Thematic Divisions in Book 12
1. Exhumations of Bucer and Phagius along with Peter Martyr's Wife2. Pole's Visitation Articles for Kent3. Ten Martyrs Burnt at Canterbury4. The 'Bloody Commission'5. Twenty-two Prisoners from Colchester6. Five Burnt at Smithfield7. Stephen Gratwick and others8. Edmund Allen and other martyrs9. Edmund Allen10. Alice Benden and other martyrs11. Examinations of Matthew Plaise12. Richard Woodman and nine other martyrs13. Ambrose14. Richard Lush15. The Martyrdom of Simon Miller and Elizabeth Cooper16. Rose Allin and nine other Colchester Martyrs17. John Thurston18. George Eagles19. Richard Crashfield20. Fryer and George Eagles' sister21. Joyce Lewes22. Rafe Allerton and others23. Agnes Bongeor and Margaret Thurston24. John Kurde25. John Noyes26. Cicelye Ormes27. Persecution at Lichfield28. Persecution at Chichester29. Thomas Spurdance30. Hallingdale, Sparrow and Gibson31. John Rough and Margaret Mearing32. Cuthbert Simson33. William Nicholl34. Seaman, Carman and Hudson35. Three at Colchester36. A Royal Proclamation37. Roger Holland and other Islington martyrs38. Stephen Cotton and other martyrs39. Scourging of Thomas Hinshaw40. Scourging of John Milles41. Richard Yeoman42. John Alcocke43. Thomas Benbridge44. Four at St Edmondsbury45. Alexander Gouch and Alice Driver46. Three at Bury47. A Poor Woman of Exeter48. The Final Five Martyrs49. John Hunt and Richard White50. John Fetty51. Nicholas Burton52. John Fronton53. Another Martyrdom in Spain54. Baker and Burgate55. Burges and Hoker56. The Scourged: Introduction57. Richard Wilmot and Thomas Fairfax58. Thomas Greene59. Bartlett Greene and Cotton60. Steven Cotton's Letter61. James Harris62. Robert Williams63. Bonner's Beating of Boys64. A Beggar of Salisbury65. Providences: Introduction66. The Miraculously Preserved67. William Living68. Edward Grew69. William Browne70. Elizabeth Young71. Elizabeth Lawson72. Christenmas and Wattes73. John Glover74. Dabney75. Alexander Wimshurst76. Bosom's wife77. Lady Knevet78. John Davis79. Mistress Roberts80. Anne Lacy81. Crosman's wife82. Congregation at Stoke in Suffolk83. Congregation of London84. Englishmen at Calais85. Edward Benet86. Jeffrey Hurst87. William Wood88. Simon Grinaeus89. The Duchess of Suffolk90. Thomas Horton 91. Thomas Sprat92. John Cornet93. Thomas Bryce94. Gertrude Crockhey95. William Mauldon96. Robert Horneby97. Mistress Sandes98. Thomas Rose99. Troubles of Sandes100. Complaint against the Ipswich Gospellers101. Tome 6 Life and Preservation of the Lady Elizabeth102. The Unprosperous Queen Mary103. Punishments of Persecutors104. Foreign Examples105. A Letter to Henry II of France106. The Death of Henry II and others107. Justice Nine-Holes108. John Whiteman109. Admonition to the Reader110. Hales' Oration111. The Westminster Conference112. Appendix notes113. Ridley's Treatise114. Back to the Appendix notes115. Thomas Hitton116. John Melvyn's Letter117. Alcocke's Epistles118. Cautions to the Reader119. Those Burnt at Bristol: extra material120. Priest's Wife of Exeter121. Snel122. Laremouth123. William Hunter's Letter124. Doctor Story125. The French Massacre
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Armand de Gontaut
 
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Armand de Gontaut

Baron de Biron (Bironius)

(1524? - 1592)

French noble from the Périgord, and a leading diplomatic and military authority at the French court during the civil wars.

Armand de Gontaut was educated in the service of the king of Navarre and saw extensive military service in Piedmont during the Italian wars. He took a leading part in the major battles of the civil wars (at Dreux, 1562; St-Denis in 1567) and commanded the duc d'Anjou's forces at Jarnac and Moncontour in the third civil war. He was nominated grand-maître de l'artillerie and given the governorship of the Bastille on 5 November 1569. At the same time, he enjoyed a justified reputation as a negotiator, being charged by the French crown with brokering the peace at Longjumeau in 1568, and again at St-Germain-en-Laye in 1570. At the massacre of St Bartholomew he was noted for his intervention in saving the lives of his Huguenot kinsmen.

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Given the military government of La Rochelle on 3 February 1573, it was in this context that Foxe briefly mentions his being refused admittance to the town shortly afterwards (1583, p. 2153), a development that was the direct prelude to the famous, lengthy and ultimately unsuccessful siege of La Rochelle, where Biron himself was wounded. (J. Baltaux, M. Barroux, M. Prevost, and etc, eds. Dictionnaire de Biographie Française. 18 vols in progress. (Paris: Librairie Letouzey et Ané, 1932 -), 6, cols 517-18).

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2177 [2154]

A discourse of the bloudy Massaker in Fraunce.

about 7. monethes, MarginaliaThe siege of Rochel during 7. monethes. what skirmishes and conflicts were on both sides, it would requyre a lōg tractatiō. Marginalia7. Assaultes agaynst Rochell.To make short, 7. principal assaults  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, Appendix: ref page 751, line 5 from the bottom

The assaults during this memorable siege were nine in all: see the "Recueil", p. 478, and Laval's "Reformation in France," vol. iii. pt. i. page 473.

were geuen to the poore town of Rochell, with all the power that Fraunce could make. In all which assaultes euer the Popes catholick side had the worst. Concerning the first assault thus I finde written, that within the space of xxvj. dayes, were charged agaynst the walles and houses of Rochell, to the number of xxx. thousand shot of yron bullets and globes, wherby a great breach was made for the aduersary to inuade the City: but such was the courage of them within, not men onely, but also of women, matrons, and maydens with spits, fire, & such other weapon as came to hande, that the aduersary was driuen backe, with no small slaughter of theyr souldiours: onely of the townesmen were slayne & wounded to the number of lx. persons. Likewise in the secōd assault 2000.great fielde peaces were layde against the towne, whereupon the aduersary attempted the next day to inuade the towne: but through the industry of the souldiors and citizens, and also of women and maydes, the inuaders were forced at length to flye away faster thē they came. No better successe had all the assaults that folowed: Wherby consider (gentle reader) with thy selfe in what great distresse these good men were in, not of Rochell onely, but of other Cityes also, during these 7. Monethes aboue mentioned, had not the mighty hand of the Lord almighty susteined them. Concerning whose wondrous operation for his seruants in these hard distresses, three memorable thinges I finde in History to be noted.

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MarginaliaThree notable examples of Gods great mercy in preseruing his seruauntes.The one concerning the siege of Sanser, which City being terribly battered and raysed with gunshot of great Cannons, & field pieces, hauing at one siege no lesse then iij. thousand bullets and gunstones flying vppon them, wherwith the cristes of their helmets were pierced, their sleeues, their hose, their hattes pierced, theyr weapons in their handes broken, the walles shaken, theyr houses rent downe, yet not one person slayne nor wounded with all this, saue onely at the first a certeine mayden with the blast of the shot flying by her was stroken downe & died.

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MarginaliaThe 2. example.The 2. thing to be noted is this, that in the same City during all the time of the siege, which lasted 7. Monethes and halfe, for all the ordinaunce, and battering pieces discharged agaynst them, which are numbred to 6. thousand not so much as xxv. persons in all were slayne.

MarginaliaThe 3. miraculous worke of God, in sending in fishe.The third example no lesse memorable was at Rochell: Whereas the poorer sort began to lacke corne & victuall, there was sent to them euery day in the Riuer (by the hand of the Lord no doubt) a great multitude of fishe (called surdones) which the poorer people did vse in stead of bread. Which fish the same day as the siege brake vppe, departed, and came no more. Testifyed by them, whiche were present there in Rochell all the time.

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What number was lost on both sides, during all this 7. monethes warre, it is not certeinely knowne. Of the

kinges Campe what number was slayne, by this it may be coniectured, Marginalia132. Captaynes of the Kinges army slaine.that 132. of theyr Captaynes were killed & slayne, of whom the chiefest was Dukedamoule.

MarginaliaPeace concluded betweene the King and the Protestantes.To close vp this tragicall story, concerning the breaking vp of this 7. Monethes siege, thus it fell out, that shortly after the seuenth assaulte geuen agaynst Rochell, which was an. 1573. about the moneth of Iune, worde came to the Campe, that MarginaliaDuke Aniow the kinges brother made King of Poleland.Duke Andius the kinges brother, was proclaymed king of Polonie. Wherat great ioy was in the Campe. MarginaliaPeace agreed and concluded be.tweene the King and Protestantes of Rochel and certayne other Cityes.By occasion whereof, the new king more willing to haue peace, entred talke with thē of Rochell, who as he shewed himselfe to them not vngentle, so found he thē again, to him not vnconformable. Whervpon a certeine agreemēt pacificatory was concluded betwene them, vpon conditions. Which agrement the new Polone king eftsoones preferred to the Frenche King hys Brother not without some sute and intercession to haue it ratified. The king also himselfe partly being weary of these chargeable warres, was the more willing to assent therunto. And thus at length, through the Lordes great worke, the kinges royal consent vnder forme of an Edict, was sette downe in writing, and confirmed by the king, conteining 25. Articles. In which also wer included certeine other Cittyes of the Protestantes, graunting to them benefit of peace and liberty of religion. This edicte or mandate sent downe from the king by his Heralde at armes, Bironius in the kinges name caused to be solemnely proclaymed at Rochell. MarginaliaAnno. 1573. Iunii. 10.an. 1573. the x. day of Iune.

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MarginaliaThe death of Charles 9. French King and of the Cardinall of Lorayne.The yeare next folowing. 1574. for two thinges seemeth fatall and famous, for the death first of Charles the 9. the french king, also most of all for the death of Charles Cardinall of Lorayne, brother to Guise. Of the maner of the Cardinals death I finde litle mentiō in stories. Touching the kinges death although Ric. Dinothus sayth nothing,  

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Cattley/Pratt, VIII, 753, fn 1

"Paulo post illum tumultum rex Carolus mortuus est." Dinothus, Lib. v. p. 400. De Bello Civili Galllico. Basil. 1582. - ED.

for feare belike, because he being a french man, hys name is expressed and known: but an other story (whom the sayd Dinothus doth followe) bearing no name, sayeth thus, that he dyed the xxv. day of May, vpon Whitson euen, being of the age of 25. yeares: and addeth more, profluuio sanguinis illum laborasse certū est. 
Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Foxe text narrative. Ric. Dinothus. Ex Commentariis de Statu Gallico. part. 4.
Foxe text Latin

profluuio sanguinis illum laborasse certum est. Constans fert fama, illum dum e variis corporis partibus sanguis emanaret, in lecto saepe volutatum, inter horribilium blasphemarium diras, tantam sanguinis vim proiecisse, vt paucas post horas mortuus fuerit.

Foxe text translation

Certayne it is, that his sickenes came of bleeding. The constant report so goeth, that his bloud gushing out by diuers partes of his body, he tossing in his bedde, and casting out many horrible blasphemies, [layed vpon pillowes with his heeles vpward, and head downeward,] voyded so much bloud at his mouth, that in a few houres he dyed.

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Actual text of Dinothus

Certayne it is that his sickenes came of bleeding. And sayth further: Cōstans fert fama, illum dum e varijs corporis partibus sanguis emanaret, in lecto sæpe volutatum, inter horribilium blasphemiarū diras, tantā sanguinis vim proiecisse, vt paucas post horas mortuus fuerit. 
Latin/Greek Translations  *  Close
Foxe text narrative. Ric. Dinothus. Ex Commentariis de Statu Gallico. part. 4.
Foxe text Latin

profluuio sanguinis illum laborasse certum est. Constans fert fama, illum dum e variis corporis partibus sanguis emanaret, in lecto saepe volutatum, inter horribilium blasphemarium diras, tantam sanguinis vim proiecisse, vt paucas post horas mortuus fuerit.

Foxe text translation

Certayne it is, that his sickenes came of bleeding. The constant report so goeth, that his bloud gushing out by diuers partes of his body, he tossing in his bedde, and casting out many horrible blasphemies, [layed vpon pillowes with his heeles vpward, and head downeward,] voyded so much bloud at his mouth, that in a few houres he dyed.

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Actual text of Dinothus

That is. MarginaliaThe maner of Charles of French Kings death to be noted.The constant report so goeth, that his bloud gushing out by diuers partes of his body, he tossing in his bedde, and casting out many horrible blasphemies, layed vpon pillowes with his heeles vpward, and head downeward, voyded so much bloud at his mouth, that in few houres he dyed. Which story if it be true, MarginaliaEx Commentarijs. de Statu Gallico part. 4.as is recorded and testified, may be a spectable and example to all persecuting kinges and Princes polluted with the bloud of Christian Martyrs. And thus muche briefely touching the late terrible persecution in Fraunce.

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¶ The Conclusion of the worke.

ANd thus to conclude (good Christian Reader) this present tractation not for lacke of matter, but to shorten rather the matter for largenes of the volume, I here stay for this present time with further addition of more discourse either to ouerweary thee with longer tediousnes, or ouercharge the booke with longer prolixity, hauing hitherto set forth the Actes and Proceedinges of the whole Church of Christ, namely of the Church of England, although not in such particular perfectiō, that nothing hath ouerpassed vs. Yet in such generall sufficiency, that I trust not very much hath escaped vs, necessary to be knowne, touching the principall affayres, doinges and proceedinges of the Church and Churchmen. Wherein may be seene the whole state, order, discent, course and continuaunce of the same, the encrease and decrease of true religion, the creeping in of superstition, the horrible troubles of persecution, the wonderfull assistaunce of the almighty in mainteining his truth, the glorious constancy of Christes Martyrs, the rage of the enemyes, the alteration of times, the trauelles and troubles of the Church, from the first primatiue age of Christes Gospel, to the end of Queen Mary, and the beginning of this our gracious Queene Elizabeth. During the time of her happy reigne, which hath hetherto continued (through the gracious protection of the Lord) the space now of 24. yeres, as my wish is, so I would be glad, the good wil of the Lord were so, that no more matter of such lamētable stories may euer bee offered hereafter to write vpon. But so it is I cannot tel how, the elder the world waxeth, the longer it continueth, the nerer it hasteneth to his end, the more Sathan rageth: geuing still new matter of writing bookes and volumes: In so much that if all were recorded and committed to history, that within the sayd compasse of this Queenes reigne hitherto, hath happened in Scotland, Flanders, France, Spayne, Germany, besides this our owne Countrey of England and Ireland, with other Countryes moe, I verely suppose one Eusebius or Polyhistor, whiche Plinnye writeth of, woulde not suffice thereunto. But of these incidentes and occurrentes hereafter more, as it shall please the Lord to geue grace and space. In the meane time the grace of the Lord Iesus worke with thee (gentle Reader) in all thy studious readinges. And while thou hast space so employ thy selfe to read, that by reading thou mayst learne dayly to knowe that may profite thy soule, may teach thee experience, may arme thee with pacience, and instruct thee in all spirituall knowledge more and more, to thy perpetuall comfort and saluation in Christ Iesu our Lord, to whome be glory in Secula Seculorum. Amen.

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FINIS.

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