comming in of Queene Elizabeth the sayd D. Mallet came to the sayd M. Crokhay and asked him forgeuenes, alleadging this verse of the Poet.

¶ Amantium iræ amoris redintegratio est. 

Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Terence
Foxe text Latin

Amantium irae amoris integratio est

Foxe text translation

Not translated.

Translation (Wade 2003)

The tiffs of lovers is the renewal of love

Actual text of Terence, Andria, Act 3, Scene 3, Line 25 (Perseus search)

Amantium irae amoris integratio est

[Accurate citation]

The Lord geue him repentaunce, and grace to seeke perfect frendwip with him, if it be his blessed will. Amen.

¶ A note of William Woode.

ACcording as I haue sent vnto you the true recorde of my examination before the Doctors aboue mētioned, so I thougt it not inconuenient to send you likewise certayne notes of my other two deliueraunces MarginaliaTwo notable deliuerances of William Woodman.in Queene Maryes time, and this I doe not as God knoweth to get any prayse to my selfe or to reproche any other, but that God may be glorified in his workes, and that our brethrē may knowe that though there be, many times, but little help in earth, yet that there is more in heauen: About a month after my examination, there was one Apleby and hys wife, that were persecuted from Maydstone in Kent came to my house in Strowde & desired me that he might haue a place in my house for him and his wife for a tyme, because persecution was so hote, that hee coulde no longer stay there, and I at his instaunce let him haue a place with me, but within a fortnight after the Papists espyed him and complayned of him to the Bishop of Rochester, and the bishop sent his chiefe man called Raphe Crowch, and he caryed him to Rochester before the Byshop & the sayd Apleby stood in the defence of the trueth boldly, and the Bishoppe sent both hym and his wife to the Iayle of Maidstone, and there they were burned for the Testimony of the Gospell of God. And the Friday fortnight after I was in the market at Rochester talking with an other man, and the sayde Raphe Crowch was sent for me and he comming within a stones cast of me where I was talking with my neighbour George Smally, and one William Stanley a papist dwelling also in Strowde, met with the sayd Crowch, and they two talked together a whyle, and I doubted that they talked of me because many times in theyr talke they looked on me, and then the said Raphe Crowch went ouer the street to an other officer or constable whiche knewe not me, and sent the sayde Constable for me, and comming for me, knowing my neyghbour, George Smally tooke him in the steade of me, and caryed him to the Byshop, and when he came before hym the Byshop sayd to the officers this is not he knaue, thys is not he knaue, and the bishop checked the Mayor & hys officers and sayd that they mocked him, because he caryed the other man for me, suche was the mighty prouidence of God to defend me, and the Mayor the same night sent 40. Billes and menne with other weapons to beset my house to take me, but the Lord kept me from them and deliuered me out of theyr handes, to hym be glory therefore, Amen.

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The third time that the Lorde deliuered me was on Easter day next after, I had bene at London all the Lent and on Easter euen at night I came home to Strowde to to my wife, and a childe of three yeares olde tolde one of the neighbours that her father was come home. And on Easter day after theyr popishe euensong was done, came Maister Read Thomas Crowch brother to the abouesaid Raphe Crowch, William Stanley, Thomas Bettes, Li-

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onell Newman and Roger Braunche, with a 60. people or there aboutes and searched my house very straightly for me, but as Gods prouidence was, there was mault a drying vppon the Kell, and they searched so narrowly for me that I was glad to heaue vp a corner of þe hayre wheron the mault lay, and went into the Kell hole, and there stood till they were gone, and so I escaped from them, but within an houre after there came a woman to my wyfe to borrow a brush, and spyed me thorough the key hole of a dore, and she carying tidinges abroad. Immediately came a great company of men and beset my house rounde about, and I said to my wife, you see that these foure men seeke for my life, that is, Maister Read, Thomas Crowch William Stanley, and Thomas Bettes, for I doe thinke that none of the rest will lay handes on me, and therefore I pray thee wife follow these 4. men, and talke lowde to them þt I may heare & so escape, & if they search on þe backe side I may auoyd on þe street side, & be of good comfort for our liues are in Gods hand, and though there be little helpe here on earth, yet there is help enough from heauen, and when these men were searching on the backside, I went into the streete, among as I gesse an 100. people, and none of them layd handes on me, neyther sayde they anye thing to me, so I went out of the towne, & lay there at an honest mans house at the parish of Cobham that night.

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And at that same time also two of my neighbours, honest men and of good wealth, the one called Iohn Pem.met a fisherman, the other named Iohn Bayly a glouer, because they came not to theyr popish Church to buy none of their Idolatrous wares, were complayned of to the Iustices, who did binde them to aunswere for theyr fayth before the Iudges at the ascises whiche were holden at midsommer after as I remember at Rochester in þe pallace yard, and there was at that tyme a sayle cloth of a ship tyed to the top of the Byshops Pallace wall to keep away the sonne from the Iudges because it was hote, and the winde blew and shooke the sayle, so that when these two men were called to be examined, and when they shoulde haue aunswered, there fell from the top of the wall, 3. or 4. great stones vpon the Iudges neckes, so that some of thē whiche sate on the Benche were sore hurt and maymed so that they arose sodenly all amased and departed, and the two men were deliuered.

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From Tuddenham in Suff. the 25. day of Iuly. 1583.

Per me Gulielmum Wood, Vica-
rium de Tuddenham.

The history of Iohn Alcocke 
Commentary  *  Close

This brief account, and two letters of John Alcock, were reprinted from the 1563 edition (1563, pp. 1663-67).

THis Iohn Alcocke or Aucock, of whome mention is made before pag. 1561. was a very faythfull and honest man, by his occupation a woad setter,  

Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 731, line 3

Alcock is before called "a Shearman."

singularly wel learned in þe holy scriptures, and in all his conuersation a iust and righteous man, that feared God, and studyed to do in deed that thing that he had learned in the scriptures. Nowe after that sir Richard Yeaman was driuen away, and the people on sondayes and other dayes came to the Church, and had no man to teach them any thinge (for as yet person Newall was not come to Hadley 
Cattley Pratt  *  Close
Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 731, fn 1

Hadleigh in Suffolk. - ED.

to dwel, nor had gotten any Curate. Besides that, the lawes made by king Edward were in force, and the latin mumblinges not yet receaued euery where.) Iohn Alcocke therefore tooke the english booke vsed by king Edward, exhorting the people to pray with him, and so red certain prayers in english before them: and moreouer hee gaue them godly lessons and exhortations out of the chapters that he red vnto them. For this, the Bishoppe of Winchester Steuen Gardiner sent for him, cast him into Newgate at London where after many examinations and troubles, for that he woulde not submitte himselfe to aske forgeuenesse of the Pope, and to be reconciled to the romish religion, he was cast into the lower doungeon, where with euill keeping, and sicknesse of the house he dyed in prison. Thus dyed he a martyr of Christes veritie, whiche hee hartely loued and constantly confessed, and receaued the garlande of a well foughten battell at the hand of the Lorde. His body was cast out and buryed in a dounghill, for the Papists would in all thinges be like themselues: therfore would they not so much as suffer the dead bodyes to haue honest and conuenient sepulture.

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He wrote two Epistles to Hadley, whiche follow here.

The first Epistle of Iohn Alcocke. 
Commentary  *  Close

BL, Lansdowne MS 389, fos. 301v-302v is a copy of this epistle.

MarginaliaGal. 1.GRace be with you, and peace from the father and our Lord Iesus Christ, which gaue himselfe for our sinnes, that he might deliuer vs from this present euill world, ac-

cording
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