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Abingdon
Abyngdon
NGR: SU 495 795

A borough, having separate and exclusive jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Harmer, county of Berkshire, of which it is the chief town. 6 miles south from Oxford, 26 miles north west by north from Reading. The town comprises the parishes of St. Helens and St. Nicholas, both in the Archdeaconry of Berkshire, Diocese of Salisbury. The living of St. Helens is a vicarage, with the sinecure rectory of St. Nicholas annexed.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Bath [Bathe]

Somerset

OS grid ref: ST 745 645

 
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Beaulieu [Beaulie]

Hampshire

OS grid ref: SU 385 025

 
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Bristol
Bristoll, Brystoll, Bristow, Bristowe
NGR: ST 590 730

A city and county of itself, between the counties of Gloucester and Somerset. 34 miles south-west by south from Gloucester, 12 miles north-west from Bath. Bristol is the seat of a diocese, established in 1542. The city comprises the parishes of All Saints, St. Augustine, Christ Church, St. Owen, St. John Baptist, St. Leonard, St. Mary le Port, St. Mary Redcliffe, St. Michael, St. Nicholas, St. Peter, St. Werburgh, St. Stephen and St. Thomas. Also the Temple parish, and parts of St. James, St. Paul, St. Philip and St. Jacob. All are within the peculiar jurisdiction of the bishop. Christ Church, St. John Baptist, St. Mary le Port, St. Michael, St. Peter, St. Stephen and St. Werburgh are discharged rectories. St. Leonard, St. Mary Redcliffe, St. Nicholas, The Temple, St. Philip and St. Jacob are discharged vicarages. St. James and St. Thomas are perpetual curacies, the latter annexed to the vicarage of Bedminster, Archdeaconry of Bath, Diocese of Bath and Wells.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Chertsey

[Chertesey]

Surrey

OS grid ref: TQ 043 671

 
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Gloucester
Gloucester
NGR: SO 830 187

A city and county of itself, locally in the hundred of Dudstone and Kings Barton, county of Gloucester. 34 miles north-north-east from Bristol. The city comprises the parishes of St. Aldate, St. John Baptist, St. Mary de Crypt, St. Mary de Grace, St. Nicholas, St. Owen and Holy Trinity; also parts of St. Catherine, St. Mary de Lode and St. Michael, all in the Archdeaconry and diocese of Gloucester, of which it is the seat. St. John Baptist, St. Mary de Crypt and St. Michael are discharged rectories; St. Mary de Lode and Holy Trinity are discharged vicarages; St. Aldate, St. Catherine, St. Mary de Grace and St. Nicholas are perpetual curacies

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Marlborough
Marlborough, Marlborow, Malbrough
NGR: SU 184 695

A borough and market town, having separate jurisdiction, although locally in the hundred of Selkley, county of Wilts. 27 miles north by east from Salisbury. Marlborough comprises the two parishes of St Mary the Virgin and SS Peter and Paul, within the peculiar jurisdiction of the Consistorial Episcopal court of Salisbury. The living of St Mary is a discharged vicarage, and that of SS Peter and Paul a discharged rectory

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Tewkesbury
NGR: SO 893 325

A borough and parish, having separate jurisdiction, locally in the lower division of the hundred of Tewkesbury, county of Gloucester. 10 miles north-north-east from Gloucester. The living is a vicarage in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of Gloucester.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Windsor
NGR: SU 967 768

A borough, market town and parish having separate jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Ripplesmere, county of Berkshire. 20 mile east by north from Reading, 22.5 miles west by south from London. The castle, built by Henry I, occupies more than 12 acres of ground, comprising upper, lower and middle wards. A principal royal residence in Tudor times. The living [of the town] is a discharged vicarage in the Archdeaconry of Berkshire, Diocese of Salisbury.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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740 [716]

K. Ed. 4. Queene Margaret ouercome in battel. Prince Edw. slaine. The death of K. Hen. 6.

wayling hir sonne, cursing her comming, and crieng out of Fortune, as though blinde Fortune were she that gouerneth times and tides, rewarding iust punishments to vniust deseruings of men, and not the secret power and terrible iustice of almighty God. MarginaliaQueene Margaret for sorow swoundeth.Such was then the impaciency of that Queene, being not able to beare the vehemency of her passion (who rather should haue sorrowed the dolorous death of Duke Humfrey, whome before she neglected, but now she lacked) that her senses failed, MarginaliaEx Polyd. lib. 24her spirites were taken, her speach decayed, and life almost gone, she fell to the ground as one that would rather dye, then liue. In this desolate case, Queene Margaret learning now to know her friends frō her foes, when it was too late, fraught ful of heauines, without solace, or hope of remedy, MarginaliaQueene Margaret taketh sanctuary.she with her son & her company departed for her next refuge, to a Monastery of Monkes called Beaulie in Hamshire, there to take sanctuary, & priuiledge of þe house.

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Yet all harts were not sound nor subdued in England, especially Edmond Duke of Somerset, with Lord Iohn his brother, Thomas Courtney, Earle of Deuonshire, Iasper earle of Pembroke, Lord Wenlocke, Iohn Longscrother, being Prior of the Knights of Rhodes in Saint Iohns. MarginaliaQueene Margaret moued by her friendes to renue warres against King Edward.These hearing of þe Queenes returne, with speede resorted to her, by whome she being somewhat quickened in her spirits, and animated to warre, began to take some hart, and to follow their counsaile: which was, in all the whote hast, to renew warre against King Edward, being now vnprouided, by reason his army was now dispersed, and chiefest of his souldiours wasted. Heere great hope of victory was shewed, great promises made. Although the Queenes mind was, beeing more carefull for the yong Prince, then for her selfe, to sende him ouer into France, before some proofe of triall made: yet following the contrary counsaile of them, and partly cut off by shortnesse of time, which required haste, she began with all expedition to gather power. Likewise Iasper Earle of Pembroke posted into Wales to do the same.

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MarginaliaK. Edward warreth against Queene Margaret.King Edward hauing intelligence of all these doings, first sendeth out certain light horsemē, to espy abroad thorough the West parts, what waies his enemies did take. In the meane time, he vsing al celeritie to meete them before they came to London, gathered a power, such as hee could make about Lōdon, and first cōmeth to Abyngdon: from thence to Marlebridge, hearing that þe Queene was at Bathe, thinking to encounter with them, before they diuerted into Wales to the Earle of Pembroke, whether he thought (as they in deede intended) that they woulde take. But þe Queene vnderstanding the king to be so nie, remoueth from Bathe to Bristow, sending word in the meane while to þe citizens of Gloucester, that they would graunt her leaue safely to passe by their Citie. MarginaliaQueene Margaret debarred from Glocester.Which whē it could not be obteined, with her army she departeth frō Bristow to Teukesbery: where the D. of Somerset knowing king Edward to be at his hand at his very backe, willed the Queene there to stay, & in no wise to flie backward for certaine doubts that might be cast. Although this coūsaile was against the consent of many other captaines, who though it best rather to draw aside while the Earle of Pembroke with his army were with them associate: yet the mind of the Duke preuailed. MarginaliaThe battayle of Teukesbury.The place was prefixed, the field pitched, the time of battaile came, the King was loked for: who being within one mile of Tewkesbury, with like industry & policy, as his enemies had done, disposed his army likewise in their aray. This celeritie of the King taking the time, MarginaliaA great matter to take a thing in tyme. was to him great aduantage: who otherwise if he had differred, till they had conioined with the Earle of Pembroke, had put the matter in great hazard. Such a matter it is to take a thing in time.

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Of this battayle Hall this reporteth, adding more then Polidore, þt the D. of Somerset, although he was strōgly intrenched, yet through þe occasin or policie of the Duke of Gloucester, which had the fore ward of the kings part, a little recusing back, followed the chase, supposing that þe Lord Wenlock, who had þe middle ward, would haue followed hard at his backe. The duke of Glocester, whether for shame, rather then of policie, espieng his aduātage, sodenly turned face to his enemies. Whereupon the cōtrary part was eftsoones discomfited, and so much the more, because they were separate frō their company. The Duke of Somerset not a litle agreued at this so vnfortunate case, returneth to þe middle ward, where he seeing the L. Wenlocke abiding still, reuileth him, and calleth him traytour, and with his axe striketh the braine out of his head.

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Thus much addeth Hall besides Polydor, but sheweth not his author where he had it. Polydore writing of this conflict, writeth no more but this, that þe Queenes army being ouerset with the number and multitude of their ene-mies, and she hauing no fresh souldiours to furnish þe field, was at last ouermatched, and for þe most part slaine or taken. In which battaile were named to be slaine, þe Earle of Deuonshire, the Lord Wenlocke, Lord Iohn Duke of Somerset his brother, beside other. MarginaliaQueene Margaret takē in battayle.Among thē that were taken, was Queene Margaret foūd in her chariot almost dead for sorow, Prince Edward, Edmund D. of Somerset, Iohn Prior of S. Iohns, with xx. other knightes: all which were beheaded within ij. dayes after, the Queene only and the yong prince excepted. Which prince Edward being then brought to the Kings presence, was demaunded of him, how he durst be so bold to stand in battaile against him. To this Edward Hall addeth more, and saith: that after the field was finished, the King made Proclamation, that whosoeuer would bring Prince Edward to him, should haue annuitie of an C.li. during his life, and the Princes life to be saued. MarginaliaPrince Edwarde brought to the kyng.Whereupon sir Rich. Croftes not mistrusting the kings promise, brought forth his prisoner, &c. And so the king demanding of the Prince (as is said) how he durst so presumptuously enter this Realme with his banner displayed against him, he answered, sayeng: MarginaliaThe stoute answere of the Prince to the kyng.that he came to recouer his fathers kingdome and inheritance from his grandfather and father, to him descending: whereat (said Polydor) the King with his hande disdainingly thrust him from him. Other say that the king stroake him on the face with his gauntlet.

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MarginaliaPrince Edward sonne to K. Henry slaine.At the speaking of these words was present George Duke of Clarence, Richarde Duke of Gloucester, and the Earle Lord William Hastings. Who upon the same, vncourteously falling vpon the Prince, did slaye hym. MarginaliaQueene Margaret raunsomed for a great summe of money.Queene Margaret being brought prisoner to London, was afterwarde raunsomed of hir father Duke of Angeow, for a great summe of money which he borrowed of the French King, and for the paiment therof, was faine to yeeld vnto him the title of the kingdome of Sicile, and Naples, &c. King Edward for these prosperous warres, rendred to God his hartie thanks, and caused publikely through his realme, MarginaliaPublique processions for victory gotte.solemne processions to be kepte three daies together. And thus much, and too much, touchyng the warres of King Edward the fourth, which was done anno. 1471. MarginaliaAnno. 1471. Ex Polid. & alijs.

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MarginaliaThe death of K. Hen. 6.The same yeare, and about the same tyme, vppon the Ascension euen, king Henry being prisoner in the Tower, departed, after he had reigned in all xxxviij. yeares, and vi. moneths. Polydore and Hall following him, affirme that he was slaine with a dagger by Rich. Duke of Glocester, the Kings brother, for the more quiet and sauegard of the King his brother. In the history intituled MarginaliaEx Scala mundi.Scala mundi, I finde these words, Quod in turri, in vigilia Ascensionis Dominicæ ibidem feliciter moriens, per Thamesiam nauicula vsque ad Abbathiam de Chertesey deductus, ibi sepultus est. That is, that king Henry being in the Tower vpon the Ascension euen, there happely or quietly departing, was brought by Thames in a boate, to the Abbey of Chertesey, MarginaliaK. Henry buryed at Chertesey.and there buried.

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Polydore, MarginaliaPolydores myracles. after he hath described the vertues of thys king, recordeth that king Henry þe seuenth did afterwarde translate the corps of him frō Chertesey to Windsore, and addeth moreouer, that by him certayne myracles were wrought. For the which cause the sayde King Henry the seauenth (sayth he) laboured with Pope Iulius, to haue him canonised for a Saint, but the death of the king was the let, why þt matter proceeded not. Edward Hall writing of this matter, addeth more, declaring the cause, why king Henries sancting went not forward, to be this: MarginaliaA K. sainct, is dear ware in the popes market.for that the fees of canonising of a King, were of so great a quantitie at Rome (more then of another Bishop or prelate) that the said king thought it better to keepe the money in his chestes, then with þe empouerishing of þe realme to buy so deare, & pay so much for a new holy day of sainct Henry in the Calender, &c. Ex Hallo. MarginaliaEx Edw. Hallo. Which if it be true, it might be replied then to the Pope Iulius, that if Popes be higher then kings in the earth, and especially in heauē, why then is a Pope Saint so cheape in þe market place of Rome, and a King Saint so deare? Againe, if the valuation of things in all markets and burses, be according to the price & dignity of the thing that is bought, what reason is it, seing the sancting of a king beareth a bigger sale then the sancting of any Pope in heauen, but that Kings should be aboue Popes also vpon the earth? Sed extra iocum, as I do not doubt, but that K. Henry was a good & a quiet prince, if he had not otherwise bin abused by some: Marginalia

The cause examined of the fall of Lancaster house.

Example of Gods iust rodde of correction.

so touching the ruine of his house, I thinke not contrary, but it came not without the iust appointmēt of the Lord, either for that Henry of Lancasters house were such enemies to Gods people, & for the burning of the Lord Cobham and many other: or else for the vniust displacing of

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