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Alkmaar [Alquemare]

North Holland, Netherlands

Coordinates: 52° 37' 48" N, 4° 45' 0" E

 
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Beverley in Holderness
NGR: TA 032 400

A borough, market town and head of a liberty, having separate jurisdiction in the East Riding of the County of York. 9 miles north-east from Kingston upon Hull, Beverley comprises the parishes of St John, St Martin, St Mary and St Nicholas, all within the Archdeaconry of the East Riding and diocese of York. The living of St John is a perpetual curacy with that of St Martin united. The living of St Mary is a vicarage, with that of St Nicholas united.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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King's Lynn (Bishop's Lynn) [Lennam; Linne; Lynne]

Norfolk

OS grid ref: TF 615 205

 
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Kings Lynn, Lynn Regis
Linne, Lynn, Lynne
NGR: TF 615 200

A borough having exclusive jurisdiction, although locally in the Lynn division of the hundred of Freebridge, county of Norfolk. 44 miles west by north from Norwich. The town comprises the parishes of All Saints, Southgate, St. Edmund, North End, and St. Margaret's; all in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Norwich. The living of All Saints is a vicarage; St. Edmund, North End is a sinecure rectory; and St. Margaret's is a perpetual curacy

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Pontefract (Pomfret) [Poiz]

West Yorkshire

OS grid ref: SE 455 215

 
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Ravenspur

East Riding of Yorkshire [at the mouth of the Humber, now submurged]

 
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The Hague [Hage]

South Holland, Netherlands

Coordinates: 52° 4' 48" N, 4° 18' 0" E

738 [714]

K. Edward. 4. Warre betwene the K. and the Earle of Warwicke. K. Henry restored.

true to the king his maister: and the Lord Scales brother to the Queene, sent abroad to all his trusty frendes for furniture of able souldiors for defence of his person to wtstand his enemies. MarginaliaK. Edward forsaken of his people in his neede.Whē litle rescue & few in effect would come, the king himselfe so destitute, departed to Lincolneshyre, MarginaliaThe weake state of king Edward.where he perceiuing his euemyes dayly to encrease vpon him, & all the countryes about to be in a rore, making fiers & singing songs, crying king Henry, king Henry, a Warwicke, a Warwicke, and hearing moreouer his enemyes þe Lancastrians to be within halfe a dayes iourney of him, was aduised by his frendes to flie ouer the Sea to þe Duke of Burgoyne, which not long before had maryed king Edwardes sister.

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MarginaliaWhether godly simplicitie, or mans policie be stronger.¶ Here might be thought, by the common iudgement and pollicy of man, peraduētnre that king Edward, as he had in his handes the life of king Henry of his Queene and Prince: so if hee had dispatched them out of the way, when as he might, he had not fallen into this misery: but because he tooke not the vauntage, whiche time rather then godly reason gaue him, therefore that sparing pitty of hys turned now to his confusion and ruine. And certes, I suppose no lesse, but if the same case had fallen in these our pitilesse dayes, in which charity now waxeth vtterly colde, and humanitye is almost forgotten, the occason of suche a tyme should not be so neglected. But let vs here note and learn, how godly simplicity alwayes in the end of thinges gayneth more then mans pollicy, forsomuche as man worketh with the one, but God worketh with the other.

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MarginaliaThe double case of these two kings consideredAnd so farre is it of, that the euēt and successe of thinges be gouerned by mans aduised pollicy, or vnaduised affection in this world, that that is iudged to be weaker that florisheth in man, then that which is cast downe in the Lord: as in the double case of both these kings may wel appeare. And first let vs consider the case of king Edward who being so beset and compassed with euils and distresses on euery side, MarginaliaK. Edward taketh the Washes.first was compelled to take the Washes betwene Lincolneshyre and Lynne (which was no less daungerous to his life then it was vnsemely for his estate.) Being come to Linne, in what perill was he there, through the doubtfull mutabilitye of the townes men, if he had beene known to his enemyes? And how could he be but known, if he had taried any space? MarginaliaGod prouidethBut though men and frends forsook him, yet the mercy of God not forsaking the life of him which shewed mercy vnto other, so prouided, that at þe same present there was an Englishe shippe, and two hulkes of Holland ready to theyr iourney. Thus king Edward wtout prouision, without bag or baggage, without clothsacke or male, without store of money, without rayment, saue onely apparell for warre, also without all frendes, excepte onely his brother Duke of Glocester, the Lord Scales, & Lord Hastinges, with a fewe other trustye frendes, to the number of 7. or 8. hūdreth persons MarginaliaK. Edward taketh shipping.tooke shipping toward Holland: at which time he was in no less ieoperdy almost on the sea, then he was on the land. For certayne Esterlinges hauing many shippes of warre, which lay rouing the same time on the sea, and had done much domage the yeare before, as well to the Englishe Marchauntes, as to the French nation, spying the kinges ship, with seuen or eight gallaunt shippes made sayle after the king and hys company. MarginaliaK. Edward near taken of the Esterlings. The kinges shippe was good of sayle, and gate some ground, albeit not much of the Esterlinges, that she came to the coast of Halland, before Alquemare, and there cast anker: for otherwise, being an ebbing water, they coulde not enter the hauen. The Esterlings with theyr great shippes approched as nere as they could possible come for the low water, purposing at þe floud to obtein their pray, & so were like to do, MarginaliaGod againe prouideth. if the Lord had not there also prouided Mounsiour de Grounture, gouernour for Duke Charles in Holland, at that season to be personally present in the towne of Alquemare, who hering of the ieopardy of the king, being there at anker, MarginaliaK. Edward deliuered from the Esterlinges.prohibited the Esterlings on payne of death, not to meddle with any English men, which were the Dukes frendes and alies.

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Thus K. Edward well chastised of God for his wantonnes both by sea and land, but not vtterly geuē ouer frō his protection, escaping so many hard chaūces, was set on land with his company, who there well refreshed, & newly apparelled, were conducted to Hage.

MarginaliaCharles Duke of Burgoyne, K. Edwardes brother in law.Duke Charles at the hearing of the vnprosperous case and condition of king Edward his brother in lawe, was greatly amased and perplexed in himself, much casting and doubting what he should do: For, being then in war with the French king, he could not well prouoke the Englishe nation agaynst him, without his manifest greuaunce and decay: neither yet could he without great shame and obloquy, leaue the king his brother in that necessity. Notwith-standing, so he demannured himselfe through fayre speach, pretending to the English men to ioyne part with þe house of Lancaster, being himselfe partly descended of the same family by his Graundmothers side: that he both was his owne frend openly, and the kinges friend couertly, pretending that he did not, and doing that he pretended not.

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Whē tidings was spred in England of king Edwards flying, innumerable people of al hands resorted to þe Earle of Warwicke, to take his part, agaynst K. Edward a fewe onely except of his constant friends which tooke sanctuary. MarginaliaQueene Elizabeth taketh sanctuary.Among whom was also Elizabeth his wife, who desperat almost of all comfort, tooke also sanctuarye at Westminster, where she in great penury forsakē, MarginaliaPrince Edward borne in sanctuary.was deliuered of a fayre sonne called Edw. which without all pompe was baptysed like another poore womans childe, the Godfathers being the Abbot and Prior of Westminster, the Godmother was Lady Scroope.

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To make the story short, the Earle of Warwick hauing now brought all things to his appetite, vpon the 12. day of October, rode to the Tower, which was then deliuered to him, MarginaliaK. Henry 6. brought out of the tower.and there tooke king Henry out of the ward, & placed him in the kinges lodging. The 25. day of the sayd moneth, the Duke of Clarence accōpanyed with the Erles of Warwick, Shrewsbury, and the Lord Standley, with a great company, MarginaliaK. Henry restored again to his kingdome.brought him in a long gown of blew veluet thorow the hye streetes of London, first to Paules Church, to offer, then to the bishops palace of London, and there he resumed agayne the crowne royall, an. 1471. which he did not long enioy.

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After this followed a Parliament, in the whiche king Edwarde with all his partakers were iudged traytours, Queene Margarete with her sonne Prince Edwarde, all this while was tarying for a fayre winde, thinking long belike, till she came to an euill bargayne, as it proued after. MarginaliaK. Edward returneth againe into England.For king Edwarde within sixe monethes after his departure our of Englande vnto the Duke of Burgoyne, whether by letters from his frendes sollicitate, or whether by his aduēturous courage incited, made instant sute to duke Charles his brother, to rescue him with such power, as he would bestow vpon him, for he was fully resolued to defer the matter and to protract the time no longer.

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The Duke damped in double feare, in such a daungerous case, notwithstanding ouercome by nature and affinity, secretly caused to be deliuered to him 50000. Florence, & further caused foure great shippes to be appoynted for him in a hauen in Zeland where it was free for al men to come. Also the same Duke had for him hired 14. shippes of the Esterlinges well appoynted, taking hand of them to serue him truely, till he were landed in England, and 15. dayes after.

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MarginaliaK. Edward onely with 2000. souldiours commeth to Rauenspurre, aliás Rauensport.Thus king Edwarde being furnished but onely with 2000. men of warre, with more lucke then hope to speede, sped his voyage into England, and landed at Rauenspur in the coast of Yorkeshyre. Although there was no way for the king with such a small company of souldiors to do any good, yet to vse pollicy, where strength did lack, first he sent forth certayne light horsemen, to proue the countrey on euery side, with persuasions, to see whether the vplandyshe people would be styrred to take king Edwards part. MarginaliaThe dissembling policy of king Edward.Perceiuing that it woulde not be, king Edward flyeth to hys shiftes, dissembling his purpose to be, not to clayme the crowne and kingdome, but onely to clayme the Duchy of Yorke, whiche was his owne title, and caused the same to be published. This being notified to the people, that he desired no more, but onely his iust patrimony and lineall inheritaunce, they began to be moued with mercy and compassion toward him, either to fauour him or not to resiste him, and so iournying toward Yorke, he came to Beuerly. The Marques Mountacute, brother to the Earle of Warwicke, was then at Pomfret, to whom the Earle had sent strayght charge, with all expedition to set vpon him, or els to stop his passage: and likewise to the Citizens of Yorke and all Yorkeshyre, to shut theyr gates and take armour agaynst him, MarginaliaK. Edward commeth to Yorke.King Edward being in the streetes, proceeded notwithstanding nere to Yorke, without resistaunce: where he required of the Citizens, to be admitted into theyr Citty. MarginaliaK. Edward repelled by the citizens of Yorke.But so stoode the case then, that they durst not graunt vnto him, but contrary sent him word to approch no nearer, as he loued his owne safegarde. The desolate king was here driuen to a narow strait, who neyther could retyre backe, for the opinion of the countrey and losse of his cause: neither could goe further, for the present daunger of the City. Marginalia

K. Edward chaungeth his title.

The gentle and fayre wordes of K. Edward.

Wherefore vsing the same pollicy as before, with louely words, and gentle speech he desired the messengers to declare vnto the Citizens, that his comming was not to demaund the realme of England, or the title of the same but onely the Duchye of Yorke, his olde inheritaunce, and

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