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Arras (Atrecht: Dutch)Calais
 
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Arras (Atrecht: Dutch)

Nord-Pas de Calais, France

Coordinates: 50° 17' 23" N, 2° 46' 51" E

 
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Calais

[Calyce; Calice; Calis; Callis]

Pas-de-Calais, France

Coordinates: 50° 56' 53" N, 1° 51' 23" E

728 [704]

K. Hen. 6. Accusation against the Cardinall. The trouble of Duke Humfrey.

MarginaliaWint. presumeth to be Cardinall against the minde of his king.FIrst complayned to his soueraigne Prince his right redoubted Lord duke Humfrey, his vncle and protector of the realm, that the bishop of Winchester, in the dayes of his father king Henry the 5. took vppon him the state of a cardinall, being denyed by the king, saying that he had as liefe set his owne crowne beside hym, as to see him weare a cardinals hatte, and that in Parliamentes, he not beyng contented with the place of a bishop among the spirituall persons presumed aboue hys order, whiche the sayd Duke desired to be redressed.

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MarginaliaWint. incurreth the law of premuniri.2. Item, whereas he being made Cardinal, was voyded of his bishopricke of Winchester, he procured from Rome the Popes Bull, vnknowing to the king, whereby he took agayne his bishopricke, contrary to the common lawe of this realme, incurring therby the case of prouision, and fore feiting all his goodes to the king, by the law of premuniri facias.

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MarginaliaWint. intrudeth himselfe to be the kinges gouernour.3. Item, he complayned that the said Cardinall, with the Archbishop of Yorke, intruded themselues to haue the gouernaunce of the king, and the doing vnder the king, of tēporall matters, excluding the kings vncle, and other temporall Lordes of the kinges kinde, from hauing knowledge of any great matter.

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MarginaliaThe Cardinall defraudeth the king of his iewels.4. Item, wheras the king had borowed of the Cardinall 4000. pounds, vpon certayne Iewels, and afterward had his mony ready at the day to quite his iewels: the Cardinall caused the treasurer to conuert that mony, to the payment of an other armye, to keepe the Iewels still to hys owne vse and gayne.

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MarginaliaThe Cardinall deliuereth the K. of Scottes. vpon his owne authoritie.5. Item, he being then bishop of Winchester, and Chancellour of England, deliuered the king of Scottes, vpon his own authoritie, contrary to the act of parliameut, wedding his nece afterward to the sayd king. Also where the said king of Scottes shoulde haue payd to the king forty thousand pounds, þe cardinall procured x. thousand marks therof to be remitted, and yet the rest very slenderly payd.

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MarginaliaThe Cardinall playeth the marchant.6. Item, the sayd cardinall, for lending notable sommes to the king, had the profite of the port of Hampton: where he, setting his seruauntes to be the Customers, wolle and other marchaundise was, vnder that clok, exported not somuch to his singular vauntage, being the chiefe marchant, as to the great preiudice of the king, and detriment to his subiectes.

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7. Item, the cardinall, in lending out great summes to þe king, yet so differred and delayed the loane thereof, þt comming out of season, the same did the king litle pleasure, but rather hinderaunce.

MarginaliaThe Cardinall a defrauder of the king.8. Item, where iewels & plate were prised at a 11. thousand poundes in weight, of the sayd Cardinall forfeited to the king: the cardinall for loane of a little peece, gat him a a restorement thereof, to the Kings great dammage, who better might haue spared the commons if the somme had remayned to him cleare.

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9. Item, where the kinges father had geuen Elizabeth Bewchampe. CCC. markes of liuelode, with this condition if she wedded with in a yeare, the Cardinall, notwith standing she was maryed two or three yeares after, yet gaue her the same, to the kinges great hurt, and diminishing of hys inheritaunce.

MarginaliaThe Cardinall taketh vpon him like a king.10. Item, the Cardinall hauing no authoritie nor interest to the crown, presumed notwithstanding to cal before him, like a King, to the kinges high derogation.

11 Item, that the Cardinall sued a pardon from Rome, to be freed from all dismes, due to the Kyng by the church of Winchester, geuing thereby example to the Clergye, to withdraw their dismes likewise, and lay all the charge only vpon the temporaltie, and poore commons.

12. 13. Item, by the procuring of the sayd Cardinall and Archbishop of Yorke, great goodes of the kings were lost and dispended vpon needles Ambassades, first to Arras, then to Calice.

14. Item it was layd to the charge of the sayd Cardinall and archbishop, that by their meanes, goyng to Calice, the ij. enemies of the king, the Duke of Orleance, and Duke of Burgoyne, were reduced together in accorde & alliaunce, who being at warre before betwene themselues, and now cōfederate together, ioyned both together agaynst þe kings townes and countryes ouer the sea, to the great daunger of Normandy, and destruction of the kinges people.

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MarginaliaThe Cardinall traytour to the crowne.15. Item, by the archbishop of Yorke, and the Cardinall perswasiōs were moued opēly in the kings presence, with allurementes and inducementes, that the king shoulde leaue hys right, his title and honour of his crowne, in nominating him king of Fraunce, during certayne yeeres, & that he shoulde vtterly absteyne, and be content onely in writing, with Rex Angliæ, to the great note and infamye of the king and of all his progenitours.

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16. 17. Item, through the sleight and subtlety of the saydeCardinall and his mate, a new conuention was intended betweene the king and certayne aduersaryes of Fraunce. Also þe deliueraunce of the Duke of Orleance was appointed in such sort, as therby gret disworship & inconueniēce was like to fall, rather of the kinges side then of the other.

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MarginaliaThe Card. a purchaser of the kings landes.18. Item, that the Cardinall had purchased great landes and liuelodes of the king, the Duke being on the other side the sea occupyed in warres, whiche redounded little to the worship and profite of þe king: and moreouer had the kinge bound, to make him as sure estate of all those landes by Easter next, as could be deuised by any learned councel, or els þe said cardinal to haue and enioy to him and his heyres for euer, the landes of the Duchie of Lancaster in Northfolke to the value of 7. or 8. hundred markes by the yeare.

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MarginaliaPeruerse counsaile of the Cardinall.19. Item, where the Duke the kinges vncle, had often- offered his seruice for the defence of the Realme of France, and the duchie of Normandy, the Cardinall euer laboured to the contrary, in preferring other, after this singular affection: whereby a great part of Normandy had bene lost.

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MarginaliaThe Card. a deceauer of the king & a briber.20. Itē, seeing þe Cardinall was risen to such riches & treasure, which could grow to him, neyther by his Church, nor by enheritāce (which he then had) it was of necessitie to be thought, that it came by his great deceites, in deceiuinge both the king, and hys subiects, in selling offices, prefermentes, liuelodes, captaynships both here and in þe realm of Fraunce and in Normandy, so that what hath ben there lost, he hath bene the greatest causer thereof.

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MarginaliaThe Card. purchaseth a pardon against his premuniri.21. Furthermore, when the sayd Cardinal had forfeited al hys goods by the statute of prouision, he hauing the rule of the king, and of other matters of the realme: purchased frō the pope a charter of pardon, not onely to the defeating of the lawes of the Realme, but also to the defrauding of the king, who otherwise might and should haue had where wt to susteine his warres, without any tallage of his poore people. &c.

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When the king heard these accusations, he committed þe hearing therof to his counsaile: wherof þe most part were spirituall persons. MarginaliaPrelates holde one with an other.So, what for feare, and what for fauour the matter was wincked at, & dalied out, and nothing said thereunto, and a fayre countenaunce was made to þe Duke as though no displeasure had bene taken, nor malice borne in these spirituall stomaches. But shortly after, the smoke hereof, not able to keepe in any longer within the spiritual brestes of these charitable churchmen, brast out in flames of mischiefe. For vpon the necke of this matter, as witnesseth Fabian Polychronicon, and Hall whiche followeth Polych, first ensued the condemnation of L. Elianour the Duches and her Chapleynes, as ye haue heard before. Whereby it may appeare the sayd Duches more of malice, MarginaliaMalice burst out. then any iust cause, this to haue bene troubled. Also within vi. yeares after, followed the lamentable destruction of the Duke himselfe, as hereafter more is to be declared.

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MarginaliaPaules steeple set on fire by lightningAbout which time, or not long after, an. 1443. the steeple of Paules was set on fire by lightening, and at last by dilligent labour of helpers, the fire was quenched.

Marginalia

Anno. 1445

The death of Henry Chichesley Archb. of Cant.

And after the condemnation of lady Elianour the Duches, aforesayd, within few yeares. an. 1445. followed the death of Henry Chichesley Archbishop of Cant. by whom she was condemned in S. Stephens chappell at Westin. for penaunce to beare a taper through cheapside three sondry times, and afterward outlawed to the Ile of Manne, vnder the custody of syr Iohn Standly knight. MarginaliaThe building of Alsolne Colledge and Barnard Colledge in Oxforde.This Hēry Chichesley builded in hys time, 2. Colledges in the vniuersitie of Oxford, the one called Alsolne Colledge, the other named Barnard Colledge.

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Marginalia

Anno. 1447

The storie & death of Humfrey, Duke of Gloucester.

Proceeding now to the yeare, wherein suffered Humfrey þe good Duke of Gloucester, which was the yeare of þe Lord. 1447. first we will being in few words to intreat of his life & conuersation: then of the maner and cause of hys death. As touching the ofspring and dissent of this Duke, first he was the sonne of Henry the fourth, brother to kyng Henry the fift, and vncle to kyng Henry the sixt, assigned to be the gouernour and protector of his person. Of manners he seemed meeke and gentle, louing the common wealth, a supporter of the poore commons, of wit & wisdome discreet and studious, well affected to religion, and a frend to veritie, & no les enemy to pride & ambitiō, especially in hauty prelates, which was his vndoing in this presēt euil world: And, which is seldome & rare in such princes of þt calling, he was both learned himselfe: MarginaliaDuke Humfrey cōmended for his learning. & no lesse geuen to study, as also a singular fauourer & patron to them which were studious & learned. And that my commendation of him may haue the more credite, I wil produce the testimony of learned writers, who liuing in hys time, not only do cōmend his famous knowledge, and ripenes of learning in him: but also commit & submit their works to his iudge ment to be examined. Of whiche writers one is Petrus de

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