Critical Apparatus for this Page
View an Image of this PageCommentary on the Text
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Hake

Robert Testwood refused to carry the relic of St George's dagger, but insisted it be given to Hake instead and then joked about it. 1570, p. 1387; 1576, p. 1184; 1583, p. 1212.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Henry Filmer

(d. 1543) [Fines]

Tailor of Windsor; churchwarden; held prohibited books; martyr

A sermon by the vicar of Windsor, Thomas Melster, offended one of his churchwardens, Henry Filmer. He spoke to the vicar, who thanked him and reformed himself. William Symonds complained to Filmer and went to the mayor and then to the bishop, taking the vicar with him. 1570, p. 1388; 1576, p. 1184; 1583, p. 1213.

[Back to Top]

Filmer consulted with his friends, who advised him to take notes of the vicar's sermons and to go to the bishop. He got to the bishop before Symonds; the bishop read his bill and decided that the vicar had preached heresy. From this time on, Symonds was determined to get Filmer condemned. 1570, pp. 1388-89; 1576, pp. 1184-85; 1583, p. 1213.

[Back to Top]

Ward and Thomas Vachell were appointed commissioners to search for books at Windsor. Robert Bennett, Henry Filmer, John Marbeck and Robert Testwood were found to be holding books contrary to the Six Articles. Filmer and Bennett were imprisoned in the bishop of London's jail. 1570, p. 1390; 1576, p. 1186; 1583, p. 1214.

[Back to Top]

Mrs Filmer pleaded with the bishops who were commissioners for the Six Articles to give her husband an audience. She eventually found the bishops of Ely, Salisbury and Hereford together and put her case. However, John London and William Symonds ensured that Filmer was never brought before the bishops. 1570, p. 1395; 1576, p. 1189; 1583, p. 1218.

[Back to Top]

Henry Filmer, Anthony Pearson and John Marbeck were taken to Windsor and put into prison there. Robert Testwood was brought out of his house on crutches and put with them. 1570, p. 1395; 1576, p. 1190; 1583, p. 1218.

Symonds brought Henry Filmer's brother to John London's house, where he was won over with food, drink and promises of friendship and plenty. London retained him as one of his household men until the day of Henry Filmer's trial, when his brother gave testimony against him. 1570, p. 1396; 1576, p. 1190; 1583, p. 1219.

[Back to Top]

Filmer, Pearson, Marbeck and Testwood were put on trial at Windsor and all were found guilty by the jury. 1570, p. 1397; 1576, p. 1191; 1583, p. 1219.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John Chambre

(1470 - 1549) [ODNB]

Physician and cleric; archdeacon of Bedford (1525 - 49); treasurer of Wells (1510 - May 1543, October 1543 - 1549); canon of Windsor (1509 - 49)

Thomas Magnus posted a poem praising the Virgin on the choir door at Windsor. Robert Testwood twice tore it down. Magnus arranged to have letters complaining of Testwood sent from him, the dean and other canons to John Chambre. No action resulted from the complaint. 1570, p. 1388; 1576, p. 1184; 1583, p. 1212.

[Back to Top]
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
John London

(1485/6 - 1543) [ODNB; Emden]

Administrator; native of Hambleden, Buckinghamshire

BCL Oxford 1513; DCL 1519; warden of New College, Oxford (1526 - 42); regarded in Oxford and elsewhere as a great opponent of reform; notary public by 1533; dean of Wallingford 1536; canon and prebendary of Salisbury and Windsor 1540; dean of Oxford 1542; participated in the dissolution of the monasteries; convicted of perjury in 1543, died in prison

[Back to Top]

Alice Doly's servant was brought before John London to give evidence against her mistress in Buckinghamshire in 1520. 1570, p. 1118; 1576, p. 957; 1583, p. 984.

The arrest of Thomas Garrard at Oxford brought great joy to John London and John Hygdon. 1563, p. 605; 1570, p. 1366; 1576, p. 1166; 1583, p. 1194.

After Thomas Garrard escaped, John Cottisford was blamed by the John Hygdon and John London. They sent out spies to search. 1563, p. 606; 1570, p. 1367; 1576, p. 1167; 1583, p. 1195.

Anthony Dalaber was brought before London, John Hygdon and John Cottisford and examined. 1563, p. 608; 1570, p. 1368; 1576, p. 1167; 1583, p. 1196.

Thomas Garrard was apprehended after his escape and examined by Cottisford, Hygdon and London. He was condemned as a heretic and made to bear a faggot. 1563, p. 609; 1570, p. 1369; 1576, p. 1168; 1583, p. 1197.

John London was one of the examiners of the reformers in Cardinal College, Oxford. 1570, p. 1174; 1576, p. 1004; 1583, p. 1032.

Some plate was stolen from New College, Oxford, and sold to William Callaway in London. Callaway bought the goods in good faith. When John London, warden of the college, discovered that he had bought it and that he was a protestant, he brought a charge of felony against him. 1563, pp. 626-27; 1570, p. 1408; 1576, pp. 1200-01; 1583, p. 1230.

[Back to Top]

London was one of the chief persecutors of Robert Testwood, Henry Filmer and Anthony Pearson at Windsor. 1563, p. 630; 1570, p. 1386; 1576, p. 1182; 1583, p. 1211.

Anthony Pearson often preached in Windsor, where his sermons were very popular with the people, but not with the conservative clerics, especially William Symonds and John London. 1570, p. 1389; 1576, p. 1185; 1583, p. 1213.

After London had been in Windsor a while, he learned of the views of Robert Testwood and was shown the broken nose of the image of the Virgin. 1570, p. 1389; 1576, p. 1185; 1583, p. 1213.

Symonds and London kept notes of Pearson's sermons. They included the names of all those who frequented the sermons. They reported all of these to Stephen Gardiner. 1570, p. 1389; 1576, p. 1185; 1583, pp. 1213-14.

Henry Filmer's wife pleaded with the bishops who were commissioners for the Six Articles to give her husband an audience. She eventually found the bishops of Ely, Salisbury and Hereford together and put her case. However, John London and William Symonds ensured that Filmer was never brought before the bishops. 1570, p. 1395; 1576, p. 1189; 1583, p. 1218.

[Back to Top]

Symonds brought Henry Filmer's brother to John London's house, where he was won over with food, drink and promises of friendship and plenty. London retained him as one of his household men until the day of Henry Filmer's trial, when his brother gave testimony against him. 1570, p. 1396; 1576, p. 1190; 1583, p. 1219.

[Back to Top]

After the secret indictments against members of the privy council were discovered and the king's pardon granted, John London, William Symonds and Robert Ockham were brought before the council and found guilty of perjury. They were sentenced to ride backwards on horses, wearing papers, and to stand in the pillories of Windsor, Reading and Newbury. 1570, p. 1399; 1576, p. 1193; 1583, p. 1221.

[Back to Top]
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Robert Phillips

(1499x1502 - in or after 1553) [ODNB]

Musician; gentleman of the royal chapel, Windsor

Robert Phillips was singing in Windsor chapel when Robert Testwood joined in, altering the words and gravely upsetting Phillips. 1570, p. 1388; 1576, p. 1184; 1583, p. 1212.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Cromwell

(in or bef. 1485 - 1540) [ODNB]

Lawyer; king's secretary; chief minister

Earl of Essex 1540; beheaded gruesomely

Thomas Cromwell was the son of a smith. He had an impressive memory and was skilled in languages. He was retained by the English merchants in Antwerp as clerk. He accompanied Geoffrey Chambers to Rome to obtain indulgences for the guild of Our Lady in Boston. 1570, p. 1346; 1576, p. 1149; 1583, pp. 1177-78.

[Back to Top]

As a young man Cromwell fought with the French at Garigliano. He was then destitute in Italy and was helped by the Italian merchant banker Francesco Frescobaldi. Cromwell years later repaid him with generous interest when Frescobaldi was impoverished in England. 1570, pp. 1357-58; 1576, pp. 1158-59; 1583, pp. 1186-87.

[Back to Top]

Cromwell confessed to archbishop Cranmer that he had been wild in his youth. He was at the siege of Rome with the duke of Bourbon. 1570, p. 1346; 1576, p. 1149; 1583, pp. 1177-78.

Cromwell, Thomas More and Stephen Gardiner served together in Thomas Wolsey's household. 1563, p. 592; 1570, p. 1347; 1576, p. 1150; 1583, p. 1178.

Cromwell was one of Wolsey's chief councillors and was active in the dissolution of the monasteries. After Wolsey's fall and his departure to Southwell, Cromwell entered the king's service. 1570, pp. 1132, 1347; 1576, pp. 969, 1150; 1583, pp. 996, 1179.

Cromwell was knighted, made master of the jewels and admitted to the king's council. Two years later he was made master of the rolls. Shortly before the birth of Prince Edward, Cromwell was created earl of Essex and appointed viceregent. 1570, p. 1348; 1576, p. 1151; 1583, p. 1179.

Cromwell discovered and made public fraudulent miracles. 1570, p. 1359; 1576, p. 1160; 1583, p. 1188.

Elizabeth Barton prophesied that if the king divorced Queen Catherine and married Anne Boleyn, he would not reign more than a month thereafter. Through the efforts of Cranmer, Cromwell and Latimer, she was condemned and executed with some of her supporters. 1570, p. 1199; 1576, p. 1026; 1583, pp. 1054-55.

[Back to Top]

Cromwell urged King Henry to destroy the monastic houses and to grant the lands to the nobility and gentlemen. 1570, p. 1350; 1576, p. 1153; 1583, p. 1181.

Edward Lee was sent, under Cromwell, to visit the monasteries and nunneries to release all those in religious orders who wished to leave. 1570, p. 1218; 1576, p. 1043; 1583, p. 1070.

Cromwell gave an oration at the synod in 1537 of bishops and learned men. 1570, p. 1351; 1576, p. 1153; 1583, p. 1182.

Gardiner was a resident ambassador to France in 1538, when Edmund Bonner, through the efforts of Thomas Cromwell, was brought in to replace him. Bonner owed his major preferments to Cromwell. 1570, p. 1239; 1576, p. 1061; 1583, p. 1088.

Bonner sent a declaration to Cromwell of Stephen Gardiner's evil behaviour. 1570, pp. 1241-44; 1576, pp. 1063-66; 1583, pp. 1090-92.

Through the efforts of Cromwell, the destruction of the abbeys and religious houses was accomplished. 1570, p. 1255; 1576, p. 1075; 1583, p. 1101.

At the end of John Lambert's trial, the king had Cromwell read the sentence of condemnation. On the day of Lambert's execution, Cromwell asked for his forgiveness. 1563, pp. 537, 569; 1570, pp. 1283-84; 1576, pp. 1097-98; 1583, pp. 1123-24.

The king sent Cromwell and the dukes of Norfolk and Suffolk to dine with Thomas Cranmer to reassure him after his opposition to the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1298; 1576, p. 1111; 1583, p. 1136.

The wife of Thomas Broke wrote to Thomas Cromwell, complaining of the way the imprisoned men in Calais, especially her husband, were treated. Cromwell wrote to the commissioners in Calais, commanding that Broke and a number of others be sent to England. 1563, p. 666; 1570, p. 1405; 1576, p. 1198; 1583, p. 1227.

[Back to Top]

Cromwell was instrumental in obtaining Edmund Bonner's nomination to the bishopric of London. Cromwell procured letters from King Henry to Francois I that resulted in a licence being granted to print bibles in English at Paris. 1570, p. 1362; 1576, p. 1162; 1583, p. 1191.

When printing of English bibles was stopped in Paris, Cromwell got the presses and types sent to London. 1570, p. 1362; 1576, p. 1163; 1583, p. 1191.

Stephen Gardiner was Cromwell's chief opponent. Cromwell had other enemies as well, and in 1540 he was suddenly arrested in the council chamber and committed to the Tower. He was charged with heresy and treason. 1563, p. 598; 1570, p. 1359; 1576, pp. 1160-61; 1583, p. 1189.

Cromwell, having made an oration and prayer, was beheaded by an incompetent axeman. 1563, p. 598; 1570, pp. 1361-62; 1576, p. 1162; 1583, p. 1190.

Stephen Gardiner recalled that Cromwell spent a day and a half investigating a matter between Sir Francis Bryan and Gardiner, finally declaring Gardiner an honest man. 1563, p. 756; 1570, p. 1526; 1576, p. 1301; 1583, p. 1351.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Magnus

(1463/4 - 1550) [ODNB]

Administrator; diplomat; archdeacon of East Riding (1504 - 50); canon of Windsor (1520 - 47); JP for all 3 Yorkshire ridings (1538 - 50); founded grammar school and chantry at Newark

Thomas Magnus posted a poem praising the Virgin on the choir door at Windsor. Robert Testwood twice tore it down. Magnus arranged to have letters complaining of Testwood sent from him, the dean and other canons to John Chambre. No action resulted from the complaint. 1570, p. 1388; 1576, p. 1184; 1583, p. 1212.

[Back to Top]
 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Thomas Melster

Vicar of Windsor c. 1541; former friar

A sermon by Thomas Melster offended one of his churchwardens, Henry Filmer. He spoke to the vicar, who thanked him and reformed himself. William Symonds then spoke to the vicar, who reversed his opinion again. Symonds took Melster with him when he went to the bishop to complain of Filmer, a difficult journey for the vicar as he had a sore leg. 1570, p. 1388; 1576, p. 1184; 1583, p. 1213.

[Back to Top]

Filmer had got to the bishop first, showing him a bill with notes of the vicar's sermons. The bishop declared that the vicar had preached heresy. He then saw Melster, who admitted his fault and was ordered publicly to recant his heresy. 1570, pp. 1388-89; 1576, pp. 1184-85; 1583, p. 1213.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
Ward

Elderly justice of the peace living 3 or 4 miles from Windsor

The canons of Windsor sent for Master Ward to bring Robert Testwood to the church. Ward promised on his oath to protect Testwood and conducted him there safely. 1570, p. 1387; 1576, p. 1183; 1583, p. 1212.

Ward and Thomas Vachell were appointed commissioners to search for books at Windsor. Robert Bennett, Henry Filmer, John Marbeck and Robert Testwood were found to be holding books contrary to the Six Articles. 1570, p. 1390; 1576, p. 1186; 1583, p. 1214.

 
Person and Place Index  *  Close
William Franklyn

(1480/81 - 1556) [ODNB]

BCnL 1504/5; chancellor of Durham 1514; archdeacon of Durham 1515; dean of Windsor (1536 - 53)

William Franklyn was one of the persecutors of Robert Testwood, Henry Filmer and Anthony Pearson. 1570, p. 1386; 1576, p. 1182; 1583, p. 1211.

Robert Testwood tore down a poem in praise of the Virgin posted by Thomas Magnus. This was done in the presence of William Franklyn, who was too cowardly to take any action at the time. 1570, p. 1388; 1576, p. 1184; 1583, p. 1212.

The judges of John Marbeck, Henry Filmer, Anthony Pearson and Robert Testwood at Windsor were John Capon, Sir William Essex, Thomas Brydges, Sir Humphrey Foster, William Franklyn and Thomas Vachell. 1570, p. 1396; 1576, p. 1191; 1583, p. 1219.

1236 [1212]

King. Henry. 8. Persecution in Windsore. The trouble of Testwood Martyr.

After this sort he admonished them so long, MarginaliaTestwood exhotteth the people from Idolatry till at the last, his words (as God would) tooke such place in some of them, that they said, they would neuer goe a pilgrimage more. Then he went further, & found another sort licking & kissing a white Lady made of Alabaster, which Image was mortrest in a wall behind the hie altar, and bordred about with a prety border, which was made like branches with hanging apples & floures. And when he sawe them so superstitiously vse the Image (as to wipe their handes vpon it, & then to stroke them ouer their hands & faces, as though there had ben great vertue in touching þe picture MarginaliaIdolatry to an image of a white Lady made of Alabaster in windsore.) he vp with his hand in the which he had a key, and smote a peece of the border about the image, downe, and with the glaunce of the stroke chanced to breake of the images nose. MarginaliaTestwood defaceth the Image. Lo, good people, quoth he, ye see what it is, nothyng but earth & dust, and cannot helpe it selfe, & how will you then haue it to helpe you? For Gods sake brethren, be no more deceyued: and so he gate him home to his house, for the rumor was so great, that many came to see the Image, how it was defaced. And among all other came one MarginaliaW. Simons a persecuter.Williā Symons (a Lawyer) who seyng the image so berayed, and to lacke her nose, tooke the matter greuously, & looking down vpon the pauement, he spied the images nose where it lay, which he tooke vp and put in his purse, saying, MarginaliaO blinde Popedy to seeke the neath of a liuing man for the nose of a dead stocke. Magna Diana Ephesiorum. Act. 28. it should be a deare nose to Testwood one day.

[Back to Top]

Now were many offended with Testwood, the canons for speaking against their profit, the waxe sellers for hyndring their market, & Symons for the Images nose. And more then that, there were of the canons men that threatned to kill him. Whereupon Testwood kept his house, and durst not come forth, minding to haue sent the whole matter in writing by his wife, to M. Cromwell the kings secretary who was his special frend. The Canons hearyng that Testwood would send to Cromwel, they send þe Verger vnto him, to will him to come to the church: who sent them word agayne, that he was in feare of his lyfe, & therfore would not come. Then sent they two of þe eldest Peticanons to entreat him, & to assure him that no man should do him harme. He made them a plaine answer, that he had no such trust to their promises, but would complain to his frendes. Then wist they not what shift to make ( MarginaliaThe papistes of Windsore afraid of Cromwell.for of all men they feared Cromwel) but sent in post hast for old M. Ward, a iustice of peace dwelling 3. or 4. myles of, who being come & hearing the matter, was very loth to meddle in it. MarginaliaThe Canons of Windsore glad to fall in agayne with TestwoodBut notwithstanding, through their entreaty he wēt to Testwood & had much ado to perswade him, but at the last, he did so faithfully promise him by the oth he had made to God & the king, to defend him from all daungers and harmes, that Testwood was content to go with him.

[Back to Top]

And when M. Ward and Testwood were come into the Church, and were goyng toward the Chapter house, where the Canons abode their commyng, MarginaliaTestwood in daunger of hys lyfe.one of the Canons men drew his dagger at Testwood, and would haue bene vpon him, but M. Ward with his men resisted, and gat Testwood into the Chapter house, causing the seruing men to be called in, and sharply rebuked of their maisters, who straitly commanded them vpon paine of loosing their seruice, & further displeasure, not to touch him nor to geue him an euill worde. Nowe Testwood being alone, in the Chapter house with the Canons and M. Ward was gētly intreated, & the matter so pacified, that Testwood might quietly come and go to the Church, and do his duety as he had done before.

[Back to Top]
An other cause of Testwoods trouble.

MarginaliaAn other cause of Testwoods trouble.VPon a Relique sonday 

Commentary  *  Close

Relic Sunday is the third Sunday after Midsummer day and thus falls in mid-July.

(as they named it) when euery Minister after their olde custome should haue borne a relique in his hand about a procession, one was brought to Testwood. Which relique (as they said) was a Ratchet of bishop Beckets. 
Commentary  *  Close

A rochet is a white linen vestment; this one was putatively worn by Archbishop Thomas Becket. Since Becket's shrine was destroyed on Henry VIII's orders, in 1538, this would suggest that this incident took place before then.

MarginaliaTho Beckets Rachet made a Relique. And as the Sexten would haue put the Ratchet in Testwoods hands, he pushed it from hym, sayeng, if he did geue it to him, he would wipe his taile withall, & so the Ratchet was geuen to another. Then came the Verger down from the hie altar with S. Georges dagger in his hand, demāding who lacked a relique. MarginaliaS. Georges dagger made a relique. Mary (quoth Testwood geue it to M. Hake (who stood next him) for hee is a prety man of his hands, & so the dagger was geuē vnto him. Now Testwood perceiuing the dagger in maister Hakes hand, and being merily disposed (as he was a mery conceited man) stepped forth out of his place to D. Clifton standing directly before him in the midst of the quire, with a glorious golden Cope vpon his backe, hauing the Pixe in his hand, and said: Sir, M. Hake hath Saint Georges dagger. Now if he had his horse, and S. Martins cloke, and maister Iohn Shornes bootes, with king Henries spurres, and his hat, he might ride when he would 
Commentary  *  Close

St Martin, a fourth century bishop of Tours, was famous for sharing his cloak with a beggar. John Schorne was a fourteenth-century rector of North Marston, who was popularly venerated as a saint. His body was moved to Windsor in 1478, where it was an extremely popular pilgrimage site. Schorne was credited with trapping the devil in a boot during an exorcism and his boots were credited with the power to heal gout.

[Back to Top]
, and so stepped into his place againe. Whereat the other chaungedcolour, and wist not what to say.

[Back to Top]
Another cause of Testwoods trouble.

IN the dayes of M. Franklen MarginaliaM. Francklen Deane of windsore., who succeeded D. Sampson in the Deanry of Windsore 

Commentary  *  Close

William Franklin became dean of Windsor in 1536 after Thomas Sampson was promoted to the bishopric of Chichester.

, there was on a tyme set vp at the Quire dore, a certaine foolishe printed paper in Meter, all to the prayse and commendation of our Ladye, MarginaliaBlasphemy and Idolatry to our Lady.ascribing vnto her our iustification, our saluation, our redemption, the forgeuenes of sinnes, &c. to the great derogation of Christ. Which paper, one of the Canons called M. Magnus (as it was reported) caused to be set vp in despite of Testwood and his sect. When Testwood sawe this paper, he pluckt it downe secretly. The next day after was another set vp in the same place. Then Testwood cōming into the Church, and seyng another paper set vp, and also the Deane commyng a little way of, made haste to be in at the Quire dore, while the Deane stayd to take holy water, and reaching vp his hand as he went, pluckt away þe paper with hym. MarginaliaTestwoode taketh downe the blasphemous paper. The Deane beyng come to hys stall, called Testwood vnto him, and sayd, that he maruelled greatlye how he durst be so bolde to take downe the paper in hys presence? Testwood aunswered agayne, that he maruelled much more, that his maistership would suffer suche a blasphemous paper to be set vp, beseeching hym not to be offended with that he had done, for he woulde stand vnto it. So M. Deane being a timerous man, made no more ado with him. After this were no mo papers set vp, but poore Testwood was eaten and drunken among them at euery meale, and an heretike he was, and would rost a fagot for this geare one day.

[Back to Top]

MarginaliaM. Magnus magnus Idolatra.Now maister Magnus being sore offended with Testwood for pluckyng downe his papers, to be reuenged on him, deuised with the Deane and the rest of the Canons, to send their letters to D. Chamber, one of their brethren, and the Kings Phisition, who lay (for the most part) at the Court, to see what he would do against Testwood. MarginaliaConspiracy of the Priestes of Windsore agaynst Testwood. Which letters being made, were sent with speede. But whatsoeuer the cause was, whether he durst not meddle for feare of Cromwell, or what els I cannot tell, their suite came to none effect. Then wyst they not what to do, but determined to let the matter sleepe, till S. Georges feast 

Commentary  *  Close

I.e., 23 April.

, whiche was not farre of.

[Back to Top]

Now in the meane tyme there chaunced a prety storye, betweene one Robert Phillips Gentleman of the Kings Chappel, 

Commentary  *  Close

The Gentleman of the Chapel Royal were singers and musicians who served the royal court and followed the king on his perambulations. When the king was at Windsor - as he was in this case for the Feast of St. George - the members of this choir joined with the regular choir of St. George's chapel.

and Testwood. Which story, though it was but a mery pranke of a singing man, yet it greeued his aduersary wonderfully. The matter was this. Robert Phillips was so notable a singing man (wherein he gloryed) that wheresoeuer he came, the best and longest song, with most counteruerses in it, shuld be set vp at his commyng. And so his chaunce beyng now to be at Windsore, agaynst hys comming to the Antheme, MarginaliaA blasphemous Antheme, calling the virgin Mary our Sauiour and redeemer. a long song was set vp, called Lauda viui. In which song there was one counteruerse toward the end, that began on this wise, O redemptrix & saluatrix. Which verse of all other, Robert Phillips woulde sing, because he knew that Testwood could not abide that dittie. Now Testwood knowing his mynd well enough, ioyned with him at the other part: MarginaliaA mery contention betweene Rob. Philips of the kings chapell, and Testwood, about O Redemtrix, and Non Redemtrix:and when he heard Robert Phillips begin to fetch his flourish with O redemptrix & saluatrix: repeating the same one in anothers neck. Testwood was as quicke on the other side to answer hym agayne with Non redemptrix, nec saluatrix, and so striuyng there with O and Non, who should haue the maistrie, they made an ende of the verse. Whereat was good laughyng in sleeues of some, but Robert Phillips with other of Testwoods enimies were sore offended.

[Back to Top]

Within 14. dayes after this, the Lordes of the Garter (as their custome is yearely to doe) came to Wyndsore to keepe S. Georges feast: at which feast the Duke of Norfolke was President: MarginaliaTestwoode complayned of, to the olde Duke of Northfolke.vnto whom the Deane and canons made a greeuous complaint on Testwood. Who being called before the Duke, he shooke hym vp and all to reuiled hym, as though he would haue sent him to hangyng by & by. Yet neuerthelesse Testwood so behaued himselfe to the Duke, that in the ende he let hym go without any further molestyng of hym, to the great discomfort of the Deane and Canons.

[Back to Top]

Here haue ye heard the causes which moued Testwoods enemies to seeke his destruction, and coulde not attayne their purpose, till that wicked Aman 

Commentary  *  Close

This is a reference from the Old Testament book of Esther. Haman is the evil counsellor of the Persian emperor who sought to have the Jews massacred.

D. London came, as shall be shewed in the processe followyng.

The originall of Henry Filmers trouble.

ABout the yeare of our Lord, 1541. after all the orders of superstitious and beggyng Friers were suppressed and put downe, there chaunced one Sir Thomas Mel-

ster,