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146 [133]

God shall be crowned eternally. With these wordes she embraced the fire, and sweetely slept in the Lord.

MarginaliaBarbara, Fausta, Euclatius, Maximinus, Iuliana, Anysia, Justina Tecla, Martyrs.There haue bene moreouer beside these aboue recited, diuers godly women and faithful martyrs, as Barbara a noble woman in Thuscia, who after miserable prisonment, sharpe cordes, and burnyng flames put to her sides, was at last beheaded. Also Fausta the virgin, which suffered vnder Maximinus, by whom Euclasius a ruler of the Emperours palace, and Maximinus the President were both conuerted, and also suffered martyrdome, as wytnesseth Metaphrastes. Item, Iuliana a virgin of singular beutye in Nicomedia, who after diuers agonies suffered likewise vnder Maximinus. Itē, Anysia a mayde of Thessalonica, who vnder the saide Maximinus suffered. Metaphr. ibid. Iustina which suffered with Cyprianus bishop of Antioch: not to omit also Tecla, although most writers do accorde that she suffered vnder Nero. Platina in vita Caii, maketh also mencion of Lucia and Agatha. All which holye maydes and virgins glorified the Lorde Christ with their constant martyrdome in this tenth and last persecution of Dioclesian.

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MarginaliaMarcellinus, Marcellus, Eusebius, Miltiades byshops of Rome and Martyrs.During the tyme of which persecution these bishops of Rome succeded one after an other, 

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Papal martyrs down to Milles

The Foxe Project was not able to complete the commentary on this section of text by the date by which this online edition was compiled (23 September 2008).

Caius who succeeded next after Xistus, mencioned Pag. 101. Marcellinus, Marcellus, Eusebius, and thē Miltiades: al which, dyed Martyrs in the tempest of this persecution. Fyrst Marcellinus after the Martyrdome of Caius was ordayned bishop: he being brought by Dioclesian to the Idoles, first yelded to their idolatrye, and was seene to sacrifice. MarginaliaMarcellinus denyeth and repenteth.Wherfore, being excommunicate by the Christians, fel in such repentaunce, that he returned again to Dicolesian, wher he standing to his former confession, and publickly condemning the idolatry of the heathen, recouered the crowne of Martyrdome: suffering wyth Claudius, Cyrinus, and Antoninus. Marcellus likewise was vrged of Maxentius to renounce his bishopricke & religion, & to sacrifice with thē to Idoles. Which when he constantly refused, was beaten with wasters, and so expelled the City. Then he entring into þe house of Lucina a wydow, assembled there the congregation: which when it came to the eares of Maxentius the tyraunt, he turned the house of Lucina into a stable, & made Marcellus the keeper of the beastes: and so with the stynche therof, and miserable handling, was put to death. MarginaliaAuthors dissente.
Ex Sabel. Enead. 7. lib. 8
Eusebius sat bishop of Rome, as Eusebius in Chron. saith vij. monethes: Marianus Scotus saith. viij. monethes. Damasus affirmeth. vj. yeres. Sabellicus alledgeth certayne autors that saye, that he was slayne by Maximinus: but correcteth that himselfe, affirming that Maximinus died before him. Miltiades by the testimonye of Platina, and other that follow hym, sat. iij. yeares, and vij. monethes, and suffred vnder Maximinus. But that seemeth not to be true, as both Sabellicus doth rightly note, MarginaliaSabel. ibid affirming that the same cannot stand by the supputacion of tyme: Forsomuch as the sayd Galerius Maximinus raygned but. ij. yeares, and died before Meltiades. MarginaliaA place of Platina confuted.Also Eusebius manifestlye expresseth the example of a letter of Constantine, written to this Miltiades bishop of Rome, playnely cōuicting that to be false, which Platina affirmeth.

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MarginaliaThe order & procedīg described in iudgement agaynst the byshop of Rome.In the booke collected of generall councels amoung the decretal epistles, there is a long tractation about the iudgement and condemnation of Marcellinus: whereof the Maisters and patrons of poperye in these our daies, take great hold to proue and defend the superioritie, or rather supremacy of the Pope to be aboue all generall councels: and that he ought not to be subiect to the condēnation of any person or persons, for that ther is wrytten: Nemo vnquam iudicauit pontificem, nec Præsul sacerdotem suum, quoniam prima sedes non iudicabitur a quoquā. &c. 

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Papal martyrs down to Milles.
Foxe text Latin

Nemo vnquam iudicauit pontificem, nec Præsul sacerdotem suum, quoniam prima sedes non iudicabitur a quoquā. &c.

Foxe text translation

Not translated.

Although this sentence of Helchiades see-meth apparātly to be patched in, rather by some Heldibrandus, thē by Helchiades: MarginaliaAn obiectiō of the papists answered vnto.both for that it hangeth with litle order of sence vpon þt which goeth before: again, because that prima sedes here mencioned, was not yet ordayned, nor attributed to the sea of Rome before the counsel of Nice, where the order and placing of bishops was first established. But to let this sentence passe, yet notwithstanding the circumstaunce and proceding of this iudgement, if it be rightly weyed, maketh very litle to the purpose of these men. Neither is it true that the bishops of this councell of Sinuesse, did not condemne Marcellinus: for the woordes of the councell be playne: Subscripserunt igitur in eius damnationem et damnauerunt eum extra ciuitatem. That is: They subscribed therfore to his condemnation, and condemned him to be expelled out of the citie. Moreouer by the sayd councel wer brought in the. 42. wytnesses against Marcellinus. In the sayd councell the verdict of the same witnesses was demaūded, and also receaued. Farthermore, Quirinus there, one of the bishops openly protested, that he would not depart the councell, before the malice of the bishops were reuealed: what doth all this declare, MarginaliaThe byshop of Rome cyted vp and appeareth before the coūcell.but that the bishop of Rome was called there, and did appere before the iudgement seate of the councel, and there stoode subiect to their sentence and autoritie, by the which he was expelled out of the city? As for the wordes of the councel wherupon our Papistes stand so much, Non enim nostro, sed tuo ipsius iudicio condemnaberis. &c. Item: Tuo ore iudica causam tuam. &c. 
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Papal martyrs down to Milles.
Foxe text Latin

Non enim nostro, sed tuo ipsius iudicio condemnaberis. &c. Item: Tuo ore iudica causam tuam. #38;c.

Foxe text translation

Not translated.

These woordes importe not here the autority of the Romane bishop to be aboue the councell, neyther do they declare what the councel could not do: but what they woulde and wished rather to be done, that is, rather that he shoulde acknowledge & confesse his crime before God and them, with a voluntarye yelding of his hart, then that the confession of suche an hainous fact should be extorted from him, through their condemnation: for that they saw to be expedient for hys soules health. Otherwise, their condemnation shoulde serue him to small purpose. And so it came to passe. For he being vrged of them to condemne himself, so did: prostrating him selfe, and weeping before them. MarginaliaThe byshop of Rome condemned by the coūcell.Wherupō immediatly they proceded to the sentence against him, condemning and pronouncing him to be expelled the citie. Now whether by this may be gathered, that the bishop of Rome ought not to bee cited, accused, and condemned by any person or persons, let the indifferent reader iudge simply.

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MarginaliaThe decretal epistles and constitutions of these byshops of Rome examined.As touching the decretal epistles, which be intituled vnder the name of these foresayde bishops: who so well aduiseth them, and with iudgement wyll examine the stile, the tyme, the argument, the hanging together of the matter, and the constitutions in them contayned (litle seruing to anye purpose, & nothing seruing for those so troublous dayes then present) maye easelye discerne them: either in no part to be theirs, or much of the same to be clouted and patched by the doings of other, which lyued in other tymes: MarginaliaThe chiefe scope of the cōstitutions decretall, to magnify the church of Rome.especially seing all the constitucions in them for the most part tende to the settyng vp & to exalt the sea of Rome aboue all other bishops & churches, and to reduce all causes and appeales to the sayde sea of Rome. MarginaliaThe epistle of Caius.So the epistle of Caius, beginning with the commendation of the autority of his sea, endeth after the same tenor: wylling and commaunding all difficult questions in al prouincies what soeuer emergyng, to be referred to the sea Apostolical. MarginaliaA great part of the epistle of Caius, takē out of the epistle of Leo to Leo the Emperour.Moreouer, the greatest part of the sayd epistle from this place, Quicunque illi sunt ita obcæcati. &c. to the end of this periode: Quoniam sicut ait B. Apostolus, Magnum est pietatis. &c. 

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Papal martyrs down to Milles.
Foxe text Latin

Quicunque illi sunt ita obcæcati. &c. . . . Quoniam sicut ait B. Apostolus, Magnum est pietatis. &c.

Foxe text translation

Not translated.

is cōtayned in the epistle of Leo, vnto Leo the Emperor: and so rightly agreeth in all poyntes with the style of Leo, that euident it is the same to be borowed not of Leo, out of the epistle of Caius, but to be patched into the epistle

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of Caius
m.j.