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Cologne (Köln; Colonia Agrippina)MainzMetz
 
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Cologne (Köln; Colonia Agrippina)

[Colen; Colleyn; Collen; Colon]

North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany

Coordinates: 50° 57' 0" N, 6° 58' 0" E

Cathedral city

 
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Mainz

(Maguntiacum) [Mentz; Moguntia; Moguntina]

Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany

Coordinates: 50° 0' 0" N, 8° 16' 16" E

Cathedral city; seat of the prince-elector of Mainz

 
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Metz

Lorraine, France

Cathedral city

Coordinates: 49° 7' 13" N, 6° 10' 40" E

882 [858]

K. Hen 8. Martyn Luther. The aunswere of the Nobles to the Pope.

ing and protesting what a care it is to him both day & night, how to discharge his pastorall function, in studying for the health of the flocke to him committed: and especially in conuertinge the minds of Christian princes, from warre to peace: declaring moreouer what subsidie and reliefe his holinesse hath sent to the souldiers of Rhodes. &c. 

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I.e., to the Knights of St. John whose headquarters on Rhodes was under attack from the Turks.

All which things they perpēding with them selues, conceiue exceeding hope and comfort in their mindes, thus reputing and trusting that this cōcord of Christian princes, wil be a great helpe and stay to the better quieting of things now out of frame: without which neither the state of the cōmon welth, nor of Christian religion can be rightly redressed, and much lesse the tyrannie of the barbarous Turke repressed.

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Wherfore, the excellent prince, Lord Lieutenant to the Emperors maiestie, with the other princes Electors, and orders of this present assemble, most hartily doe pray that his holines wil persist in this his purpose & diligence, as he hath vertuously begun, leauing no stone vnremoued, how the disagreeing hearts of Christē princes may be reduced to quiet and peace: MarginaliaCan any good thing come out of Rome. or if that will not be, yet at least some truce and intermission of domestical dissentions may be obtained for the necessity of the time now present, wherby all Christians may ioyne their power together, with the helpe of God, to go against the Turke, & to deliuer the people of Christ from his barbarous tyrannie and bondage: Whereunto both the noble prince Lord Lieutenant, and other princes of Germany, wil put to their helping hands, to the best of their abilitie.

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And wheras by the letters of his holines, with his instruction also exhibited vnto them by his Legate, they vnderstand, that hys holines is aflicted with great sorow, for the prospering of Luthers sect, MarginaliaThe Pope much greeued for the prospering of Luthet. wherby innumerable soules committed to his charge, are in danger of perdition, & therefore his holines vehemently desireth some speedy remedy against the same to the prouided, with an explication of certaine necessary reasons & causes, wherby to moue the Germane princes therunto, and that they will tender the execution of the Apostolique sentence, and also of the Emperours edict, set forth touching the suppression of Luther: to these the L. Lieutenant and other princes and states doe answere, that it is to them no lesse griefe and sorow, then to his holines, and also do lament as much for these impieties and perils of soules, and inconueniences which grow in the religion of Christ, either by the sect of Luther, or any otherwise. Further, what help or counsel shall lie in them, for the extirping of errors, & decay of soules health, what their moderation can do, they are willing and ready to performe, considering how they stand bound & subiect, as wel to the Popes holines, as also to the Emperours maiestie.

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MarginaliaCauses why the princes haue not proceded by the Popes sentence against Luther.But why the sentence of the Apostolike see, & the Emperours edict against Luther, hath not ben put in execution hetherto, ther haue bene (said they) causes great and vrgent, which haue led thē therto: as first in weying and considering with them selues, that great euils & inconuenience wold therupon ensue. For the greatest part of the people of Germany haue alwaies had thys persuasion, & now by reading of Luthers bokes, are more therin cōfirmed, that great greeuances and inconueniences haue come to this nation of Germanie, by the courte of Rome: MarginaliaGreeuances receaued by the court of Rome. and therefore if they shuld haue proceded with any rigor in executing the Popes sentence, & the emperors edict, the multitude would conceiue & suspect in their minds, this to be done for subuerting the verity of the gospell, & for supporting & confirming the former abuses & greuances, wherupon great warres & tumults (no doubt) would haue ensued: which thing vnto the princes & setates ther, hath ben wel perceiued by many arguments. For the auoiding wherof, they thought to vse more gentle remedies, seruing more oportunely for the time.

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MarginaliaThe Pope aunswered with his owne wordes.Againe, wheras the reuerend L. Legate (said they) in the name of the Popes holines hath ben instructed, to declare vnto thē, that God suffreth this persecution to rise in the Church for the sins of men, & that his holines doth promise, therefore to begin the reformation with his owne court, that as the corruption first sprāg from thence to the inferior parts, so the redres of al againe should first begin with the same: Also, wheras his holines, of a good & fatherly heart, doth testify in his letters, that he himselfe did alwaies mislike that the Court of Rome should intermeddle so muche, and derogate from the cōcordates of the princes, and that his holines doeth fully purpose in that behalfe, during his papacie, neuer to practise the like, but so to endeuor, that euery one, and especially the nation of the Germanes may haue their proper due and right, graunting especially to the sayde nation, his peculiar fauour: who letteth not by these premisses, but that this moste holy B. omitteth nothing, which a good father or a deuout pastor may or ought to do to his sheepe? Or who wil not be moued hereby to a louing reuerence, and to amendement of his defaultes, namely seeing hys holinesse so intendeth to accomplish the same in deede, which in word he promiseth, according as he hath begon.

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And thus vndoubtedly both the noble L. Lieutenant, & all other princes & states of the empire, wel hope that he wil, and pray most hartily that he may doe, to the glory of our eternall God, to the health of soules, & to the tranquilitie of the publike state. For vnles such abuses and greuances, with certain other articles also,which the seculare princes (assigned purposely for the same) shall draw out in wryting, shall be faithfully reformed, there is no true peace & cōcord betwene the ecclesiasticall & seculer estates, nor any true extirpation of this tumult, & errors in Germanie that cā be hoped. MarginaliaGreuances of the Germaynes, cōplained of to the pope. Vide infra.For partly by lōg warres, partly by reason of other greuances & hinderances this nation of Germanie hath bene so wasted and consumed in money, that vnneth it is able to sustaine it selfe in priuate affaires, and necessary vpholding of iustice wythin it selfe: much lesse then to minister aid and succor to the kingdom of Hungary, & to the Croatians, against the Turke. And wheras al the states of the sacred Romane Empire doe not doubte, but the Popes holines doth right well vnderstād how the Germane princes did graunt & condescend for the money of Annates to be leaued to the see of Rome for terme of certen yeres, vpon condition that the said mony shuld be conuerted to maintain warre against the turkish infidels, and for defence of the catholike faith: MarginaliaAnnates falsely pretended of the Pope, to maintaine warre against the turke.& wheras the terme of these yeres is now expired long since, when as the said Annates should be gathered, and yet that mony hath not ben so bestowed to that vse, whereto it was first graunted: therefore if any such necessitie should nowe come, that any publike helpes or contributions against the Turke, should be demanded of the Germane people, they would aunswer againe, why is not that money of Annates reserued many yeares before to that vse, nowe to bee bestowed and applied, and so woulde they refuse to receiue anye more such burdens for that cause to be laid vpon them.

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Wherefore the said Lord Lieutenant, and other Princes & degrees of the Empire make earnest petition, that the Popes holines wil with a fatherly consideration expend the premisses, and surcease hereafter to require such Annates, MarginaliaAnnates is a certaine portion of money wont to be paide to the court of Rome, out of the one yeares fruites, at the vacation of an ecclesiasticall lyuing. which are accustomed after the death of bishops and other prelats, or ecclesiasticall persons, to be payd to the court of Rome, and suffer them to remaine to the chamber of the Empire, whereby iustice & peace may be more cōmodiously administred, the tranquilitie of the publike state of Germanie mainteined, and also by the same, due helpes may be ordeined and disposed to other Christen potentates in Germanie, agaynst the Turke, which otherwise without the same, is not to be hoped for.

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Item, wheras the Popes holines desireth to be informed what way were best to take, in resisting these errors of the Lutherians: to this the Lord Lieutenant, with other Princes add nobles do answere, that whatsoeuer helpe or counsell they can deuise, with willing harts they will be ready thervnto. Seeing therefore the state, aswell ecclesiasticall, as temporall, is farre out of frame, and haue so much corrupted their wayes, and seeing not onely of Luthers part, and of his sect, but also by diuers other occasions besides, so many errors, abuses, & corruptions, haue crept in: much requisite and necessary it is, that some effectuall remedie be prouided, as well for redresse of the church, as also for repressing of the Turks tyrannie. MarginaliaRemedye of reformatyō.Now what more present or effectuall remedy can be had, the Lord Lieutenant, with other estates and princes do not see, then this, that the Popes holines, by the consent of the Emperors maiestie, do summon a free Christen Councell in some conuenient place of Germanie, MarginaliaA generall Councell in Germany required.as at Strausburgh, or at Mentz, or at Colen, or at Metz, and that with as much speede as conueniently may be, so that the congregating of the said Councel be not deferred aboue one yere: in the which Councel it may be lawfull for euery person that there shall haue interest, either temporal or ecclesiastical, freely to speake & consult, to the glory of God, and health of soules, and the publike wealth of Christendome, without impeachment or restraynt, whatsoeuer oth, or other bond to the contrary notwithstanding: yea and it shalbe euery good mans part there to speake, not onely freely, but to speake that which is true, to the purpose, and to edifying, & not to pleasing or flattering, but simply and vprightly to declare his iudgemsnt, without all fraud or guile.

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And as touching by what waies these errors & tumultes of the Germane people may best be staid and pacified in the meane time, vntil the councell be set: MarginaliaAn interim before the Councell.the foresaid L. Lieutenant, with the other princes, therupon haue cōsulted & deliberated, that for as much as Luth. and certaine of his fellowes be within the territorye and dominion of the noble duke Friderike 

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The information on the dispute in Strausburg and Luther's reactions to the laws enacted by the princes at the Diet of Nuremburg are taken from Johannes Sleidan, A famiuse cronicle of our time, called Sleidanes Commentaries, trans. John Daus (London, 1560), STC 19848, fos. 39v-45r.

, the saide L. Lieutenant and other states of the Empire shall so labour the matter wyth the aforenamed Prince duke of Saxonie, MarginaliaWryting & Printing for a time suspended.that Luther and his followers shall not wryte, sette foorth, or print any thing during the sayde meane space, neither doe they doubte but that the sayde noble prince of Saxonie, for his Christian pietie, and obedience to the Romane Empire, as becōmeth a Prince of such excellent vertue, will effectually condescend to the same.

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Item, the said L. Lieutenant and princes shal labour so with the preachers of Germany, that they shall not in their sermōs teach or blow into the peoples eares, such matters, whereby the multitude may be moued to rebelliō or vpror, or be induced into error: MarginaliaThe office of preaching tempered.and that they shall preach & teach nothing, but the true, pure, sincere, & holy gospell, & aproued scripture, godly, mildly, & christianly, according to the doctrine and exposition of the Scripture, being approued and receiued of Christes Churche, abstaining from all suche thynges, whych are better vnknowen, then learned of the

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