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John Dale

(fl. 1539 - 1559)

Fellow of Queen's College (1542 - 1548). Chaplain and cross bearer to Cambridge University (1554). Rector of Little Shelford, Cambridgeshire, and of Wetheringsett, Suffolk (both in 1557). Did not subscribe to the oath of allegiance and was a recusant after 1558. (Venn)

A discussion of scripture and civil law was planned between Bonner and Dr Dale to be had with Bartlett Green. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

Dale was present at Philpot's presentment before Bonner on 17 November 1555. 1563, p. 1460, 1570, p. 2023, 1576, p. 1744, 1583, p. 1852.

John Dale misunderstood Nicholas Ormanet's request for the pixe and brought him instead a chalice and the host. 1563, pp. 1537 [recte 1549]-1558 [recte 1570]

John Dale was called a blockhead by Ormaneto for mistakenly bringing him a chalice and host instead of the pix he requested. 1563, p. 1544, 1570, p. 2147, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1960.

Dale was told by Ormaneto to treat the host reverently. 1563, p. 1544, 1570, p. 2147, 1576, p. 1867, 1583, p. 1960.

His body was infested with lice at his death. John Avales provided testimony of this. 1570, p. 2300, 1576, p. 1992, 1583, p. 2101.

[Not related to John Dale of Hadleigh.]

 
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Cardigan
NGR: SN 180 460

A seaport, borough, market town and parish, and the head of a union in the hundred of Troedyraur, county of Cardigan, 232 miles west by north from London. The living is a discharged vicarage. The borough was originally incorporated by Edward I after his final conquest of Wales.

English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Dale

Pembrokeshire, Wales

OS grid ref: SM 805 055

 
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Harfleur [Hareflew; Harflet]

Haute-Normandie, France

Coordinates: 49° 30' 18" N, 0° 12' 1" E

 
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Haverfordwest
Herefordwest
NGR: SM 955 155

A borough, a county of itself, and the head of a union, locally in the hundred of Rhos, county of Pembroke. 10.5 miles north from Pembroke. The town, and the county of the town, comprise the parish of St. Mary and part of the parishes of St. Thomas and St. Martin, all in the Archdeaconry and Diocese of St. David's. There is a large extra-parochial area called 'Poor Field'. The living of St. Mary is a vicarage; St. Thomas is a rectory not in charge; and St. Martin is a perpetual curacy.

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Lichfield
Lichfield, Lichfielde, Lichefield, Litchefield, Litchfield, Lychefield
NGR: SK 119 095

A city and county of itself, but locally in the county of Stafford. 16.5 miles south-east by east from Stafford. Lichfield, jointly with Coventry, is an episcopal see. The city comprises the parish of St. Mary, part of which is in the southern division of the hundred of Pirehill; St. Chad, part of which is in the northern division of the hundred of Offlow; and St. Michael, divided between the northern and southern divisions of the same hundred. The cathedral close is extra-parochial. St. Mary is a discharged vicarage; St. Chad and St. Michael are perpetual curacies; all in the peculiar jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter of Lichfield

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English information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1831)

Scottish information from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland (S. Lewis & Co: London, 1846)

Welsh information taken from Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales(Lewis & Co: London, 1840)

The reason for the use of these works of reference is that they present the jurisdictional and ecclesiastical position as it was before the major Victorian changes. The descriptions therefore approximate to those applying in the sixteenth century, after the major changes of 1535-42. Except for the physical locations, which have not changed, the reader should not therefore take these references as being accurate in the twenty-first century.

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Milford Haven [Milforde hauen]

Pembrokeshire, Wales

OS grid ref: SM 905 055

 
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Newport

Shropshire

OS grid ref: SJ 745 195

 
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Shrewsbury [Shrowesbury; Shrosbery; Shreusbury]

County town of Shropshire

OS grid ref: SJ 495 125

 
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Stafford

County town of Staffordshire

OS grid ref: SJ 925 235

752 [728]

K. Ric. 3. The tyranny of the protector. The. 2. yonge princes slaine. Duke of Buckingham.

spoken, endeuored to accomplish, MarginaliaThe Duke of Buckingham speaketh for the protectour in the Guildhall. making to the people a long and artificiall Oration, supposing no lesse, but that þe people allured by his crafty insinuations would cry, king Rich. K. Ric. But there was no king Rich. in their mouthes lesse in their hartes. Wherupon the Duke looking to the Lord Mayor, and asking what the silence ment, contrary to the promise of the one, & the expectation of þe other It was then answered of the Mayor, that the people peraduenture wel vnderstood him not: wherfore the Duke reiterating his narration in other wordes, declared agayne þt he had done before. Likewise the thyrd time he repeted hys Oration againe and agayn. MarginaliaAn hard thing to make the tongue speake against the hart.Then the commons which before stood mute, being now in a mase, seeing this importunitie, began to mutter softly among themselues, but yet no king Richard could sound in their lips, MarginaliaA stolne consent in the Guildhall,saue onely that in the nether end of the Hall, certayn of the Dukes seruantes with one Nashfield, and other belonging to the protector, thrusting into the Hall among the prease, began sodaynly at mens backes to cry king Richard k. Rich, throwing vp theyr cappes, whereat the cittizens turning backe theyr heades, marueiled not a little, but sayd nothing.

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The Duke and the Lord Mayor with that side, taking this for sufficient testimony, incontinent came blowing for hast to the protector, then lying at Baynardes Castle. MarginaliaFye of hipocrisieWhere the matter being made before, was now so contriued, that forsooth, humble petition was made in the name of the whole commons, and that with 3. sundry sutes, to þe humble and simpel protector, that he, although it was vtterly against his will to take it: yet would of his humilitye stoupe so low, as to receane the heauy kingdome of England vpon his shoulders. MarginaliaThe hypocrisie of the protector denying the crowne thrise before he would take it. At this their tender request and sute of the Lords and commōs made (ye must know how) þe milde Duke seing no other remedy, was contented at length to yeld, although sore against his will (ye must so imagine) and to submit himselfe so low, as of a protector to be made king: not much herein vnlike to our prelates in þe Popish churche, who when they haue before well compounded for the popes Buls, yet must they for maner sake make curtesy, and thrise deny that for whiche they so long before haue gaped, and so sweetly haue payed for.

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King Richard the third, vsurper.

MarginaliaKing Richard 3. vsurper.ANd thus 

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The accounts of Richard III's coronation, of the elevation of certain nobles, and the fates of Stanley and Morton, are all taken from Edward Hall, The union of the two noble and illustre famelies of Lancastre and York (London, 1560), STC 12723a, fo. 25v.

Richard Duke of Gloucester tooke vpon to be made & proclaymed king of England, the yeare aforesayd. an. 1483. in the mōth of Iune. Who then comming to the Tower by water, first made his sonne a childe of x. yeare old, prince of Wales, & Iohn HaWard (a man of great industry & seruice) he aduaūced to be Duke of Northfolke, & Sir. Tho. Haward his sonne, he ordained Erle of Surry. Also William Lord Barckeley was appoynted Earle of Notingham. Frances L. Louell, was made Vicunt Louell. L. Stanley for feare of his sonne, was deliuered out of the Tower, and made Steward of the kings houshold. Likewise the Archbishop of Yorke was set free: but Morton Bishop of Ely was committed to the Duke of Buckingham, by whome was wrought the first deuise to bring in Henry Erle of Richmond into England, and to cōioin mariage betweene Elizabeth king Edwardes daughter, and him, whereby the two houses of Yorke and Lancaster were vnited together.

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MarginaliaKing Richard crowned.After the kingdome of England was thus allotted to king Rich. the vsurper, as in maner aboue remembred, he taried not long for hys coronation, which was solemnised the month next ensuing, the 6. day of Iuly.

The triumph and solemnitie of this vsurped coronation, being finished, & al thinges to the same appertayning, this vnquiet tyraunt yet coulde not thinke himselfe safe, so long as yong Edward the right king & hys brother, were aliue: Wherefore the next enterprise which he did set vpon was this, how to rid these innocent babes out of the way, that he might reigne king alone.

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In the meane time while al this ruffling was in hand what dread & sorow the tender harts of these fatherles and friendles children were in, what little ioy of them selues what smal ioy of life they had, it is not so hard as dolorous for tender harts to vnderstand. As the yonger brother lingered in thought and heauines, so the prince which was a 11. yeare old, was so out of hart and so fraught with feare that he neuer tyed his poyntes, nor ioyed good day, till the trayterous impietie of their cruell vncle had deliuered thē of their wretchednes, whiche was not long in dispatching For after 

Commentary  *  Close

Foxe's account of the murders of Edward IV's sons and of the providential punishments of their murderers is drawn from The History of King Richard III, ed. Richard S. Sylvester in The Complete Works of St. Thomas More 2 (New Haven, CT, 1963), pp. 85-87.

king Richard their vncle, first attempting to cōpasse his diuelishe deuise by Robert Brakenbury Consta-ble of the tower, MarginaliaThe truth of Robert Brakenbury to his prince and could not winne him to suche a cruell fact (to die therefore) then he got one Iames Tyrell, ioyning with him Iohn Dighton, and Miles Forrest, to perpetrate this heinous murder. MarginaliaIames Tyrel I. Dighton, Miles Forest, cruell traytors and murtherers of their Prince. Which Dyghton and Forest about midnight entring into their chamber, so bewrapped and entangled them amongst the clothes, keeping downe the fetherbed and pilowes hard vnto their mouthes, that within a while: MarginaliaYoūg princes. The 2. children of king Edward murdered. they smoothered and stifeled them pitiously in their bed.

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And thus ended these two yong princes their liues, thorough the wretched cruelty of these forenamed tormentors who for their detestable and bloudy murder committed, escaped not long vnpunished by the iust hand of God. MarginaliaThe iust punishmēt of God vpō the murderers of them two.For first Miles Forest, at S. Martines le grand, by peecemeale miserably rotted away, Iohn Dighton liued at Callis lōg after so disdained and hated, that he was pointed of all men, and there died in great misery. Sir Iames Tyrell was beheaded at Tower hill for treason. MarginaliaThe punishment of God vpon K. Richard.Also King Richard himselfe within a yeare and a halfe after, was slayne in the field hacked and hewed of his enemies handes, torne and tugged like a curre dogge.

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MarginaliaThe punishmēt of God vpon the Duke of Buckinghā.Furthermore, the said iustice of gods hand left not the Duke of Buckingham escape free: whiche was a greate maintainer and setter vp of this butcherly vsurper: for les then within a yeare after so God wrought, that hee was himselfe beheaded for treason by the sayd king, whom he so vniustly before had aduaunced and set vp. 

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Foxe passes over the events of Richard III's reign between the deaths of the sons of Edward IV and the invasion of Henry VII, most especially Buckingham's rebellion against Richard in the autumn of 1483.

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MarginaliaDoct. Shaw and Doct. Pinkie, two flattering preachers.In the same catologue and order of these wicked doers afore recited, we haue also to comprehende two other, as well worthy of memoriall, as the best or rather as þe worst. The name of the one was doctour Shawe, aboue rehearsed: The other doctor Pinkie, prouincial of the Austen Friers: both famous preachers, and both Doctors in diuinitie both of more learning then vertue (sayth the story) of more fame thē learning, & yet of more learning thē truth. Shaw made a Sermon in the prayse of the Protector, before hys coronation. Pinkie preached after thys coronation. Both were so full of tedious flatterye, that no good eares coulde abide them. MarginaliaGods iudgement vpon flattering preachers.Pinkie in his sermon so lost his voyce, that he was fayne to leaue of & came downe in in the midst. Doctour Shaw by his sermon lost his honenesty, and soone after, his life for very shame of the world, so that he neuer durst after that, shew his face againe. But as for the Fryer, he was so farre past shame, that the losse therof did little touch him.

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Mention was made a little before, of Doctor Morton Bishop af Ely, by whose meanes the deuise was first broched, for the conioyning the two houses of Yorke & Lancaster together. MarginaliaThe first motion of ioyning the two houses, Yorke and Lancaster togeather. This deuise was first broken to the Duke of Buckingham, which soone after cost hym his life. But þe bishop more crafty to saue hymselfe, incontinent fled into Brittain. Notwithstanding, the deuise once being broched was so plausible, and tooke such effect, that message was sent ouer the sea to Henry Earle of Richmond, by his mother and by the Queene, mother to the Ladye Elizabeth, that if he would make hys returne, and promise to marry with the sayd Lady Elizabeth King Edwards daughter, he should be receaued. To make a longer discourse of thys matter, which is sufficiently set forth by S. Tho. More so ornately, it needeth not.

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Briefely (to contract that in a small compasse of wordes, which was not so small a thing in doing) after that 

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From here until the defeat and death of Richard III at Market Bosworth, Foxe's account is based on Polydore Vergil, Anglica historia (Isengrim, 1555), pp. 553-65.

the Earle Henry, with such other banished mē, as fled out of Englād at the taking of the Duke of Buckingham, had perfect intelligence by his mother and by the Queene and other frends moe out of England, how the case of þe realm stoode, and how it was here purposed by his frendes, that is, that he should with all conuenient speede, hast hys returne ouer into England, promising to mary with Ladye Elizabeth: MarginaliaEarle Henry maketh preparation toward his iourney. he with all diligence as tyme and preparation would serue, aduaūced forward his iourny, being wel helped and furnished by Fraunces Duke of Britayne, and so shipped his mē. Albeit his first voyage sped not, for that the winds turning contrary: by force of weather his ships were disparcled, and he repulsed backe into Fraūce agayn. His second viage was more prosperous. Who taking the seas at Harflet, in the moneth of August. an. 1485. accompanied onely with two thousand men, and a smal number of shippes, MarginaliaThe arriuing of Henry Earle of Richmōd in Wales.aryued at Milford Hauen in Wales, and fyrste came to Dale, then to Harford West, where he was ioyfully receiued, and also by the cōming in of Arnolde Butler and the Pēbroke men, was in power encreased. Frō thēce he remoued by Cardigan to Shrewsbery, & then to Newport, and so to Stafford, from thence to Liechfield, his army still more and more augmented. Lyke as a great floud by comming in of many small riuers, gathereth more aboundaunce of water: so to this Earle diuers noble Cap-

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taynes
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