Thematic Divisions in Book 11
1. The Martyrdom of Rogers 2. The Martyrdom of Saunders 3. Saunders' Letters 4. Hooper's Martyrdom 5. Hooper's Letters 6. Rowland Taylor's Martyrdom 7. Becket's Image and other events 8. Miles Coverdale and the Denmark Letters 9. Bonner and Reconciliation 10. Judge Hales 11. The Martyrdom of Thomas Tomkins 12. The Martyrdom of William Hunter 13. The Martyrdom of Higbed and Causton 14. The Martyrdom of Pigot, Knight and Laurence 15. Robert Farrar's Martyrdom 16. The Martyrdom of Rawlins/Rowland White17. The Restoration of Abbey Lands and other events in Spring 155518. The Providential Death of the Parson of Arundel 19. The Martyrdom of John Awcocke 20. The Martyrdom of George Marsh 21. The Letters of George Marsh 22. The Martyrdom of William Flower 23. The Martyrdom of Cardmaker and Warne 24. Letters of Warne and Cardmaker 25. The Martyrdom of Ardley and Simpson 26. John Tooly 27. The Examination of Robert Bromley [nb This is part of the Tooly affair]28. The Martyrdom of Thomas Haukes 29. Letters of Haukes 30. The Martyrdom of Thomas Watts 31. Censorship Proclamation 32. Our Lady' Psalter 33. Martyrdom of Osmund, Bamford, Osborne and Chamberlain34. The Martyrdom of John Bradford 35. Bradford's Letters 36. William Minge 37. James Trevisam 38. The Martyrdom of John Bland 39. The Martyrdom of Frankesh, Middleton and Sheterden 40. Sheterden's Letters 41. Examinations of Hall, Wade and Polley 42. Martyrdom of Christopher Wade 43. Nicholas Hall44. Margery Polley45. Martyrdom of Carver and Launder 46. Martyrdom of Thomas Iveson 47. John Aleworth 48. Martyrdom of James Abbes 49. Martyrdom of Denley, Newman and Pacingham 50. Richard Hooke 51. Martyrdom of William Coker, et al 52. Martyrdom of George Tankerfield, et al 53. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Smith 54. Martyrdom of Harwood and Fust 55. Martyrdom of William Haile 56. George King, Thomas Leyes and John Wade 57. William Andrew 58. Martyrdom of Robert Samuel 59. Samuel's Letters 60. William Allen 61. Martyrdom of Roger Coo 62. Martyrdom of Thomas Cobb 63. Martyrdom of Catmer, Streater, Burwood, Brodbridge, Tutty 64. Martyrdom of Hayward and Goreway 65. Martyrdom and Letters of Robert Glover 66. Cornelius Bungey 67. John and William Glover 68. Martyrdom of Wolsey and Pigot 69. Life and Character of Nicholas Ridley 70. Ridley's Letters 71. Life of Hugh Latimer 72. Latimer's Letters 73. Ridley and Latimer Re-examined and Executed74. More Letters of Ridley 75. Life and Death of Stephen Gardiner 76. Martyrdom of Webb, Roper and Park 77. William Wiseman 78. James Gore 79. Examinations and Martyrdom of John Philpot 80. Philpot's Letters 81. Martyrdom of Thomas Whittle, Barlett Green, et al 82. Letters of Thomas Wittle 83. Life of Bartlett Green 84. Letters of Bartlett Green 85. Thomas Browne 86. John Tudson 87. John Went 88. Isobel Foster 89. Joan Lashford 90. Five Canterbury Martyrs 91. Life and Martyrdom of Cranmer 92. Letters of Cranmer 93. Martyrdom of Agnes Potten and Joan Trunchfield 94. Persecution in Salisbury Maundrell, Coberly and Spicer 95. William Tyms, et al 96. Letters of Tyms 97. The Norfolk Supplication 98. Martyrdom of John Harpole and Joan Beach 99. John Hullier 100. Hullier's Letters 101. Christopher Lister and five other martyrs 102. Hugh Lauerocke and John Apprice 103. Katherine Hut, Elizabeth Thacknell, et al 104. Thomas Drury and Thomas Croker 105. Thomas Spicer, John Deny and Edmund Poole 106. Persecution of Winson and Mendlesam 107. Gregory Crow 108. William Slech 109. Avington Read, et al 110. Wood and Miles 111. Adherall and Clement 112. A Merchant's Servant Executed at Leicester 113. Thirteen Burnt at Stratford-le-Bow114. Persecution in Lichfield 115. Hunt, Norrice, Parret 116. Martyrdom of Bernard, Lawson and Foster 117. Examinations of John Fortune118. John Careless 119. Letters of John Careless 120. Martyrdom of Julius Palmer 121. Agnes Wardall 122. Peter Moone and his wife 123. Guernsey Martyrdoms 124. Dungate, Foreman and Tree 125. Martyrdom of Thomas More126. Martyrdom of John Newman127. Examination of John Jackson128. Examination of John Newman 129. Martyrdom of Joan Waste 130. Martyrdom of Edward Sharpe 131. Four Burnt at Mayfield at Sussex 132. John Horne and a woman 133. William Dangerfield 134. Northampton Shoemaker 135. Prisoners Starved at Canterbury 136. More Persecution at Lichfield
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1498 [1472]

Q. Mary. The Martyrdome of Doctour Robert Farrar Byshop.

Marginalia1555. March.stantine his Register, and others, the last of February. Ann. 1555. 

Commentary  *  Close

The accounts of Ferrar's examinations in Carmarthen and the copies of his condemnation and degradation were taken from official records which are now lost. They may well have been sent to Foxe by the person or persons who sent him the records of Ferrar's troubles in Edward VI's reign.

MarginaliaAn other examination of B. Farrar.THis day and place Morgan the pretensed Bishop of S. Dauids sitting as Iudge ministred vnto Bishop Farrar there personally present before him certaine articles and interrogatories in writing, which being openlye read and ministred vnto hym, þe said B. Farrar refused to answere, vntyll he might see his lawfull Commission and authoritie. Wheruppon the foresaide pretensed Bishop of Saint Dauids did pronounce him as Contumax, and for the punishment of this his contumacie, to be counted Pro confesso, and so did pronounce hym in writing: which being done, he committed the saide Bishop to the custodye of Owen Ioans, vntil monday next, being the fourth day of March, then to be brought againe into the same place, betwixt one and two.

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¶ An other appearaunce of the said B. Farrar, before Morgan the pretensed bishop of S. Dauids. 
Commentary  *  Close

The accounts of Ferrar's examinations in Carmarthen and the copies of his condemnation and degradation were taken from official records which are now lost. They may well have been sent to Foxe by the person or persons who sent him the records of Ferrar's troubles in Edward VI's reign.

MarginaliaAn other appearaunce of B. Farrar.ITem, the day and place appoynted, the saide Bishop appearing againe before the pretensed Bishop, humbly submitting him selfe, as ready to answeare to the articles and positions aboue mentioned, gently required the copy of the articles, and a competent terme to be assigned vnto hym to answeare for hym selfe: which being graunted vnto hym, and Thursday next beyng assigned vnto hym, betwixt one and three to answeare precisely and fully, so he was cōmitted againe to custodie, as aboue.

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¶ An other appearaunce of the said Bishop. 
Commentary  *  Close

The accounts of Ferrar's examinations in Carmarthen and the copies of his condemnation and degradation were taken from official records which are now lost. They may well have been sent to Foxe by the person or persons who sent him the records of Ferrar's troubles in Edward VI's reign.

MarginaliaAn other appearaunce of the sayd Byshop.ON Thursday, as was appoynted, which was the 7. of March, the saide Bishop personally againe appeared, where he exhibited a certaine Byl in writing, conteinyng in it his answere vnto certaine articles obiected and ministred vnto hym before. Then after Henry the pretensed Bishop of S. Dauids offered hym againe the said articles, as before: the tenor wherof tended to this effect.

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MarginaliaArticles agayne ministred against B. Farrar.First, that he wylled hym beyng a Priest, to abrenoūce matrimonie.

Secondly, to graunt the natural presence of Christe in the sacrament, vnder the formes of bread and wine.

Thirdly, that the Masse is a propitiatorie sacrifice for the quicke and the dead.

Fourthly, that general Councels lawfully cōgregated, neuer did nor can erre.

Fiftly, that men are not iustified before God, by fayth onely, but that hope and charitie is also necessarily required to iustification.

Sixtly, that the Catholike Churche which onely hath authority to expound scriptures, and to define controuersies of Religion, and to ordeyne thinges apperteynyng to publike discipline, is visible, & like vnto a citie set vpon a mountaine for al men to vnderstand.

To these articles thus obiected to hym, MarginaliaB. Farrar denieth to subscribe to the Articles.he refused to subscribe, affirming that they were inuented and excogitated by man, and pertaine nothing to the Catholike faith. After this the bishop aboue named, deliuered vnto hym the copie of the articles, assignyng hym monday next folowing to answeare and subscribe to the same, eyther affirmatiuely or negatiuely.

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¶ An other apperance of Bishop Farrar. 
Commentary  *  Close

The accounts of Ferrar's examinations in Carmarthen and the copies of his condemnation and degradation were taken from official records which are now lost. They may well have been sent to Foxe by the person or persons who sent him the records of Ferrar's troubles in Edward VI's reign.

MarginaliaAn other appearaunce or examination of B. Farrar.VPon the which Monday, being the. xi. day of March he appearing againe before the Bishop and the foresayd Notarye George Constantine, exhibited in a written paper, his minde and aunsweare to the foresayde Articles, whiche the Bishop had twise nowe obiected againste hym before. To the which articles and answeares, he did so subscribe, adding these woordes, as tenens de se æquitate & iustitia esse Episcopum Meneuensem, that the bishop assigned the next Wednesday in the fore noone, to heare his final and definitiue sentence.

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¶ The last appearance of Bishop Farrar. 
Commentary  *  Close

The accounts of Ferrar's examinations in Carmarthen and the copies of his condemnation and degradation were taken from official records which are now lost. They may well have been sent to Foxe by the person or persons who sent him the records of Ferrar's troubles in Edward VI's reign.

MarginaliaThe last appearaunce and examination of the blessed Byshop M. Farrer.THe whiche daye and place the said Bishop and true seruaunt of God maister Farrar, personally there appearing, was demaunded of Henry the pretensed bishop of S. Dauids, whether he would renounce and recant his heresies, schismes, and errours (as he called them) which hytherto he had mainteined, and if he woulde subscribe to the Catholike articles, otherwise the he had done before.

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After this the sayde godly Maister Farrar dyd exhi-

bite a certayne schedule written in Englishe, and remaynyng in the Actes, MarginaliaB. Farrar appealeth from the B. of saint Dauids to the Cardinall.appealyng withall by expresse woorde of mouth from the Bishop, as from an incompetent Iudge, to Cardinall Poole. &c.

All whiche notwithstanding, the saide Byshop proceedyng in his rage, MarginaliaSentence pronounced agaynst B. Farrar.pronounced the definitiue sentence against hym, conteyned in writyng, and there leaft in the Actes: by the which sentence he pronounced hym as an heretique excommunicate, and to be geuen vp foorthwith to the secular power, namely to the Sheriffe of the Towne of Carmarthen, Mayster Leyson. 

Commentary  *  Close

Notice that in 1563, this is followed by a comment of Ferrar's denouncing vestments. It was probably lost when Foxe replaced the account of Ferrar's execution in 1570.

The tenour of whiche sentence as likewise of al other sentences, because they runne much after the fourme of the sentence pronounced agaynst Maister Rogers, expressed before. pag. 1417. I shal not neede often to repeate the same, where the example of that one may suffice for all.

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Moreouer, after this sentence thus pronounced, he also denounced againste him the Sentence of degradation, first puttyng vpon hym al their priestly vestures (whiche maister Farrar at the same time, openly and publikely called in Englishe, ragges and reliques of Rome, as the Register recordeth) and after depriued hym of the same. The copie whereof read before expressed in the storie of maister Hooper. pag. 1434.

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MarginaliaB. Farrar brought to the place of execution.Thus this godly Bishop 

Commentary  *  Close

This account of Ferrar's execution, replacing the account in the Rerum and 1563, first appeared in 1570. With its specific details, particularly the mention of Richard Jones, it is undoubtedly from an eyewithess.

being condemned and disgraded, was committed to the secular power: who not long after was brought to the place of execution in the Towne of Carmarthen, where he in the market place on the Southside of the market Crosse, the xxx. day of March, being saterday next before Passion sonday, most constantly susteyned the tormentes and passion of the fire.

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MarginaliaThe Martyrdome of D. Robert Farrar, B. and Martyr, at Carmarthen. Anno. 1555. March. 30.The cruel burnyng of Maister Farrar, Martyr.

woodcut [View a larger version]

Commentary on the Woodcuts  *  Close
The woodcut illustrating Bishop Farrar's death was changed in 1570 for a block very different from that used in 1563. This earlier image belonged to the group of burnings with very distinct characteristics (skeletal bodies with flames invading them) whose dimensions were difficult to accommodate on the page. Like others of its kind in the first edition (eg William Sawtry, 1563, p. 142) the cut spread into the gutter and the left column of text. This awkwardness doubtless dictated its replacement. The replacement of 1570 came from Reginaldus Gonsalvius Montanus, De heylighe spaensche inquisitie (John Day, 1569), sig. x7v, and thereafter the block (identifiable from the chip on its top left corner) saw multiple use. In 1570, it was repeated seven times, and in 1583, it stood for eight martyrs besides Farrar, between the years 1436 and 1555 (1583, pp. 668, 701, 815, 998, 1030, 1040, 1275, 1682). Further chips on the lower edge in 1576 and 1583 bear witness to this extensive reuse. This woodcut of a martyr chained in flames is typical of many of the Marian martyrs illustrated in 1570, and thereafter, and this example suggests that difficulties of layout may have prompted Day to start working towards a new series, tailored to the page, not long after the appearance of the first edition. (See 1563, pp. 1548-49 (mispagination - pp. 1548-49). This woodcut (Type 1) with its distinctive flares and ionic scrolls of flames belongs to a recognisable family of these small martyr images, but their designers and cutters have not been identified. It may be noted that the speech scroll in 1563, is in italic, unlike that of the companion block in 1563, p. 1603 (the burning of a Norwich man and woman), which is in roman.

Touchyng the which constancie of this blessed martyr, 

Commentary  *  Close

Once again Foxe is anxious to recount the stoicism of a martyr. On the polemical importance of the stoicism of the martyrs see Collinson (1983) and Freeman (1997).

this is moreouer to be added & noted: that one named Richard Iones, a knightes sonne, commyng to maister Farrar a litle before his death, seemed to lament the painfulnes of the death he had to suffer. Vnto whom the Bishop answeared againe to this effect, saying: MarginaliaA memorable example of constancie in this blessed B. and Martyr.that if he saw him once to stirre in the paynes of his burnyng, he should then geue no credite to his doctrine. And as he sayde, so he right well perfourmed the same, for so paciently he stood, that he neuer moued, but euen as he stood holdyng vp his stumpes, so still he continued tyl one Rich. Grauel with a staffe dashed him vppon the head, and so stroke hym downe.

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Letters.

As touchyng the letters of master Farrar, we doo not finde many that he did write. And peraduenture in queene

Maryes
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